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Abc, Children, and Complex: MorningAfter Former Walking Dead Star's New Role ls Real-Life Superhero Jacob Clifton Flled to: THE WALKING DEAD NEWS .com 'Walking Dead' Actress Goes Undercover And Saves 55 Sex Slaves In Real Life PERD MUSIC POLITICS TV MOVIES CULTURE SPORTS REVIEWS LISTS RS COUNTRY COVERWALL 'Walking Dead' Actress Helps Rescue Colombian Sex Slaves Laurie Holden, who played "Andrea" on the zombie drama, part of real life sting mission that brought down notorious sex trafficker BY DANIEL KREPS aMc WALK WALK! aMc intersectionalism: “Here’s a pretty unbelievable story: Laurie Holden is an actress who plays Andrea on “The Walking Dead,” but she isn’t just an actress. Holden also works as a human rights activist with a group called Operation Underground Railroad. It’s an organization run by an ex-CIA agent named Tim Ballard that works to take down unsavory human traffickers and the like. So, Holden and the group went down to Colombia to try to take down a group of men who were trafficking in underage prostitutes. Ballard, Holden and co. ingratiated themselves into this group and set up an elaborate party in an effort to catch these men in the act….” Adam Pliskin, Elite Daily  “For months, the group put together a massive sting operation in cooperation with Colombian authorities. They each had an elaborate cover story. Ballard’s story was that he was the best man in a wedding back in the U.S. and was looking to hire several underage prostitutes for a big bachelor party in Cartagena. The cover was meant to lure the sex traffickers into a setup so that Ballard and his team could rescue the girls, many of whom were under 18. … In order for Colombian officials to prosecute the sex traffickers, they have to catch them exchanging money for the girls on tape. … Holden’s job was to “keep [the traffickers] occupied by the pool area while Ballard and the undercover officers worked to catch the traffickers on tape exchanging money.” Candace Smith and Aristides Pinedo-Burns, ABC News  “When the traffickers agree on camera to to pimp out the underage girls and the money is exchanged, the cops move in to make the arrests.  During the ordeal Holden works with social workers to comfort the girls, who fear they’re the ones who will be in trouble and that they won’t be paid. Holden is clearly heartbroken when interviewed after the fact. But she should also be extremely proud of her work.” Ian Cervantes, Complex Read more plus video
Abc, Children, and Complex: MorningAfter
 Former Walking Dead Star's New Role ls
 Real-Life Superhero
 Jacob Clifton
 Flled to: THE WALKING DEAD
 NEWS
 .com

 'Walking Dead' Actress Goes Undercover
 And Saves 55 Sex Slaves In Real Life
 PERD

 MUSIC POLITICS TV MOVIES CULTURE SPORTS REVIEWS LISTS RS COUNTRY COVERWALL
 'Walking Dead' Actress Helps Rescue Colombian Sex
 Slaves
 Laurie Holden, who played "Andrea" on the zombie drama, part of real life sting mission that brought down notorious sex trafficker
 BY DANIEL KREPS
 aMc
 WALK
 WALK!
 aMc
intersectionalism:

“Here’s a pretty
unbelievable story: Laurie Holden is an actress who plays Andrea on “The
Walking Dead,” but she isn’t just an actress. Holden also works as a human
rights activist with a group called Operation Underground Railroad. It’s an
organization run by an ex-CIA agent named Tim Ballard that works to take down
unsavory human traffickers and the like. So, Holden and the group went down to
Colombia to try to take down a group of men who were trafficking in underage
prostitutes. Ballard, Holden and co. ingratiated themselves into this group and
set up an elaborate party in an effort to catch these men in the act….” Adam
Pliskin, Elite Daily 
“For months, the
group put together a massive sting operation in cooperation with Colombian
authorities. They each had an elaborate cover story. Ballard’s story was that
he was the best man in a wedding back in the U.S. and was looking to hire
several underage prostitutes for a big bachelor party in Cartagena. The cover
was meant to lure the sex traffickers into a setup so that Ballard and his team
could rescue the girls, many of whom were under 18. … In order for Colombian
officials to prosecute the sex traffickers, they have to catch them exchanging
money for the girls on tape. … Holden’s job was to “keep [the traffickers]
occupied by the pool area while Ballard and the undercover officers worked to
catch the traffickers on tape exchanging money.” Candace Smith and Aristides
Pinedo-Burns, ABC News 
“When the
traffickers agree on camera to to pimp out the underage girls and the money is
exchanged, the cops move in to make the arrests.  During the ordeal Holden works with social
workers to comfort the girls, who fear they’re the ones who will be in trouble
and that they won’t be paid. Holden is clearly heartbroken when interviewed
after the fact. But she should also be extremely proud of her work.” Ian
Cervantes, Complex
Read more plus video

