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Dank, Memes, and Target: When you polish off a crowler and try to play fortnite on Thursday afternoon because thats all you have by shamrock81 MORE MEMES
Dank, Memes, and Target: When you polish off a crowler and try to play fortnite on Thursday afternoon because thats all you have by shamrock81
MORE MEMES

When you polish off a crowler and try to play fortnite on Thursday afternoon because thats all you have by shamrock81 MORE MEMES

America, Bad, and Barber: MY PAIN MAY BE THE REASON FOR SOMEBODY'S LAUGH BUT MY LAUGH MUST NEVER BE THE REASON FOR SOMEBODY'S PAIN. CHARLIE CHAPLIN stele3: anexperimentallife: sinbadism: kevinbolk: berrythehatchet: impudentstrumpet: kevinbolk: A philosophy I very much live my life by. Yeah, too bad he was a Nazi. was he? shit I’m assuming by “he was a Nazi” you meant he played a PARODY of Hitler in a MOVIE and in that same movie he also plays a barber who disguises himself as said Hitler parody and delivers one of the greatest anti-fascist speeches of all time. It’s okay. It’s an easy mistake to make. Literally where does someone come up with the idea that a Polish immigrant with heavy leftist leanings is in any way a Nazi In fact, Chaplin was harshly criticized by the American far right for being very anti-Nazi in the period leading up to America’s entry into World War 2, and many lambasted his film, “The Great Dictator,”–in which he parodied and ridiculed Hitler–as “anti-German” and “war-mongering.” The Nazis themselves, as well as the Nazi sympathizers and supporters of the American far right, hated him. Chaplin’s films were banned in Nazi Germany, and Nazi propaganda smeared him constantly. (Part of the smear was claiming he was Jewish–which he was not, but calling someone Jewish in Nazi Germany was guaranteed to inflame public sentiment against them.) Chaplin was concerned with social issues like homelessness, and was a liberal and an anti-Nazi at a time when to be either one (let along both) was to be accused of being a Communist–which at the time was pretty one of the worst things you could call someone–and indeed “anti-American.” (Because, again, American conservatives loved them some Nazis–right up until the time Hitler’s forces started invading other countries–and even then, the bulk of the US thought we shouldn’t “interfere” in what they saw as a strictly European affair.) Even after the war, and even after the world realized the despicable things the Nazis had done, Chaplin couldn’t shake the “Communist” and “anti-American” accusations from conservative American “journalists,” politicians, and others on the far right, who were still angry with him for his pre-war anti-Nazi sentiments. And when he refused to participate in the McCarthy’s “Red Scare” Communist witch-hunts of the early 1950s, he was banned from re-entering the United States, while on a trip to England. In short, Chaplin’s ANTI-NAZI leanings made him so many enemies in the US that they set off a chain of events that eventually saw him kicked out of the country. Oh, sure, the US finally issued a formal apology and invited him back, but by that time, his response was pretty much, “Yeah, too little, too late.” And justifiably so. Chaplin stood against everything the Nazis stood for, and was smeared and punished for it. So don’t you fucking dare call Charlie Chaplin a Nazi.  Dishonor on you. Dishonor on your family. Dishonor on your cow. The Nazis hated Charlie Chaplin so much they listed him in their Big Book of Jewish Enemies, despite him being gentile. No, really: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1579971/Nazi-propaganda-book-targeted-Charlie-Chaplin.html
America, Bad, and Barber: MY PAIN MAY BE THE REASON
 FOR SOMEBODY'S LAUGH
 BUT MY LAUGH MUST NEVER
 BE THE REASON FOR
 SOMEBODY'S PAIN.
 CHARLIE CHAPLIN
stele3:
anexperimentallife:

sinbadism:

kevinbolk:

berrythehatchet:

impudentstrumpet:

kevinbolk:

A philosophy I very much live my life by.

Yeah, too bad he was a Nazi.

was he? shit

I’m assuming by “he was a Nazi” you meant he played a PARODY of Hitler in a MOVIE and in that same movie he also plays a barber who disguises himself as said Hitler parody and delivers one of the greatest anti-fascist speeches of all time.
It’s okay. It’s an easy mistake to make.

Literally where does someone come up with the idea that a Polish immigrant with heavy leftist leanings is in any way a Nazi

In fact, Chaplin was harshly criticized by the American far right for being very anti-Nazi in the period leading up to America’s entry into World War 2, and many lambasted his film, “The Great Dictator,”–in which he parodied and ridiculed Hitler–as “anti-German” and “war-mongering.” The Nazis themselves, as well as the Nazi sympathizers and supporters of the American far right, hated him.
Chaplin’s films were banned in Nazi Germany, and Nazi propaganda smeared him constantly. (Part of the smear was claiming he was Jewish–which he was not, but calling someone Jewish in Nazi Germany was guaranteed to inflame public sentiment against them.) 
Chaplin was concerned with social issues like homelessness, and was a liberal and an anti-Nazi at a time when to be either one (let along both) was to be accused of being a Communist–which at the time was pretty one of the worst things you could call someone–and indeed “anti-American.” (Because, again, American conservatives loved them some Nazis–right up until the time Hitler’s forces started invading other countries–and even then, the bulk of the US thought we shouldn’t “interfere” in what they saw as a strictly European affair.)
Even after the war, and even after the world realized the despicable things the Nazis had done, Chaplin couldn’t shake the “Communist” and “anti-American” accusations from conservative American “journalists,” politicians, and others on the far right, who were still angry with him for his pre-war anti-Nazi sentiments. 
And when he refused to participate in the McCarthy’s “Red Scare” Communist witch-hunts of the early 1950s, he was banned from re-entering the United States, while on a trip to England.
In short, Chaplin’s ANTI-NAZI leanings made him so many enemies in the US that they set off a chain of events that eventually saw him kicked out of the country. Oh, sure, the US finally issued a formal apology and invited him back, but by that time, his response was pretty much, “Yeah, too little, too late.” And justifiably so.
Chaplin stood against everything the Nazis stood for, and was smeared and punished for it.
So don’t you fucking dare call Charlie Chaplin a Nazi. 
Dishonor on you. Dishonor on your family. Dishonor on your cow.

