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Af, Ass, and Big Dick: fleur-cannnon: afairlypudgycat: whiskeyworen: jaxblade: norseminuteman: red-faced-wolf: kasaron: bears-for-the-bear-god: the-goddamn-doomguy: captainsnoop: big dick energy Exactly the kind of response Doomguy should get when he walks into a room with other humans. This is genuinely beyond big dick energy It’s honestly Argent Phallus Energy (APE) Holy shit Everyone is talking about key-card guy, but my favorite is the dude who tries to hide behind his swivel chair. Babe, babe, No, Doomguy jumps dick first into hell portals on an hourly basis and pops berserker power ups like your mom pops xanax. That chair aint doin SHIT.  Also I love how they don’t just seem to be afraid of the fact that the apex predator of the Legions of Armageddon just walked in. They are acting like they think he might attack them, because you know the UAC has waged a serious PR war against Doom-Chad while he’s been kicking ass on Mars/Hell.   ALPHA AF!!! I just love the fact that DoomGuy spots the keycard on the dude’s lanyard, and instead of doing a vicious yank, or simply snapping it off the lanyard like he always does, he very, VERY carefully takes it, and slowly pulls the dude to the scanner, before letting him go.For a dude filled with eternal rage and seething violence, that was remarkably polite of him. It was almost his “…Excuse me. I require this. Pardon my reach.”Then that poor marine. “Hey YOU! You can’t… be… here…” DoomGuy just casually approaches, looks at him, looks at his gun, and then still remarkably politely, just takes it. Doesn’t wrench it away, or kill the guy, or anything violent. Just reaches out and retrieves it. Again, like “You are doing a fine job. That’s a fine weapon. Mind if I see it? *takes it and walks away*”It’s as if he’s being very, VERY careful not to harm normal humans (or whatever augmented humans those armored marines qualify as), saving his violence specifically for the Daemonic.Kinda supports my idea that DoomGuy isn’t neccessarily a bloodthirsty raging psycho. He’s a guy who has seen so much, done SO MUCH… that he’s calm. He’s so far beyond wrath at the demons that he’s entered a weird Calm and just LIVES there. Nothing shakes him of it. He doesn’t grunt, he doesn’t yell, he doesn’t scream, he just breathes and moves on. New demon? Well, it’ll bleed like the last. He doesn’t revel in combat, he just moves through it like walking through air; it’s a function of existence for him. Doomguy dissociating 100% of the time Within the first few minutes of Doom 2016 and throughout much of the remainder of the game it’s clear that Doomguy values human life A LOT. Humans are never his enemy, it’s the demons. He looks at the dead man in the elevator as Hayden says something along the lines of “I swear it was for the greater good.” Doomguy sees right in front of him it wasn’t, and I betcha right then Doomguy was against Hayden. Doomguy doesn’t take kindly to crimes against humanity, even if accidental.
Af, Ass, and Big Dick: fleur-cannnon:

afairlypudgycat:

whiskeyworen:

jaxblade:

norseminuteman:

red-faced-wolf:

kasaron:


bears-for-the-bear-god:

the-goddamn-doomguy:

captainsnoop:
big dick energy
Exactly the kind of response Doomguy should get when he walks into a room with other humans.


This is genuinely beyond big dick energy

It’s honestly Argent Phallus Energy (APE)


Holy shit 

Everyone is talking about key-card guy, but my favorite is the dude who tries to hide behind his swivel chair. Babe, babe, No, Doomguy jumps dick first into hell portals on an hourly basis and pops berserker power ups like your mom pops xanax. That chair aint doin SHIT. 
Also I love how they don’t just seem to be afraid of the fact that the apex predator of the Legions of Armageddon just walked in. They are acting like they think he might attack them, because you know the UAC has waged a serious PR war against Doom-Chad while he’s been kicking ass on Mars/Hell.  

ALPHA AF!!!

I just love the fact that DoomGuy spots the keycard on the dude’s lanyard, and instead of doing a vicious yank, or simply snapping it off the lanyard like he always does, he very, VERY carefully takes it, and slowly pulls the dude to the scanner, before letting him go.For a dude filled with eternal rage and seething violence, that was remarkably polite of him. It was almost his “…Excuse me. I require this. Pardon my reach.”Then that poor marine. “Hey YOU! You can’t… be… here…” DoomGuy just casually approaches, looks at him, looks at his gun, and then still remarkably politely, just takes it. Doesn’t wrench it away, or kill the guy, or anything violent. Just reaches out and retrieves it. Again, like “You are doing a fine job. That’s a fine weapon. Mind if I see it? *takes it and walks away*”It’s as if he’s being very, VERY careful not to harm normal humans (or whatever augmented humans those armored marines qualify as), saving his violence specifically for the Daemonic.Kinda supports my idea that DoomGuy isn’t neccessarily a bloodthirsty raging psycho. He’s a guy who has seen so much, done SO MUCH… that he’s calm. He’s so far beyond wrath at the demons that he’s entered a weird Calm and just LIVES there. Nothing shakes him of it. He doesn’t grunt, he doesn’t yell, he doesn’t scream, he just breathes and moves on. New demon? Well, it’ll bleed like the last. He doesn’t revel in combat, he just moves through it like walking through air; it’s a function of existence for him.