intersectionalism: “Here’s a pretty unbelievable story: Laurie Holden is an actress who plays Andrea on “The Walking Dead,” but she isn’t j...

Google, Jennifer Lawrence, and Life: onexfeatherxleft: marieluc76: gjmueller: upworthy: If your nude photos are posted online without your permission, Microsoft and Google want to know. For years, most victims of revenge porn — people who have had their nude photos shared online without permission — basically couldn’t do anything about it. According to one study, over 50% of all adults engage in sexting, and 70% admit to having received a nude photo online or over the phone. And yet, despite the fact that we all (or at least more than half of us) do it, there’s still this weird, persistent, harmful notion that if your naked pictures get leaked or shared maliciously by an ex online, it’s your fault for taking them in the first place. It’s completely backward, but sadly, the law seems to at least kind of agree. As of September 2014, New Republic found, putting someone else’s illicit photos online without their consent was illegal in just 16 states, though laws have been proposed in more states. Not only is it typically impossible to prosecute the perpetrator, they note, it’s impossible to legally compel websites to take the images taken down most of the time. But thankfully, Microsoft and Google — which operate two of the biggest search engines on the web — don’t think it’s your fault. And they’re finally saying “Enough is enough.” Here’s how to report a non-consensual image posting on Bing. And here’s how to do it on Google. Boost! Here’s another way to fight back from your friendly neighborhood law student! If you took these pictures yourself, you owe the copyrights to these pictures so in addition to taking down the pictures you can smack them with a lawsuit not only for intentional infliction of emotional distress BUT ALSO copyright infringement so he has to pay you anywhere from $750-$10,000 per photo posted, x5 damages if there’s willfulness/malice (which there always is). Bleed those creeps dry.
Google, Jennifer Lawrence, and Life: onexfeatherxleft:

marieluc76:

gjmueller:

upworthy:

If your nude photos are posted online without your permission, Microsoft and Google want to know.
For years, most victims of revenge porn — people who have had their nude photos shared online without permission — basically couldn’t do anything about it.
According to one study, over 50% of all adults engage in sexting, and 70% admit to having received a nude photo online or over the phone.
And yet, despite the fact that we all (or at least more than half of us) do it, there’s still this weird, persistent, harmful notion that if your naked pictures get leaked or shared maliciously by an ex online, it’s your fault for taking them in the first place.
It’s completely backward, but sadly, the law seems to at least kind of agree.
As of September 2014, New Republic found, putting someone else’s illicit photos online without their consent was illegal in just 16 states, though laws have been proposed in more states. Not only is it typically impossible to prosecute the perpetrator, they note, it’s impossible to legally compel websites to take the images taken down most of the time.
But thankfully, Microsoft and Google — which operate two of the biggest search engines on the web — don’t think it’s your fault. And they’re finally saying “Enough is enough.”


	Here’s how to 
	report a non-consensual image posting on Bing.



	And here’s how to 
	do it on Google.


Boost!

