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Children, Food, and Life: What is the loveliest thing a child has ever said to you? Richard Muller, Prof Physics, UC Berkeley, author "Now, The Physics of Time" Updated Aug 2, 2017 Originally Answered: What is the loveliest thing your child has ever said? "Would you like one, Grandpa?" OK- it was not my child but my 3-year-old granddaughter, but I still think it counts. I had read about the marshmallow test. You give a child a marshmallow, and then say that if she (Layla, in this case) could keep from eating it for 10 minutes, you'll give her a second. So I tried that test with my granddaughter (not with marshmallows, but with chocolate, which she likes much more) According to extensive experiments, children who "pass" the "marshmallow test" are far more successful in later life. They have learned a fundamental truth in life, that delayed gratification can lead to a far better long-term outcome. She sat and watched the chocolate. The 10-minute hourglass finally emptied, and she had succeeded. She asked for her second piece of chocolate. I gave it to her, and she now had two in her hand. That's when she looked up at me and asked, "Would you like one, Grandpa?" Needless to say, from that moment on I would readily give my life for her. 1.3m views View Upvoters View Sharers hippo-pot: awesomacious: The sweetest granddaughter btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are essentially more likely to trust that they will actually get the marshmallow if they wait whereas poorer kids are generally more used to like, if you have food, eat it. and being wealthier correlates to being more successful later in life because our system is broken. so THAT’s probably why the marshmallow test is a predictor - because it tells you who is wealthy, not who is innately primed to be successful Classic correlation does not equal causation
Children, Food, and Life: What is the loveliest thing a child has
 ever said to you?
 Richard Muller, Prof Physics, UC Berkeley,
 author "Now, The Physics of Time"
 Updated Aug 2, 2017
 Originally Answered: What is the loveliest thing your child has ever
 said?
 "Would you like one, Grandpa?"
 OK- it was not my child but my 3-year-old
 granddaughter, but I still think it counts.
 I had read about the marshmallow test. You give a child
 a marshmallow, and then say that if she (Layla, in this
 case) could keep from eating it for 10 minutes, you'll
 give her a second. So I tried that test with my
 granddaughter (not with marshmallows, but with
 chocolate, which she likes much more)
 According to extensive experiments, children who
 "pass" the "marshmallow test" are far more successful
 in later life. They have learned a fundamental truth in
 life, that delayed gratification can lead to a far better
 long-term outcome.
 She sat and watched the chocolate. The 10-minute
 hourglass finally emptied, and she had succeeded. She
 asked for her second piece of chocolate. I gave it to her,
 and she now had two in her hand. That's when she
 looked up at me and asked, "Would you like one,
 Grandpa?"
 Needless to say, from that moment on I would readily
 give my life for her.
 1.3m views View Upvoters View Sharers
hippo-pot:

awesomacious:
The sweetest granddaughter
btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are essentially more likely to trust that they will actually get the marshmallow if they wait whereas poorer kids are generally more used to like, if you have food, eat it. and being wealthier correlates to being more successful later in life because our system is broken. so THAT’s probably why the marshmallow test is a predictor - because it tells you who is wealthy, not who is innately primed to be successful

Classic correlation does not equal causation

hippo-pot: awesomacious: The sweetest granddaughter btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are es...

God, Shit, and True: Why Did God Create Atheists? There is a famous story told in Chassidic literature that addresses this very question. The Master teaches the student that God created everything in the world to be appreciated, since everything is here to teach us a lesson. One clever student asks "What lesson can we learn from atheists? Why did God create them?" The Master responds "God created atheists to teach us the most important lesson of them allthe lesson of true compassion. You see, when an atheist performs and act of charity, visits someone who is sick, helps someone in need, and cares for the world, he is not doing so because of some religious teaching. He does not believe that god commanded him to perform this act. In fact, he does not believe in God at all, so his acts are based on an inner sense of morality. And look at the kindness he can bestow upon others simply because he feels it to be right." "This means," the Master continued "that when someone reaches out to you for help, you should never say 'I pray that God will help you. Instead for the moment, you should become an atheist, imagine that there is no God who can help, and say I will help you." ETA source: Tales of Hasidim Vol. 2 by Mar razairazerci I started reading this and was worried it would be something attacking atheists, or bashing religion, but this makes me really, really happy. naamahdarling imagine that there is no God who can help, and say 'I will help you." Holy shit. Holy shit. Yes. YES. obsessedwithamedot THIS Why God created Atheists
God, Shit, and True: Why Did God Create Atheists?
 There is a famous story told in Chassidic literature that addresses this
 very question. The Master teaches the student that God created
 everything in the world to be appreciated, since everything is here to
 teach us a lesson.
 One clever student asks "What lesson can we learn from atheists? Why
 did God create them?"
 The Master responds "God created atheists to teach us the most
 important lesson of them allthe lesson of true compassion. You see,
 when an atheist performs and act of charity, visits someone who is sick,
 helps someone in need, and cares for the world, he is not doing so
 because of some religious teaching. He does not believe that god
 commanded him to perform this act. In fact, he does not believe in God
 at all, so his acts are based on an inner sense of morality. And look at
 the kindness he can bestow upon others simply because he feels it to
 be right."
 "This means," the Master continued "that when someone reaches out to
 you for help, you should never say 'I pray that God will help you. Instead
 for the moment, you should become an atheist, imagine that there is no
 God who can help, and say I will help you."
 ETA source: Tales of Hasidim Vol. 2 by Mar
 razairazerci
 I started reading this and was worried it would be something attacking
 atheists, or bashing religion, but this makes me really, really happy.
 naamahdarling
 imagine that there is no God who can help, and say 'I will help you."
 Holy shit.
 Holy shit.
 Yes. YES.
 obsessedwithamedot
 THIS
Why God created Atheists