Doomguy dissociating 100% of the time


Within the first few minutes of Doom 2016 and throughout much of the remainder of the game it’s clear that Doomguy values human life A LOT. Humans are never his enemy, it’s the demons. He looks at the dead man in the elevator as Hayden says something along the lines of “I swear it was for the greater good.” Doomguy sees right in front of him it wasn’t, and I betcha right then Doomguy was against Hayden. Doomguy doesn’t take kindly to crimes against humanity, even if accidental.

fleur-cannnon: afairlypudgycat: whiskeyworen: jaxblade: norseminuteman: red-faced-wolf: kasaron: bears-for-the-bear-god: the-goddam...

Amazon, Facebook, and Family: Agriculture Nature bogleech: revretch: awed-frog: Prairies are some of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with the tallgrass prairie being the most endangered. Only 1-4% of tallgrass prairie still exists. Prairies are critically important, not only for the unique biodiversity they possess, but for their effect on climate. The ability to store carbon is a valuable ecological service in today’s changing climate. Carbon, which is emitted both naturally and by human activities such as burning coal to create electricity, is a greenhouse gas that is increasing in the Earth’s atmosphere. Reports from the International Panel on Climate Change, a group of more than 2,000 climate scientists from around the world, agree that increased greenhouse gases are causing climate change, which is leading to sea level rise, higher temperatures, and altered rain patterns. Most of the prairie’s carbon sequestration happens below ground, where prairie roots can dig into the soil to depths up to 15 feet and more. Prairies can store much more carbon below ground than a forest can store above ground. In fact, the prairie was once the largest carbon sink in the world-much bigger than the Amazon rainforest-and its destruction has had devastating effects. [source] I just have to add–that extensive root system? It’s not just how the plant eats, and how it keeps itself from getting pulled out of the ground during storms, or dying when its aboveground portion is eaten… it’s how it talks to its friends and family, how it shares food with its friends and family, and more than likely, how it thinks. That’s a whole plant brain we’ve domesticated away, leaving a helpless organism that has trouble figuring out when it’s under attack by pests, what to do about it, has very little in the way of chemical defense so it can do something about it, and can’t even warn its neighbors. Even apart from the ecological concerns, what we’ve done is honestly pretty cruel. Here’s some more articles on this too!https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/may/02/plants-talk-to-each-other-through-their-rootshttp://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20141111-plants-have-a-hidden-internethttps://www.the-scientist.com/features/plant-talk-38209Whether or not you think this should qualify as a form of “intelligence” as we know it (which in itself as a pretty nebulous and poorly defined thing), plants exhibit complicated interactive behaviors that help them grow and thrive, and the way we harvest a lot of them for our produce just doesn’t even give them a chance to reach their maturity and begin trading nutrients the way they’re supposed to.
Amazon, Facebook, and Family: Agriculture
 Nature
bogleech:

revretch:
awed-frog:



Prairies are some of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with the tallgrass prairie being the most endangered. Only 1-4% of tallgrass prairie still exists. Prairies are critically important, not only for the unique biodiversity they possess, but for their effect on climate. The ability to store carbon is a valuable ecological service in today’s changing climate. Carbon, which is emitted both naturally and by human activities such as burning coal to create electricity, is a greenhouse gas that is increasing in the Earth’s atmosphere. Reports from the International Panel on Climate Change, a group of more than 2,000 climate scientists from around the world, agree that increased greenhouse gases are causing climate change, which is leading to sea level rise, higher temperatures, and altered rain patterns. Most of the prairie’s carbon sequestration happens below ground, where prairie roots can dig into the soil to depths up to 15 feet and more. Prairies can store much more carbon below ground than a forest can store above ground. In fact, the prairie was once the largest carbon sink in the world-much bigger than the Amazon rainforest-and its destruction has had devastating effects.


[source]

I just have to add–that extensive root system? It’s not just how the plant eats, and how it keeps itself from getting pulled out of the ground during storms, or dying when its aboveground portion is eaten… it’s how it talks to its friends and family, how it shares food with its friends and family, and more than likely, how it thinks. That’s a whole plant brain we’ve domesticated away, leaving a helpless organism that has trouble figuring out when it’s under attack by pests, what to do about it, has very little in the way of chemical defense so it can do something about it, and can’t even warn its neighbors. Even apart from the ecological concerns, what we’ve done is honestly pretty cruel.

Here’s some more articles on this too!https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/may/02/plants-talk-to-each-other-through-their-rootshttp://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20141111-plants-have-a-hidden-internethttps://www.the-scientist.com/features/plant-talk-38209Whether or not you think this should qualify as a form of “intelligence” as we know it (which in itself as a pretty nebulous and poorly defined thing), plants exhibit complicated interactive behaviors that help them grow and thrive, and the way we harvest a lot of them for our produce just doesn’t even give them a chance to reach their maturity and begin trading nutrients the way they’re supposed to.

bogleech: revretch: awed-frog: Prairies are some of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, with the tallgrass prairie being the mo...

