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Children, Love, and School: EmbraceRace Yesterday at 12:00 PM embracerace Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently. Equality Equity momo-de-avis: aloneindarknes7: calystarose: Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently. This is something that I teach my students during the first week of school and they understand it. Eight year olds can understand this and all it costs is a box of band-aids. I have each students pretend they got hurt and need a band-aid. Children love band-aids. I ask the first one where they are hurt. If he says his finger, I put the band-aid on his finger. Then I ask the second one where they are hurt. No matter what that child says, I put the band-aid on their finger exactly like the first child. I keep doing that through the whole class. No matter where they say their pretend injury is, I do the same thing I did with the first one. After they all have band-aids in the same spot, I ask if that actually helped any of them other than the first child. I say, “Well, I helped all of you the same! You all have one band-aid!” And they’ll try to get me to understand that they were hurt somewhere else. I act like I’m just now understanding it. Then I explain, “There might be moments this year where some of you get different things because you need them differently, just like you needed a band-aid in a different spot.”  If at any time any of my students ask why one student has a different assignment, or gets taken out of the class for a subject, or gets another teacher to come in and help them throughout the year, I remind my students of the band-aids they got at the start of the school year and they stop complaining. That’s why eight year olds can understand equity.  I remember reading somewhere once “we should be speaking of equity instead of equality” and that is a principle that applies here me thinks
Children, Love, and School: EmbraceRace
 Yesterday at 12:00 PM
 embracerace
 Because treating people fairly often means treating
 them differently.
 Equality
 Equity
momo-de-avis:
aloneindarknes7:

calystarose:
Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently.
This is something that I teach my students during the first week of school and they understand it. Eight year olds can understand this and all it costs is a box of band-aids.
I have each students pretend they got hurt and need a band-aid. Children love band-aids. I ask the first one where they are hurt. If he says his finger, I put the band-aid on his finger. Then I ask the second one where they are hurt. No matter what that child says, I put the band-aid on their finger exactly like the first child. I keep doing that through the whole class. No matter where they say their pretend injury is, I do the same thing I did with the first one.
After they all have band-aids in the same spot, I ask if that actually helped any of them other than the first child. I say, “Well, I helped all of you the same! You all have one band-aid!” And they’ll try to get me to understand that they were hurt somewhere else. I act like I’m just now understanding it. Then I explain, “There might be moments this year where some of you get different things because you need them differently, just like you needed a band-aid in a different spot.” 
If at any time any of my students ask why one student has a different assignment, or gets taken out of the class for a subject, or gets another teacher to come in and help them throughout the year, I remind my students of the band-aids they got at the start of the school year and they stop complaining. That’s why eight year olds can understand equity. 


I remember reading somewhere once “we should be speaking of equity instead of equality” and that is a principle that applies here me thinks

momo-de-avis: aloneindarknes7: calystarose: Because treating people fairly often means treating them differently. This is something that I ...

Bad, Definitely, and Fail: jessicameats: brunhiddensmusings: katjohnadams: minusthelove: kingjaffejoffer: Executive chef at a top Thai restaurant tells Gordon Ramsay that his Pad Thai is trash [x] Lmao “what do you want to know from me?” Fuck! So no one thinks that Gordon’s being “Put in his place” or something, this is from Gordon’s show where he specifically goes to places around the world to be schooled in how they do their cuisine and un-fuck the British (Imperialist but we can’t admit that on TV, but he does hint STRONGLY at it in some episodes) way of cooking “exotic” dishes by learning from the people who do it best. That’s the world’s most successful chef putting himself in a position to learn from chefs around the world in world-class restaurants, grandmother’s houses, in a cramped make-shift kitchen on a rocking and speeding steam train, and more. He doesn’t shy away from learning from people who’ve never been in the remote vicinity of a culinary arts school or run a “professional” kitchen. And here he’s showing a chef what he thinks of as Pad Thai and if you don’t think one of the most talented chefs on earth didn’t know he was specifically setting himself up to fail to make a point to his audience, then hopefully you do now! <3  the context- he wasnt saying ‘heres my world famous pad tai for you to sample, a recipe i hold more dear then my own mother’ its closer to  ‘here, this is how i was taught to cook pad tai in liverpool by a man named charles, how far off am i?’ I also think the precise criticism is interesting. The other chef doesn’t say it’s bad. He definitely doesn’t say it’s trash. He doesn’t say it’s a bad meal. What he says is that it’s not pad thai. It’s been labelled as a specific thing and it doesn’t resemble that thing to someone from that culture.
Bad, Definitely, and Fail: jessicameats:

brunhiddensmusings:

katjohnadams:

minusthelove:

kingjaffejoffer:

Executive chef at a top Thai restaurant tells Gordon Ramsay that his Pad Thai is trash [x]

Lmao “what do you want to know from me?” Fuck!

So no one thinks that Gordon’s being “Put in his place” or something, this is from Gordon’s show where he specifically goes to places around the world to be schooled in how they do their cuisine and un-fuck the British (Imperialist but we can’t admit that on TV, but he does hint STRONGLY at it in some episodes) way of cooking “exotic” dishes by learning from the people who do it best.
That’s the world’s most successful chef putting himself in a position to learn from chefs around the world in world-class restaurants, grandmother’s houses, in a cramped make-shift kitchen on a rocking and speeding steam train, and more. He doesn’t shy away from learning from people who’ve never been in the remote vicinity of a culinary arts school or run a “professional” kitchen.
And here he’s showing a chef what he thinks of as Pad Thai and if you don’t think one of the most talented chefs on earth didn’t know he was specifically setting himself up to fail to make a point to his audience, then hopefully you do now! <3 

the context- he wasnt saying ‘heres my world famous pad tai for you to sample, a recipe i hold more dear then my own mother’ its closer to  ‘here, this is how i was taught to cook pad tai in liverpool by a man named charles, how far off am i?’

I also think the precise criticism is interesting. The other chef doesn’t say it’s bad. He definitely doesn’t say it’s trash. He doesn’t say it’s a bad meal. What he says is that it’s not pad thai. It’s been labelled as a specific thing and it doesn’t resemble that thing to someone from that culture.

jessicameats: brunhiddensmusings: katjohnadams: minusthelove: kingjaffejoffer: Executive chef at a top Thai restaurant tells Gordon Ram...