Why God created Atheists

Advice, Django, and Facebook: <?php header("Content-type: text/html; charset=utf-8"); *This is a warning to any poor soul who may have to deal with this code. *I took over this criminal piece of chaos from a monkey named Joel who I assume had been given a typewriter by Mephistopheles himself. For reasons I have yet been unable to fathom, he decided to patch together this thing *using a BaseX setup hardwired into an unfixably broken Manjaro VM, queried by a handwritten plate of uncommented PHP spaghetti fit to feed an army of people with a serious death wish, without any framework or CMS. The very long BaseX script, very long PHP presenter and very long XSLT *stylesheet mostly perform the same heuristic document structuring for different components and are supposed to produce compatible results, but I bet they have mismatches somewhere. *Since Prof. T just wanted a few small functional enhancements, I decided to just patch it and keep the general setup. Unless you were hired to *correct some spelling mistakes, DO NOT FOLLOW IN MY STEPS. Putting up with this simulation of how a goldfish would design a system has literally given me CLINICAL DEPRESSION. This is not an exaggeration, I am writing this after a prolonged medical therapy - mostly successful, thanks for asking, but not fun. I wouldn't wish this code on anybody who isn't a manager at Oracle or Facebook, and therefore give you this sincere advice: *Nuke this. Take the XSLT if you must, and then nuke the app and recreate it *in Django or whatever works for you. I would do it myself, but I risked a relapse simply by opening this file again to write this comment. *Dear brother or sister, I wish you all the luck and strength in the world * and hope it will be enough. Farewell. error_reporting (E_ALL) ; ini_set("display_errors",true); print('<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF - 8 " ?>'."\n") ; ?> I’m getting second thoughts about whether accepting this job was a good idea.
Advice, Django, and Facebook: <?php header("Content-type: text/html; charset=utf-8");
 *This is a warning to any poor soul who may have to deal with this code.
 *I took over this criminal piece of chaos from a monkey named Joel who I
 assume had been given a typewriter by Mephistopheles himself. For reasons
 I have yet been unable to fathom, he decided to patch together this thing
 *using a BaseX setup hardwired into an unfixably broken Manjaro VM, queried
 by a handwritten plate of uncommented PHP spaghetti fit to feed an army
 of people with a serious death wish, without any framework or CMS.
 The very long BaseX script, very long PHP presenter and very long XSLT
 *stylesheet mostly perform the same heuristic document structuring for
 different components and are supposed to produce compatible results, but I
 bet they have mismatches somewhere.
 *Since Prof. T just wanted a few small functional enhancements, I decided
 to just patch it and keep the general setup. Unless you were hired to
 *correct some spelling mistakes, DO NOT FOLLOW IN MY STEPS. Putting up with
 this simulation of how a goldfish would design a system has literally
 given me CLINICAL DEPRESSION. This is not an exaggeration, I am writing
 this after a prolonged medical therapy - mostly successful, thanks for
 asking, but not fun. I wouldn't wish this code on anybody who isn't a
 manager at Oracle or Facebook, and therefore give you this sincere advice:
 *Nuke this. Take the XSLT if you must, and then nuke the app and recreate it
 *in Django or whatever works for you. I would do it myself, but I risked a
 relapse simply by opening this file again to write this comment.
 *Dear brother or sister, I wish you all the luck and strength in the world
 * and hope it will be enough.
 Farewell.
 error_reporting (E_ALL) ;
 ini_set("display_errors",true);
 print('<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF - 8 " ?>'."\n") ; ?>
I’m getting second thoughts about whether accepting this job was a good idea.

I’m getting second thoughts about whether accepting this job was a good idea.