America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care: The infamous $629 bandaid Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US Just… facility fees Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis) Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x) People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely)
America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded
 SJPeace
 The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A
 first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat
 We need Universal Healthcare!
 RETWEET THIS
 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it.
 But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it.
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android
 1.9K Retweets
 3.6K Likes

 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it
 But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 down
 By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept
 trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was
 dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs
 of abating
 At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew
 had to go to the hospital
 I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different
 Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able
 to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost
 me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't
 qualify for Taiwanese NHI)

 My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to
 the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by
 an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given
 IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did
 an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or
 appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a
 particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis
 (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I
 began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and
 my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with
 a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication.
 Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am
 now pretty much back to normal
 The bill for the ER visit?
 US$80.00
 Eighty. American. Dollars
 Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance.
 At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan.
 And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that.
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money.
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
corvussy:
thatpettyblackgirl:


the US has no excuse


some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care:

The infamous $629 bandaid
Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section
Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill
Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD
Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills

A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices


Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices
Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise
Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US
Just… facility fees


Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis)
Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x)

People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely)

corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care:...

America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse
America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded
 SJPeace
 The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A
 first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat
 We need Universal Healthcare!
 RETWEET THIS
 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it.
 But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it.
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android
 1.9K Retweets
 3.6K Likes

 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it
 But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 down
 By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept
 trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was
 dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs
 of abating
 At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew
 had to go to the hospital
 I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different
 Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able
 to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost
 me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't
 qualify for Taiwanese NHI)

 My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to
 the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by
 an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given
 IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did
 an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or
 appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a
 particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis
 (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I
 began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and
 my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with
 a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication.
 Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am
 now pretty much back to normal
 The bill for the ER visit?
 US$80.00
 Eighty. American. Dollars
 Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance.
 At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan.
 And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that.
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money.
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
thatpettyblackgirl:

the US has no excuse

thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse

America, Android, and Bad: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they fixed me up good and quickly. I was shocked when my entire emergency visit didn’t cost me anything. In the U.S, an unexpected hospital visit can easily cost you MORE than a month’s rent. people literally lose their homes trying to pay medical bills that even a small fraction of our military budget could easily cover.the thing is, we have weapon industry lobbyists. we don’t have lobbyists or big money advocating for the average citizen. right now, money is more important than people and that needs to change Same goes for Germany.Accessible Healthcare for everyone.The patient is more important than the money
America, Android, and Bad: StanceGrounded
 SJPeace
 The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A
 first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat
 We need Universal Healthcare!
 RETWEET THIS
 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it.
 But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it.
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android
 1.9K Retweets
 3.6K Likes

 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it
 But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 down
 By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept
 trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was
 dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs
 of abating
 At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew
 had to go to the hospital
 I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different
 Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able
 to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost
 me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't
 qualify for Taiwanese NHI)

 My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to
 the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by
 an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given
 IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did
 an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or
 appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a
 particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis
 (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I
 began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and
 my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with
 a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication.
 Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am
 now pretty much back to normal
 The bill for the ER visit?
 US$80.00
 Eighty. American. Dollars
 Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance.
 At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan.
 And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that.
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money.
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
smallest-feeblest-boggart:

thatpettyblackgirl:

the US has no excuse



I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they fixed me up good and quickly. I was shocked when my entire emergency visit didn’t cost me anything. In the U.S, an unexpected hospital visit can easily cost you MORE than a month’s rent. people literally lose their homes trying to pay medical bills that even a small fraction of our military budget could easily cover.the thing is, we have weapon industry lobbyists. we don’t have lobbyists or big money advocating for the average citizen. right now, money is more important than people and that needs to change

Same goes for Germany.Accessible Healthcare for everyone.The patient is more important than the money

smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they f...

