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America, Community, and Future: SUMNER AP/SHUTTERSTOCK Linda Brown, Whose Brown v. Board of Education Case Ended Segregation in Schools, Dies Rest in Power, LindaBrown! 💓✊🏾🙇🏾‍♀️ • • • Linda Brown Thompson, who as a young girl was the student at the center of the landmark Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education that declared school segregation unconstitutional, has died in Topeka, Kansas. She was 76. The Peaceful Rest Funeral Chapel in Topeka confirmed it is handling funeral arrangements for Brown. Born in 1943, Brown was in third grade in 1950 when she was denied admission to an all-white elementary school in her hometown of Topeka. She lived 20 blocks from her segregated school, but just five blocks from the all-white school. Kansas schools at the time were segregated by state law. Brown's father, Rev. Oliver Brown, sued the school district in 1951. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) took up the case, which was combined with segregation suits against school districts in other states when it came before the Supreme Court. Future Supreme Court justice ThurgoodMarshall was the lead attorney for the NAACP. In a unanimous ruling in 1954, the court declared school segregation an unconstitutional violation of the 14th Amendment's guarantee of equal protection under the law. The ruling, written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, struck down the "separate but equal" doctrine that had served as the basis for segregation of public facilities since the 1896 case Plessy v. Ferguson. "Sixty-four years ago a young girl from Topeka brought a case that ended segregation in public schools in America," Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer told the Topeka Capital-Journal. "Linda Brown's life reminds us that sometimes the most unlikely people can have an incredible impact and that by serving our community we can truly change the world." lindabrown brownvsboardofeducation education
America, Community, and Future: SUMNER
 AP/SHUTTERSTOCK
 Linda Brown, Whose Brown
 v. Board of Education Case
 Ended Segregation in
 Schools, Dies
Rest in Power, LindaBrown! 💓✊🏾🙇🏾‍♀️ • • • Linda Brown Thompson, who as a young girl was the student at the center of the landmark Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education that declared school segregation unconstitutional, has died in Topeka, Kansas. She was 76. The Peaceful Rest Funeral Chapel in Topeka confirmed it is handling funeral arrangements for Brown. Born in 1943, Brown was in third grade in 1950 when she was denied admission to an all-white elementary school in her hometown of Topeka. She lived 20 blocks from her segregated school, but just five blocks from the all-white school. Kansas schools at the time were segregated by state law. Brown's father, Rev. Oliver Brown, sued the school district in 1951. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) took up the case, which was combined with segregation suits against school districts in other states when it came before the Supreme Court. Future Supreme Court justice ThurgoodMarshall was the lead attorney for the NAACP. In a unanimous ruling in 1954, the court declared school segregation an unconstitutional violation of the 14th Amendment's guarantee of equal protection under the law. The ruling, written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, struck down the "separate but equal" doctrine that had served as the basis for segregation of public facilities since the 1896 case Plessy v. Ferguson. "Sixty-four years ago a young girl from Topeka brought a case that ended segregation in public schools in America," Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer told the Topeka Capital-Journal. "Linda Brown's life reminds us that sometimes the most unlikely people can have an incredible impact and that by serving our community we can truly change the world." lindabrown brownvsboardofeducation education

Rest in Power, LindaBrown! 💓✊🏾🙇🏾‍♀️ • • • Linda Brown Thompson, who as a young girl was the student at the center of the landmark Supreme Co...

America, Future, and Hulu: moviepass 533% 4359 CASSIE LANGDON Card valid only at MoviePass Theatres BUSINESS NETFLIX FOR MOVIE TIX Mar 23 | MoviePass applies subscription model to movie ticket sales; acquiring 2 million subscribers faster than Netflix, Hulu and Spotify. MoviePass, a movie-ticket subscription service that allows users to attend one movie a day for $6.95 a month (reducing the cost of a single ticket to significantly less than the national average,) is about to surpass 3 million total users in its first 5 months. ___ As streaming services like Netflix and Hulu increase in popularity, movie theaters have been trying to reinvent the theater experience by reimagining the concession counter and making seats more luxurious. Even so, theater attendance did not increase in 2016, and experts are predicting a 4 percent decline in 2017 (a 22-year low). ___ Movie pass provides hope for attendance numbers in the future, even though theater companies are wary of the introduction of the new service. When Lowe announced the plan for the cut-rate subscription service back in August, AMC Entertainment, North America’s largest multiplex operator, released a warning statement saying the company is “not welcome here” and threatening legal action. ___ The ticketing firm was launched by a former founding executive of Netflix, Mitch Lowe. Lowe said in a recent statement, “We’re actually shocked,” adding, “We seem to have hit a nerve in America.” Even though AMC execs are not interested sharing admissions or concessions revenue, Lowe claims the goal of his company is simply “to strive for mutually beneficial relationships.”
America, Future, and Hulu: moviepass
 533% 4359
 CASSIE LANGDON
 Card valid only at MoviePass Theatres
 BUSINESS
 NETFLIX FOR MOVIE TIX
 Mar 23 | MoviePass applies subscription
 model to movie ticket sales; acquiring 2
 million subscribers faster than Netflix, Hulu
 and Spotify.
MoviePass, a movie-ticket subscription service that allows users to attend one movie a day for $6.95 a month (reducing the cost of a single ticket to significantly less than the national average,) is about to surpass 3 million total users in its first 5 months. ___ As streaming services like Netflix and Hulu increase in popularity, movie theaters have been trying to reinvent the theater experience by reimagining the concession counter and making seats more luxurious. Even so, theater attendance did not increase in 2016, and experts are predicting a 4 percent decline in 2017 (a 22-year low). ___ Movie pass provides hope for attendance numbers in the future, even though theater companies are wary of the introduction of the new service. When Lowe announced the plan for the cut-rate subscription service back in August, AMC Entertainment, North America’s largest multiplex operator, released a warning statement saying the company is “not welcome here” and threatening legal action. ___ The ticketing firm was launched by a former founding executive of Netflix, Mitch Lowe. Lowe said in a recent statement, “We’re actually shocked,” adding, “We seem to have hit a nerve in America.” Even though AMC execs are not interested sharing admissions or concessions revenue, Lowe claims the goal of his company is simply “to strive for mutually beneficial relationships.”

MoviePass, a movie-ticket subscription service that allows users to attend one movie a day for $6.95 a month (reducing the cost of a single ...