Here’s another way to fight back from your friendly neighborhood law student! If you took these pictures yourself, you owe the copyrights to these pictures so in addition to taking down the pictures you can smack them with a lawsuit not only for intentional infliction of emotional distress BUT ALSO copyright infringement so he has to pay you anywhere from $750-$10,000 per photo posted, x5 damages if there’s willfulness/malice (which there always is). Bleed those creeps dry.

onexfeatherxleft: marieluc76: gjmueller: upworthy: If your nude photos are posted online without your permission, Microsoft and Google w...

Google, Jennifer Lawrence, and Life: hipsterkunt: valykas: onexfeatherxleft: marieluc76: gjmueller: upworthy: If your nude photos are posted online without your permission, Microsoft and Google want to know. For years, most victims of revenge porn — people who have had their nude photos shared online without permission — basically couldn’t do anything about it. According to one study, over 50% of all adults engage in sexting, and 70% admit to having received a nude photo online or over the phone. And yet, despite the fact that we all (or at least more than half of us) do it, there’s still this weird, persistent, harmful notion that if your naked pictures get leaked or shared maliciously by an ex online, it’s your fault for taking them in the first place. It’s completely backward, but sadly, the law seems to at least kind of agree. As of September 2014, New Republic found, putting someone else’s illicit photos online without their consent was illegal in just 16 states, though laws have been proposed in more states. Not only is it typically impossible to prosecute the perpetrator, they note, it’s impossible to legally compel websites to take the images taken down most of the time. But thankfully, Microsoft and Google — which operate two of the biggest search engines on the web — don’t think it’s your fault. And they’re finally saying “Enough is enough.” Here’s how to report a non-consensual image posting on Bing. And here’s how to do it on Google. Boost! Here’s another way to fight back from your friendly neighborhood law student! If you took these pictures yourself, you owe the copyrights to these pictures so in addition to taking down the pictures you can smack them with a lawsuit not only for intentional infliction of emotional distress BUT ALSO copyright infringement so he has to pay you anywhere from $750-$10,000 per photo posted, x5 damages if there’s willfulness/malice (which there always is). Bleed those creeps dry. I wish I knew this when someone posted mine online HOLY SHIT THIS IS SO IMPORTANT
Google, Jennifer Lawrence, and Life: hipsterkunt:
valykas:

onexfeatherxleft:

marieluc76:

gjmueller:

upworthy:

If your nude photos are posted online without your permission, Microsoft and Google want to know.
For years, most victims of revenge porn — people who have had their nude photos shared online without permission — basically couldn’t do anything about it.
According to one study, over 50% of all adults engage in sexting, and 70% admit to having received a nude photo online or over the phone.
And yet, despite the fact that we all (or at least more than half of us) do it, there’s still this weird, persistent, harmful notion that if your naked pictures get leaked or shared maliciously by an ex online, it’s your fault for taking them in the first place.
It’s completely backward, but sadly, the law seems to at least kind of agree.
As of September 2014, New Republic found, putting someone else’s illicit photos online without their consent was illegal in just 16 states, though laws have been proposed in more states. Not only is it typically impossible to prosecute the perpetrator, they note, it’s impossible to legally compel websites to take the images taken down most of the time.
But thankfully, Microsoft and Google — which operate two of the biggest search engines on the web — don’t think it’s your fault. And they’re finally saying “Enough is enough.”


	Here’s how to 
	report a non-consensual image posting on Bing.



	And here’s how to 
	do it on Google.


Boost!

Here’s another way to fight back from your friendly neighborhood law student! If you took these pictures yourself, you owe the copyrights to these pictures so in addition to taking down the pictures you can smack them with a lawsuit not only for intentional infliction of emotional distress BUT ALSO copyright infringement so he has to pay you anywhere from $750-$10,000 per photo posted, x5 damages if there’s willfulness/malice (which there always is). Bleed those creeps dry.


I wish I knew this when someone posted mine online


HOLY SHIT THIS IS SO IMPORTANT

hipsterkunt: valykas: onexfeatherxleft: marieluc76: gjmueller: upworthy: If your nude photos are posted online without your permission,...