Alive, America, and Anaconda: can do it TO DO LIST corbinalexanderwealthguidance: CORBIN ALEXANDER WEALLTH GUIDANCE:  POSTED 05/06/2018 STARTING OUT FROM SCRATCH – POST #1 IN MY SERIES BUDGETING: 50/30/20/RULE: For the person already living life, this is an essential rule of thumb: -          50% to Needs:  utilities, rent, food, car insurance (never buy a car on credit/payments and be  required to pay collision coverage:  only buy a used, 3-8 year old, Honda/Kia/Toyota for the best value/bang for your buck), gas, clothes allowance, etc.  Essentials needed to live! -          20% to Savings Investment:   used to pay bank loans/student loans, monthly deposits into a retirement account and an investment account, credit card payments (pay off the entire balance each month and not just the minimum payment to avoid paying interest on interest = that’s what eats you alive causing you to NEVER pay off the balance(s)) and never buy stuff from Fingerhut/Rent-A-Center or the like…..the interest on this stuff is outrageous and you pay 3x-5x what the item is actually worth in the end – if you ever get to the end of the payments! -          30% to Wants:  vacations (limit one per year – do day trips for the other week taken on paid vacation benefits) and future “Wants” such as saving for a house:  if you need the monies in less than 5 years, then bank it – if you need the monies in over 8 years, then invest it; that is the industry rule of thumb when it comes to “Wants”. Two methods to keep you on track:  -          The spread sheet method:  this is where you track your budget in MS Excel.  -    The envelope method:  this is where you assign envelopes labeled by each expense.   EMERGECY FUND:   This where you have a bank savings account holding a minimum of six months of expenses to pay “all” your monthly bills in the event of a job lose or an illness:  you are NEVER to dip into this unless you are in a dire straight situation.   Establish this fund FIRST before all other suggestions are followed.   SAVINGS INVESTMENT:   -          Start saving for an emergency fund first. -          Do not use the Overdraft protection feature on your bank debit card = avoid getting into the habit of paying Overdraft charges over and over again!  But do have it on the account – in the event of an emergency = like your car breaks down, etc. and avoid using a credit card and carry a balance. -          Start an investment account at Ally.com/invest and invest in my Model ETF Portfolio that I’ll outline at a later date…stay tuned! -          Start investing in my ”ALL PURPOSE” Model Mutual Fund Portfolio: starting in your mid-50’s/early 60’s. -          Start investing in my designated Model Mutual Fund 80+ Portfolio in your 80’s; exact allocation percentages to also be revealed at a later date! CREDIT CARDS/BANKING MANAGEMENT:  -          Establish a credit history at 18 years old before working a full-time 9-5 or going to college:  now is the time to obtain a pre-paid debt card through Capital One.com or a similar lender.   And do not forget to get a small personal loan ($1,000.00 minimum) at a local bank using a co-signer to qualify for the loan.  As you SLOWLY establish a credit history; apply for a no-fee/low credit limit card through Discover.com and/or Capital One.com.   HAVE YOU RUN UP YOUR CREDIT CARDS TO THE MAX AND DROWNING IN DEBT OVERALL? – CONSIDER CLAIMING BANKRUPTCY AND START OVER – JUST BE CAREFUL; DON’T SCREW UP AGAIN LIKE THE LAST TIME.   -          Earn interest in an interest-bearing savings or CD account:               Not all banks are created equal; which is why most are banking wrong:                 BANK OF AMERICA:  This is a “fee city” bank.  You name it, they have a fee attached TD BANK:  This is a bank with convoluted morals.  Good luck banking in this environment; more horseshit then you can shake a stick at!    -   If your balance falls below $100.00 at TD at any given time during the month; they hit you with a $15.00 low balance fee ($180.00 a year!). You are better off going to a local bank or a federal credit union for your banking needs. BE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR MY NEXT SERIES INSTALLMENT POST ON 6/3/2018!
Alive, America, and Anaconda: can
 do it
 TO DO LIST
corbinalexanderwealthguidance:
CORBIN ALEXANDER WEALLTH
GUIDANCE:  POSTED 05/06/2018
STARTING OUT FROM SCRATCH – POST #1 IN MY SERIES
BUDGETING:
50/30/20/RULE:
For the person already living life, this is an essential
rule of thumb:
-         
50% to Needs:  utilities, rent, food, car insurance (never buy a car on credit/payments and be  required to pay collision coverage:  only buy a used, 3-8 year old, Honda/Kia/Toyota for the best value/bang for your buck),
gas, clothes allowance, etc.  Essentials needed to live!
-         
20% to Savings
 Investment:   used to pay bank
loans/student loans, monthly deposits into a retirement account and an investment
account, credit card payments (pay off the entire balance each month and not
just the minimum payment to avoid paying interest on interest = that’s what
eats you alive causing you to NEVER
pay off the balance(s)) and never buy stuff from Fingerhut/Rent-A-Center or the
like…..the interest on this stuff is outrageous and you pay 3x-5x what the item
is actually worth in the end – if you ever get to the end of the payments!
-         
30% to Wants:  vacations (limit one per year – do day trips
for the other week taken on paid vacation benefits) and future “Wants” such as
saving for a house:  if you need the
monies in less than 5 years, then bank it – if you need the monies in over 8
years, then invest it; that is the industry rule of thumb when it comes to “Wants”.
Two methods to keep you on track:
 -         
The spread sheet method:  this is where you track your budget in MS
Excel.
 -    The envelope method:  this is where you assign envelopes labeled by
each expense.   
EMERGECY FUND:  
This where you have a bank savings
account holding a minimum of six months of expenses to pay “all” your monthly bills in the event of
a job lose or an illness:  you are NEVER to dip into this unless you are
in a dire straight situation.  
Establish this fund FIRST before all other suggestions are followed.
 
SAVINGS  INVESTMENT:   
-         
Start saving for an emergency fund first.
-         
Do not
use the Overdraft protection feature on your bank debit card = avoid getting
into the habit of paying Overdraft charges over and over again!  But do have it on the account – in the event
of an emergency = like your car breaks down, etc. and avoid using a credit card
and carry a balance.
-         
Start an investment account at Ally.com/invest
and invest in my Model ETF Portfolio that I’ll outline at a later date…stay tuned!
-         
Start investing in my ”ALL PURPOSE” Model Mutual Fund Portfolio: starting in your mid-50’s/early
60’s.
-         
Start investing in my designated Model Mutual
Fund 80+ Portfolio in your 80’s; exact allocation percentages to also be
revealed at a later date!

