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News, Phone, and Teacher: priceofliberty Report: 95% Of Grandfathers Got Job By Walking Right Up And Just Asking NEWS WITH VIDEO-Economy Jobs -News IS SUE 50-12-Mar 25, 2014 10 9K 1.4K ผู 49 alking Right Up And skin 73r Fun story my history teacher told us: his grandfather during the industrial revolution walked past a flyer which said "looking for smart strong boys" so he went into the factory, said "i'm strong and smart", and he had that job from age 13 to 78 kaiitea and this is why they expect the younger generation to simply "get a job" ahh it's so much clearer now entwinedmoon act that there's no such thin in, anymore #like the majority of jobs you'd actually want require online applications g as 'just walkin re l (via halffizzbin) Here's another fun story: My boss decided to slap my work phone number on all the ads we post looking for newspaper carriers. So l receive a bunch of calls from people looking for jobs. Working only part time, I'm not usu- ally there when they call, so they have to leave a message and I take their info to pass on to my boss. Sometimes it can be weeks before my boss calls any of these applicants back, if at all. How the callers respond to not getting a callback varies. Most don't do anything, but some call again. If the person sounds young, they may leave another message clarifying their qualifications and reaffirming thein interest. If the person is old, and I can always hear it in their voice, they respond by getting mad, threatening to cancel their newspaper subscription, and occasionally swearing. The older generation is used to getting a callback, and an immediate one, so they throw a tantrum when they don't get what they want. And everyone calls Millennials entitled truckerjbthemd Mind. Blown lesbiantrevorbelmont This is great info, but the way the headline is phrased made it sound like they got the job of being a grandfather by walking right up and just asking Source: priceofliberty Smart Strong Boys
News, Phone, and Teacher: priceofliberty
 Report: 95% Of Grandfathers Got Job By Walking
 Right Up And Just Asking
 NEWS WITH VIDEO-Economy Jobs -News IS SUE 50-12-Mar 25, 2014
 10 9K
 1.4K
 ผู
 49
 alking Right Up And
 skin
 73r
 Fun story my history teacher told us: his
 grandfather during the industrial revolution
 walked past a flyer which said "looking for
 smart strong boys" so he went into the
 factory, said "i'm strong and smart", and he
 had that job from age 13 to 78
 kaiitea
 and this is why they expect the younger
 generation to simply "get a job" ahh it's so
 much clearer now
 entwinedmoon
 act that there's no such thin
 in, anymore #like the majority of jobs you'd
 actually want require online applications
 g as 'just walkin
 re
 l (via
 halffizzbin)
 Here's another fun story: My boss decided to
 slap my work phone number on all the ads
 we post looking for newspaper carriers. So l
 receive a bunch of calls from people looking
 for jobs. Working only part time, I'm not usu-
 ally there when they call, so they have to leave
 a message and I take their info to pass on to
 my boss. Sometimes it can be weeks before
 my boss calls any of these applicants back, if
 at all. How the callers respond to not getting
 a callback varies. Most don't do anything, but
 some call again. If the person sounds young,
 they may leave another message clarifying
 their qualifications and reaffirming thein
 interest. If the person is old, and I can always
 hear it in their voice, they respond by getting
 mad, threatening to cancel their newspaper
 subscription, and occasionally swearing. The
 older generation is used to getting a callback,
 and an immediate one, so they throw a
 tantrum when they don't get what they want.
 And everyone calls Millennials entitled
 truckerjbthemd
 Mind. Blown
 lesbiantrevorbelmont
 This is great info, but the way the headline is
 phrased made it sound like they got the job of
 being a grandfather by walking right up and
 just asking
 Source: priceofliberty
Smart Strong Boys

Smart Strong Boys

College, Dude, and Future: Every graduating senior is scared, to some degree, of the future, but this was on a different level. When my class left our liberal arts experience, we scattered to temporary gigs: I worked at a dude ranch; another friend nannied for the summer; one got a job on a farm in New Zealand; others became raft guides and transitioned to ski instructors. We didn't think our first job was important; it was just a job and would eventually, meanderingly lead to The Job. But these students were convinced that their first job out of college would not only determine their career trajectory, but also their intrinsic value for the rest of their lives. I told one student, whose dozens of internship and fellowship applications yielded no results, that she should move somewhere fun, get any job, and figure out what interests her and what kind of work she doesn't want to do - a suggestion that prompted wailing. "But what'll I tell my parents?" she said. "I want a cool job I'm passionate about!" Those expectations encapsulate the millennial rearing project, in which students internalize the need to find employment that reflects well on their parents (steady, decently paying, recognizable as a "good job") that's also impressive to their peers (at a "cool" company) and fulfills what they've been told has been the end goal of all of this childhood optimization: doing work that you're passionate about. Whether that job is as a professional sports player, a Patagonia social media manager, a programmer at a startup, or a partner at a law firm seems to matter less than checking all of those boxes. What's worse, the feeling of accomplishment that follows an exhausting task passing the final! Finishing the massive work project! - never comes. "The exhaustion experienced in burnout combines an intense yearning for this state of completion with the tormenting sense that it cannot be attained that there is always some demand or anxiety or distraction which can't be silenced," Josh Cohen, a psychoanalyst specializing in burnout, writes. "You josieandthepussycatsofficial: reading this article is like staring into a mirror https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/annehelenpetersen/millennials-burnout-generation-debt-work
College, Dude, and Future: Every graduating senior is scared, to some degree, of the future, but this was
 on a different level. When my class left our liberal arts experience, we
 scattered to temporary gigs: I worked at a dude ranch; another friend
 nannied for the summer; one got a job on a farm in New Zealand; others
 became raft guides and transitioned to ski instructors. We didn't think our
 first job was important; it was just a job and would eventually, meanderingly
 lead to The Job.
 But these students were convinced that their first job out of college would not
 only determine their career trajectory, but also their intrinsic value for the
 rest of their lives. I told one student, whose dozens of internship and
 fellowship applications yielded no results, that she should move somewhere
 fun, get any job, and figure out what interests her and what kind of work she
 doesn't want to do - a suggestion that prompted wailing. "But what'll I tell
 my parents?" she said. "I want a cool job I'm passionate about!"

 Those expectations encapsulate the millennial rearing project, in which
 students internalize the need to find employment that reflects well on their
 parents (steady, decently paying, recognizable as a "good job") that's also
 impressive to their peers (at a "cool" company) and fulfills what they've been
 told has been the end goal of all of this childhood optimization: doing work
 that you're passionate about. Whether that job is as a professional sports
 player, a Patagonia social media manager, a programmer at a startup, or a
 partner at a law firm seems to matter less than checking all of those boxes.

 What's worse, the feeling of accomplishment that follows an exhausting task
 passing the final! Finishing the massive work project! - never comes. "The
 exhaustion experienced in burnout combines an intense yearning for this
 state of completion with the tormenting sense that it cannot be attained
 that there is always some demand or anxiety or distraction which can't be
 silenced," Josh Cohen, a psychoanalyst specializing in burnout, writes. "You
josieandthepussycatsofficial:

reading this article is like staring into a mirror
https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/annehelenpetersen/millennials-burnout-generation-debt-work

josieandthepussycatsofficial: reading this article is like staring into a mirror https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/annehelenpetersen/mil...