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Bodies , Fire, and Life: WHAT A REAL HERO LOOKS LIKE @dakotameyer0317 On this day in 2009, near Ganjgal, Afghanistan, Marine Corporal Dakota Meyer charged into heavy gunfire multiple times to rescue comrades under attack from the Taliban. Over the course of the six-hour firefight, Meyer killed at least eight Taliban, personally evacuated 12 friendly wounded, and provided cover for another 24 Marines and soldiers. For "his extraordinary heroism, presence of mind amidst chaos and death, and unselfish devotion to his comrades in the face of great danger," Meyer was awarded the Medal of Honor in September 2011. Read his full citation here: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the repeated risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as a member of Marine Embedded Training Team 2-8, Regional Corps Advisory Command 3-7, in Kunar Province, Afghanistan, on 8 September 2009. When the forward element of his combat team began to be hit by intense fire from roughly 50 Taliban insurgents dug-in and concealed on the slopes above Ganjgal village, Corporal Meyer mounted a gun-truck, enlisted a fellow Marine to drive, and raced to attack the ambushers and aid the trapped Marines and Afghan soldiers. During a six-hour firefight, Corporal Meyer single-handedly turned the tide of the battle, saved 36 Marines and soldiers and recovered the bodies of his fallen brothers. Four separate times he fought the kilometer up into the heart of a deadly U-shaped ambush. During the fight he killed at least eight Taliban, personally evacuated 12 friendly wounded, and provided cover for another 24 Marines and soldiers to escape likely death at the hands of a numerically superior and determined foe. On his first foray, his lone vehicle drew machine gun, mortar, rocket grenade and small arms fire while he rescued five wounded soldiers. His second attack disrupted the enemy’s ambush and he evacuated four more wounded Marines. Switching to another gun-truck because his was too damaged they again sped in for a third time, and as turret gunner killed several Taliban attackers at point blank range and suppressed enemy fire so 24 Marines and soldiers could break-out. (Continue in the comments)
Bodies , Fire, and Life: WHAT A REAL HERO LOOKS LIKE @dakotameyer0317 On this day in 2009, near Ganjgal, Afghanistan, Marine Corporal Dakota Meyer charged into heavy gunfire multiple times to rescue comrades under attack from the Taliban. Over the course of the six-hour firefight, Meyer killed at least eight Taliban, personally evacuated 12 friendly wounded, and provided cover for another 24 Marines and soldiers. For "his extraordinary heroism, presence of mind amidst chaos and death, and unselfish devotion to his comrades in the face of great danger," Meyer was awarded the Medal of Honor in September 2011. Read his full citation here: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the repeated risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as a member of Marine Embedded Training Team 2-8, Regional Corps Advisory Command 3-7, in Kunar Province, Afghanistan, on 8 September 2009. When the forward element of his combat team began to be hit by intense fire from roughly 50 Taliban insurgents dug-in and concealed on the slopes above Ganjgal village, Corporal Meyer mounted a gun-truck, enlisted a fellow Marine to drive, and raced to attack the ambushers and aid the trapped Marines and Afghan soldiers. During a six-hour firefight, Corporal Meyer single-handedly turned the tide of the battle, saved 36 Marines and soldiers and recovered the bodies of his fallen brothers. Four separate times he fought the kilometer up into the heart of a deadly U-shaped ambush. During the fight he killed at least eight Taliban, personally evacuated 12 friendly wounded, and provided cover for another 24 Marines and soldiers to escape likely death at the hands of a numerically superior and determined foe. On his first foray, his lone vehicle drew machine gun, mortar, rocket grenade and small arms fire while he rescued five wounded soldiers. His second attack disrupted the enemy’s ambush and he evacuated four more wounded Marines. Switching to another gun-truck because his was too damaged they again sped in for a third time, and as turret gunner killed several Taliban attackers at point blank range and suppressed enemy fire so 24 Marines and soldiers could break-out. (Continue in the comments)

WHAT A REAL HERO LOOKS LIKE @dakotameyer0317 On this day in 2009, near Ganjgal, Afghanistan, Marine Corporal Dakota Meyer charged into heavy...

A Dream, Africa, and Bailey Jay: A Malawian teenager named William Kamkwamba taught himself how to build a windmill out of junk and bring power to his village. He then went on to build a second, larger windmill to power irrigation pumps. He did this all from books he read in the library. Ultrafacts.tumblr.com WHOHAE WIND THE BOY OHARNESS nBryan Mealer Ekeabeth Zunon A ouwd sothond below nd ghzed at thi stranje machinc ultrafacts: William had a dream of bringing electricity and running water to his village. And he was not prepared to wait for politicians or aid groups to do it for him. The need for action was even greater in 2002 following one of Malawi’s worst droughts, which killed thousands of people and left his family on the brink of starvation. Unable to attend school, he kept up his education by using a local library. Fascinated by science, his life changed one day when he picked up a tattered textbook and saw a picture of a windmill. Mr Kamkwamba told the BBC News website: “I was very interested when I saw the windmill could make electricity and pump water. “I thought: ‘That could be a defense against hunger. Maybe I should build one for myself’.” When not helping his family farm maize, he plugged away at his prototype, working by the light of a paraffin lamp in the evenings. But his ingenious project met blank looks in his community of about 200 people. “Many, including my mother, thought I was going crazy,” he recalls. “They had never seen a windmill before.” [x] In 2014, William Kamkwamba received his 4 year degree at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire where he was a student. (Fact Source) For more facts, follow Ultrafacts
A Dream, Africa, and Bailey Jay: A Malawian teenager named William
 Kamkwamba taught himself how to build a
 windmill out of junk and bring power to his
 village. He then went on to build a second,
 larger windmill to power irrigation pumps. He
 did this all from books he read in the library.
 Ultrafacts.tumblr.com

 WHOHAE WIND
 THE BOY
 OHARNESS
 nBryan Mealer
 Ekeabeth Zunon
 A ouwd sothond below nd ghzed at thi stranje machinc
ultrafacts:

William had a dream of bringing electricity and running water to his village. And he was not prepared to wait for politicians or aid groups to do it for him. The need for action was even greater in 2002 following one of Malawi’s worst droughts, which killed thousands of people and left his family on the brink of starvation.
Unable to attend school, he kept up his education by using a local library. Fascinated by science, his life changed one day when he picked up a tattered textbook and saw a picture of a windmill. Mr Kamkwamba told the BBC News website: “I was very interested when I saw the windmill could make electricity and pump water.
“I thought: ‘That could be a defense against hunger. Maybe I should build one for myself’.” When not helping his family farm maize, he plugged away at his prototype, working by the light of a paraffin lamp in the evenings. But his ingenious project met blank looks in his community of about 200 people.
“Many, including my mother, thought I was going crazy,” he recalls. “They had never seen a windmill before.” [x]
In 2014, William Kamkwamba received his 4 year degree at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire where he was a student.
(Fact Source) For more facts, follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts: William had a dream of bringing electricity and running water to his village. And he was not prepared to wait for politicians o...