CREDIT
CARDS/BANKING MANAGEMENT:
 -         
Establish a credit history at 18 years old
before working a full-time 9-5 or going to college:  now is the time to obtain a pre-paid debt
card through Capital One.com or a
similar lender.   And do not forget to
get a small personal loan ($1,000.00 minimum) at a local bank using a co-signer to qualify for the loan.
 As you SLOWLY
establish a credit history; apply for a no-fee/low credit limit card through Discover.com and/or Capital One.com.
 
HAVE
YOU RUN UP YOUR CREDIT CARDS TO THE MAX AND DROWNING IN DEBT OVERALL? –
CONSIDER CLAIMING BANKRUPTCY AND START OVER – JUST BE CAREFUL; DON’T SCREW UP
AGAIN LIKE THE LAST TIME.
 
-         
Earn interest in an interest-bearing savings or
CD account:
               Not all
banks are created equal; which is why most are banking wrong:   
               BANK
OF AMERICA:  This is a “fee city”
bank.  You name it, they have a fee
attached
TD
BANK:  This is a bank with convoluted
morals.  Good luck banking in this
environment; more horseshit then you can shake a stick
at!  
 -   If your balance falls below $100.00 at TD at any
given time during the month; they hit you with a $15.00 low balance fee
($180.00 a year!).
You
are better off going to a local bank or a federal credit union for your banking
needs.
BE ON THE LOOKOUT
FOR MY NEXT SERIES INSTALLMENT POST ON 6/3/2018!

corbinalexanderwealthguidance: CORBIN ALEXANDER WEALLTH GUIDANCE:  POSTED 05/06/2018 STARTING OUT FROM SCRATCH – POST #1 IN MY SERIES BUDGET...

America, Anaconda, and Bernie Sanders: Bernie Sanders @SenSanders There's no state where a full-time minimum wage worker can afford a one-bedroom apartment at the fair market rent. That's unacceptable. 4/10/17, 3:51 PM 5,379 RETWEETS 14.2K LIKES pidgepitchu: strict-constitutionalist: constitutioncutie: Minimum wage: $7.25 $7.25 x 40 hour full time work week: $290 $290 x 4 weeks per month: $1,160 In every Southern state (didn’t have time to look at the rest of the country) you can find some sort of studio apartment for around $500 per month, sometimes less than that. Why bother lying about something so easily disproven?  Because Bernie Sanders supporters aren’t going to fact check him, and they’ll ignore any contrary evidence that’s presented to them anyways. Things like this really tick me off and It’s not political or anything but it’s the fact that you think all that money is there. Here’s what I mean; That weekly check comes to, according to you, 290. Most places DO NOT pay for your half hour lunch that is required by law. So your beginning number was wrong. $7.25 x 7.5 hours a day x 5 days a week only gets you $271.88.  Most people in America get paid bi-weekly, so let’s double it to get the budget. $543.75. That’s GROSS, not NET. Out of that comes anywhere between 10% and 15% taxes depending on state so we’ll low ball it at 10%. Automatically down to $489.38 a pay check. Now health insurance. Usually anywhere from 70-100 a pay check for the cheapest plans. Again, we’ll low ball and go $70. So now we have $419.39 a paycheck. x 2  = $839.  Eight hundred thirty nine dollars. A MONTH. But again, you seem to think that’s fair. So let’s proceed. You say rent is $500? Okay. This person now has $339 left to buy groceries for the whole month, pay utilities, car payment, car insurance, and gas money to get to work.  Those are the bare needs. You have to eat. You have to pay for heat, water, garbage removal, gas and or electricity because apartments do not always include things and rarely all of the above. Most cities in America do not have public transportation. Mine doesn’t despite the fact that our population is over 15,000 people, not counting a taxi. If you have a car, you have to pay that. If you have a car, legally you have to have car insurance. You have to pay that. You have to have gas in that car to get to work to make that money. Now if you can tell me you can get all of that out of $339 you’re lying. You are so focused on rent that you aren’t thinking about everything else people have to pay for. Rent was an example. This is a breakdown of the budget you gave me and it’s not possible to live off that in 2017 America.  And BECAUSE this person makes over $800 a month, they probably won’t qualify for financial aid or food stamps. $800 is the line in my state where they won’t help you. No food stamps, financial aid, or government housing if you make more than $800 a month.  Why does it bother you that people deserve to live above the poverty line?
America, Anaconda, and Bernie Sanders: Bernie Sanders
 @SenSanders
 There's no state where a full-time
 minimum wage worker can afford a
 one-bedroom apartment at the fair
 market rent. That's unacceptable.
 4/10/17, 3:51 PM
 5,379 RETWEETS 14.2K LIKES
pidgepitchu:

strict-constitutionalist:

constitutioncutie:


Minimum wage: $7.25
$7.25 x 40 hour full time work week: $290
$290 x 4 weeks per month: $1,160
In every Southern state (didn’t have time to look at the rest of the country) you can find some sort of studio apartment for around $500 per month, sometimes less than that. Why bother lying about something so easily disproven? 


Because Bernie Sanders supporters aren’t going to fact check him, and they’ll ignore any contrary evidence that’s presented to them anyways.

Things like this really tick me off and It’s not political or anything but it’s the fact that you think all that money is there. Here’s what I mean;
That weekly check comes to, according to you, 290. Most places DO NOT pay for your half hour lunch that is required by law. So your beginning number was wrong. $7.25 x 7.5 hours a day x 5 days a week only gets you $271.88. 

 Most people in America get paid bi-weekly, so let’s double it to get the budget. $543.75. That’s GROSS, not NET. Out of that comes anywhere between 10% and 15% taxes depending on state so we’ll low ball it at 10%. Automatically down to $489.38 a pay check. Now health insurance. Usually anywhere from 70-100 a pay check for the cheapest plans. Again, we’ll low ball and go $70. So now we have $419.39 a paycheck. x 2  = $839. 
Eight hundred thirty nine dollars. A MONTH.
But again, you seem to think that’s fair. So let’s proceed. You say rent is $500? Okay. This person now has $339 left to buy groceries for the whole month, pay utilities, car payment, car insurance, and gas money to get to work. 
Those are the bare needs. You have to eat. You have to pay for heat, water, garbage removal, gas and or electricity because apartments do not always include things and rarely all of the above. Most cities in America do not have public transportation. Mine doesn’t despite the fact that our population is over 15,000 people, not counting a taxi. If you have a car, you have to pay that. If you have a car, legally you have to have car insurance. You have to pay that. You have to have gas in that car to get to work to make that money.
Now if you can tell me you can get all of that out of $339 you’re lying.
You are so focused on rent that you aren’t thinking about everything else people have to pay for. Rent was an example. This is a breakdown of the budget you gave me and it’s not possible to live off that in 2017 America. 
And BECAUSE this person makes over $800 a month, they probably won’t qualify for financial aid or food stamps. $800 is the line in my state where they won’t help you. No food stamps, financial aid, or government housing if you make more than $800 a month. 
Why does it bother you that people deserve to live above the poverty line?

pidgepitchu: strict-constitutionalist: constitutioncutie: Minimum wage: $7.25 $7.25 x 40 hour full time work week: $290 $290 x 4 weeks p...

Anna, Brains, and Church: SKILL HARD WORK TO ACHIEVE A LEVEL OF SKILL IN ANYTHING YOU HAVE TO STAND ON A PILLAR OF HARD WORK. OH, I JUST STARTED HERE TALENT & I HARD WORK TALENTHARD WORK owLTURD.com violent-darts: charlesoberonn: jelloapocalypse: These bother me sometimes. We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ticket that makes them better at anything. If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”. I will qualify this a small but I think important amount, because what it is is actually complicated:  Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better hand-eye coordination. Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better pattern recognition. Or translations of audio input. Or whatever.  What this does is combine with @jelloapocalypse‘s EXTREMELY WELL-OBSERVED COMMENT (If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”.) in a way that can be both invisible and give this kind of person a massive leg up while being really discouraging to someone who doesn’t have that wiring.  It doesn’t get to the actual original comic’s level of “oh I just started here”. But let’s take two people called Riley and Kennedy, and we’ll do singing, since that’s what I teach.  Riley and Kennedy have exactly the same kind of background: parents who listen to the radio sometimes, the usual social stuff around popular music of whatever genre, etc, but no formal training. Neither of them sings in a church choir, neither of them falls into a formal disability category, whatever.  The first time Riley shows up in my studio and we sing a really simple song I use as a diagnostic, she gets it mostly right. She can follow the tune; she can hear pitch, and it takes very little work for her to chivvy her voice into matching that pitch as long as there’s not something pulling her off. (In other words: as long as I’m singing the same notes as her and playing them on the piano, and as long a she can hear both herself and those notes).  For Riley the lesson is really fun and validating and she goes home and sings along to her own music for a while and comes back next week with six songs she wants to try learning. And most of her lessons are like that: pretty easy positive feedback. That means Riley “practices” a lot in exactly the way @jelloapocalypse describes, even if she doesn’t think she’s actually practicing (that is, sitting down to sing the songs we’re working on together in a systematic way) at all.  In contrast, the first time Kennedy comes to my studio, she struggles. It’s harder for her to hear the difference between notes, and it’s much harder for her to make her voice actually match the pitch she wants to sing at. When we pull out the diagnostic tune, she mostly manages to drone a few clusters of semi-tones, and while she can hear that she’s Off, it’s actually very hard for her to tell HOW she’s off, or what she should do to correct it.  In most cases, for Kennedy, lessons - and in fact the overall experience of singing - is not fun. It’s not validating. It’s a whole process of Not Being Good, of Doing Things Wrong, and given the way humans are often in casual situations being laughed at. When Kennedy goes home she doesn’t sing along with any music she plays: she keeps her lips pressed together and at best enjoys other people singing (and maybe feels envious and demeaned because she can’t do it).  Now the thing is, the practical “skill” difference for Riley and Kennedy here at the beginning is minimal. But the Rileys will tend (if they like what they’re doing) to ROCKET UP THE SKILL LEVEL, because of the “practice is fun so it’s just the thing I do” - because there is always a bunch of validation and positive reinforcement in the act of doing whatever it is, be it doodling or singing or math.  The Kennedys won’t. In fact if they’re not lucky enough to have a good teacher, and one who can put a lot of this into perspective for them, they will tend to be inhibited. The worst time is when a Riley and a Kennedy are friends and sign up to learn together, and Riley takes off and Kennedy’s left sitting there feeling like she’s somehow Deeply Flawed.   And in fact the whole Doctrine of “It’s Just About How Hard You Work” will in and of itself become part of what inhibits them, because they will watch the Rileys - and even the Annas, Anna in this metaphor being the Totally Normal Student who never really exists - grasp things faster than they do, even if they ARE working hard. And this will HAPPEN. They will watch this reality happen in front of them … and then people say to them “oh, it’s all about how hard you work, dear.” And it’s like being gaslit. (Well, to be fair: it IS being gaslit, just without malice intended on the part of the people doing it.)  And that message is horribly horribly toxic: here Kennedy is, and she IS working hard, but she’s still not progressing as fast as Riley or Anna no matter what she does! But it’s All About Hard Work, right? So that must mean that no matter how hard she THINKS she’s working, she’s actually just lazy, or doesn’t want it enough. It’s clearly a moral flaw in her.  I actually have, personally, really good luck with teaching the Kennedys because I literally have this conversation with them when they come to my studio. I actually outright tell them: firstly, anyone who has working vocal chords can sing. Anyone who has working vocal chords and the ability to distinguish audio pitch can even sing on key in tune! But some people have an easy time learning this and some people have a hard time, and sometimes which it is has some relationship to, say, “early exposure to music” or whatever but sometimes it seems to be utterly fucking random - pure luck of the draw.  You CAN SING. The capability is there. And if you want to we will find out how to make it happen. It might not happen as fast as for some other person, it might take more work, it might take more care, but that’s okay: that’s not your fault, that doesn’t mean you’re NOT working hard, but it does mean that here at the beginning we do things like recalibrate victories, we make your progress about YOU, not about Riley or Anna.  But I’m also not going to gaslight you or make you feel like you’re either delusional or somehow especially So Terrible You Don’t Fit In The Rest Of The World: sure, I’ve got some Riley-types who walk in here, noodle around, and we go on to Art Songs. They exist.  So what? Tall people exist. People with broad shoulders exist. People with dark hair exist. Physical embodiment and neurology hand out luck of the genetic roulette with no interest in outcomes. If you’re born blonde, it’s always going to take more work for you to have brown hair than someone born with brown hair, but much like dyeing your hair to match what you want, we can train the muscles of your voice and the neural pathways for hearing to do what you want.  The differences between Rileys and Kennedys are very small. If Riley didn’t discover she liked singing and Kennedy worked at it for years then no, Riley would not “start out” as good as Kennedy is after those years. And you can be Riley and if you DON’T do the fucking work, the Annas of the world especially will blast past you and leave you in the dust.  But on the other hand the Rileys get this wonderful cycle of positive reinforcement that does often start from a place of their coincidental physical embodiment giving them a slight leg up. And pretending that’s not the case does a big disservice to the Kennedys.  We just absolutely do need to reframe that for what it is (a tiny fundamental difference and then a HELL OF A LOT OF “this is fun so I practice more so I get more validation so I -” and more or less no moral meaning at all), what it doesn’t mean, and how to compensate for it. 
Anna, Brains, and Church: SKILL
 HARD
 WORK
 TO ACHIEVE A LEVEL
 OF SKILL IN ANYTHING
 YOU HAVE TO STAND ON
 A PILLAR OF HARD WORK.
 OH, I JUST
 STARTED
 HERE
 TALENT & I HARD
 WORK
 TALENTHARD
 WORK
 owLTURD.com
violent-darts:

charlesoberonn:

jelloapocalypse:

These bother me sometimes.
We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ticket that makes them better at anything. If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”.


I will qualify this a small but I think important amount, because what it is is actually complicated: 
Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better hand-eye coordination. Some people’s brains and nervous systems are wired for better pattern recognition. Or translations of audio input. Or whatever. 
What this does is combine with @jelloapocalypse‘s EXTREMELY WELL-OBSERVED COMMENT (If someone says they “never practice” it’s probably because they like doing the skill and see it as a fun use of their time instead of “practice”.) in a way that can be both invisible and give this kind of person a massive leg up while being really discouraging to someone who doesn’t have that wiring. 
It doesn’t get to the actual original comic’s level of “oh I just started here”. But let’s take two people called Riley and Kennedy, and we’ll do singing, since that’s what I teach. 
Riley and Kennedy have exactly the same kind of background: parents who listen to the radio sometimes, the usual social stuff around popular music of whatever genre, etc, but no formal training. Neither of them sings in a church choir, neither of them falls into a formal disability category, whatever. 
The first time Riley shows up in my studio and we sing a really simple song I use as a diagnostic, she gets it mostly right. She can follow the tune; she can hear pitch, and it takes very little work for her to chivvy her voice into matching that pitch as long as there’s not something pulling her off. (In other words: as long as I’m singing the same notes as her and playing them on the piano, and as long a she can hear both herself and those notes). 
For Riley the lesson is really fun and validating and she goes home and sings along to her own music for a while and comes back next week with six songs she wants to try learning. And most of her lessons are like that: pretty easy positive feedback. That means Riley “practices” a lot in exactly the way @jelloapocalypse describes, even if she doesn’t think she’s actually practicing (that is, sitting down to sing the songs we’re working on together in a systematic way) at all. 
In contrast, the first time Kennedy comes to my studio, she struggles. It’s harder for her to hear the difference between notes, and it’s much harder for her to make her voice actually match the pitch she wants to sing at. When we pull out the diagnostic tune, she mostly manages to drone a few clusters of semi-tones, and while she can hear that she’s Off, it’s actually very hard for her to tell HOW she’s off, or what she should do to correct it. 
In most cases, for Kennedy, lessons - and in fact the overall experience of singing - is not fun. It’s not validating. It’s a whole process of Not Being Good, of Doing Things Wrong, and given the way humans are often in casual situations being laughed at. When Kennedy goes home she doesn’t sing along with any music she plays: she keeps her lips pressed together and at best enjoys other people singing (and maybe feels envious and demeaned because she can’t do it). 
Now the thing is, the practical “skill” difference for Riley and Kennedy here at the beginning is minimal. But the Rileys will tend (if they like what they’re doing) to ROCKET UP THE SKILL LEVEL, because of the “practice is fun so it’s just the thing I do” - because there is always a bunch of validation and positive reinforcement in the act of doing whatever it is, be it doodling or singing or math. 
The Kennedys won’t. In fact if they’re not lucky enough to have a good teacher, and one who can put a lot of this into perspective for them, they will tend to be inhibited. The worst time is when a Riley and a Kennedy are friends and sign up to learn together, and Riley takes off and Kennedy’s left sitting there feeling like she’s somehow Deeply Flawed. 
 And in fact the whole Doctrine of “It’s Just About How Hard You Work” will in and of itself become part of what inhibits them, because they will watch the Rileys - and even the Annas, Anna in this metaphor being the Totally Normal Student who never really exists - grasp things faster than they do, even if they ARE working hard. And this will HAPPEN. They will watch this reality happen in front of them … and then people say to them “oh, it’s all about how hard you work, dear.” And it’s like being gaslit. (Well, to be fair: it IS being gaslit, just without malice intended on the part of the people doing it.) 
And that message is horribly horribly toxic: here Kennedy is, and she IS working hard, but she’s still not progressing as fast as Riley or Anna no matter what she does! But it’s All About Hard Work, right? So that must mean that no matter how hard she THINKS she’s working, she’s actually just lazy, or doesn’t want it enough. It’s clearly a moral flaw in her. 
I actually have, personally, really good luck with teaching the Kennedys because I literally have this conversation with them when they come to my studio. I actually outright tell them: firstly, anyone who has working vocal chords can sing. Anyone who has working vocal chords and the ability to distinguish audio pitch can even sing on key in tune! But some people have an easy time learning this and some people have a hard time, and sometimes which it is has some relationship to, say, “early exposure to music” or whatever but sometimes it seems to be utterly fucking random - pure luck of the draw. 
You CAN SING. The capability is there. And if you want to we will find out how to make it happen. It might not happen as fast as for some other person, it might take more work, it might take more care, but that’s okay: that’s not your fault, that doesn’t mean you’re NOT working hard, but it does mean that here at the beginning we do things like recalibrate victories, we make your progress about YOU, not about Riley or Anna. 
But I’m also not going to gaslight you or make you feel like you’re either delusional or somehow especially So Terrible You Don’t Fit In The Rest Of The World: sure, I’ve got some Riley-types who walk in here, noodle around, and we go on to Art Songs. They exist. 
So what? Tall people exist. People with broad shoulders exist. People with dark hair exist. Physical embodiment and neurology hand out luck of the genetic roulette with no interest in outcomes. If you’re born blonde, it’s always going to take more work for you to have brown hair than someone born with brown hair, but much like dyeing your hair to match what you want, we can train the muscles of your voice and the neural pathways for hearing to do what you want. 
The differences between Rileys and Kennedys are very small. If Riley didn’t discover she liked singing and Kennedy worked at it for years then no, Riley would not “start out” as good as Kennedy is after those years. And you can be Riley and if you DON’T do the fucking work, the Annas of the world especially will blast past you and leave you in the dust. 
But on the other hand the Rileys get this wonderful cycle of positive reinforcement that does often start from a place of their coincidental physical embodiment giving them a slight leg up. And pretending that’s not the case does a big disservice to the Kennedys. 
We just absolutely do need to reframe that for what it is (a tiny fundamental difference and then a HELL OF A LOT OF “this is fun so I practice more so I get more validation so I -” and more or less no moral meaning at all), what it doesn’t mean, and how to compensate for it. 

violent-darts: charlesoberonn: jelloapocalypse: These bother me sometimes. We all start as literal useless babies. No one gets a magic ti...