The Nazis hated Charlie Chaplin so much they listed him in their Big Book of Jewish Enemies, despite him being gentile. No, really: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1579971/Nazi-propaganda-book-targeted-Charlie-Chaplin.html

stele3: anexperimentallife: sinbadism: kevinbolk: berrythehatchet: impudentstrumpet: kevinbolk: A philosophy I very much live my life ...

America, Bad, and Barber: MY PAIN MAY BE THE REASON FOR SOMEBODY'S LAUGH BUT MY LAUGH MUST NEVER BE THE REASON FOR SOMEBODY'S PAIN. CHARLIE CHAPLIN idrils: stele3: anexperimentallife: sinbadism: kevinbolk: berrythehatchet: impudentstrumpet: kevinbolk: A philosophy I very much live my life by. Yeah, too bad he was a Nazi. was he? shit I’m assuming by “he was a Nazi” you meant he played a PARODY of Hitler in a MOVIE and in that same movie he also plays a barber who disguises himself as said Hitler parody and delivers one of the greatest anti-fascist speeches of all time. It’s okay. It’s an easy mistake to make. Literally where does someone come up with the idea that a Polish immigrant with heavy leftist leanings is in any way a Nazi In fact, Chaplin was harshly criticized by the American far right for being very anti-Nazi in the period leading up to America’s entry into World War 2, and many lambasted his film, “The Great Dictator,”–in which he parodied and ridiculed Hitler–as “anti-German” and “war-mongering.” The Nazis themselves, as well as the Nazi sympathizers and supporters of the American far right, hated him. Chaplin’s films were banned in Nazi Germany, and Nazi propaganda smeared him constantly. (Part of the smear was claiming he was Jewish–which he was not, but calling someone Jewish in Nazi Germany was guaranteed to inflame public sentiment against them.) Chaplin was concerned with social issues like homelessness, and was a liberal and an anti-Nazi at a time when to be either one (let along both) was to be accused of being a Communist–which at the time was pretty one of the worst things you could call someone–and indeed “anti-American.” (Because, again, American conservatives loved them some Nazis–right up until the time Hitler’s forces started invading other countries–and even then, the bulk of the US thought we shouldn’t “interfere” in what they saw as a strictly European affair.) Even after the war, and even after the world realized the despicable things the Nazis had done, Chaplin couldn’t shake the “Communist” and “anti-American” accusations from conservative American “journalists,” politicians, and others on the far right, who were still angry with him for his pre-war anti-Nazi sentiments. And when he refused to participate in the McCarthy’s “Red Scare” Communist witch-hunts of the early 1950s, he was banned from re-entering the United States, while on a trip to England. In short, Chaplin’s ANTI-NAZI leanings made him so many enemies in the US that they set off a chain of events that eventually saw him kicked out of the country. Oh, sure, the US finally issued a formal apology and invited him back, but by that time, his response was pretty much, “Yeah, too little, too late.” And justifiably so. Chaplin stood against everything the Nazis stood for, and was smeared and punished for it. So don’t you fucking dare call Charlie Chaplin a Nazi.  Dishonor on you. Dishonor on your family. Dishonor on your cow. The Nazis hated Charlie Chaplin so much they listed him in their Big Book of Jewish Enemies, despite him being gentile. No, really: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1579971/Nazi-propaganda-book-targeted-Charlie-Chaplin.html #getting listed in the big book of jewish enemies even as a gentile is some kind of goals
America, Bad, and Barber: MY PAIN MAY BE THE REASON
 FOR SOMEBODY'S LAUGH
 BUT MY LAUGH MUST NEVER
 BE THE REASON FOR
 SOMEBODY'S PAIN.
 CHARLIE CHAPLIN
idrils:

stele3:

anexperimentallife:

sinbadism:

kevinbolk:

berrythehatchet:

impudentstrumpet:

kevinbolk:

A philosophy I very much live my life by.

Yeah, too bad he was a Nazi.

was he? shit

I’m assuming by “he was a Nazi” you meant he played a PARODY of Hitler in a MOVIE and in that same movie he also plays a barber who disguises himself as said Hitler parody and delivers one of the greatest anti-fascist speeches of all time.
It’s okay. It’s an easy mistake to make.

Literally where does someone come up with the idea that a Polish immigrant with heavy leftist leanings is in any way a Nazi

In fact, Chaplin was harshly criticized by the American far right for being very anti-Nazi in the period leading up to America’s entry into World War 2, and many lambasted his film, “The Great Dictator,”–in which he parodied and ridiculed Hitler–as “anti-German” and “war-mongering.” The Nazis themselves, as well as the Nazi sympathizers and supporters of the American far right, hated him.
Chaplin’s films were banned in Nazi Germany, and Nazi propaganda smeared him constantly. (Part of the smear was claiming he was Jewish–which he was not, but calling someone Jewish in Nazi Germany was guaranteed to inflame public sentiment against them.) 
Chaplin was concerned with social issues like homelessness, and was a liberal and an anti-Nazi at a time when to be either one (let along both) was to be accused of being a Communist–which at the time was pretty one of the worst things you could call someone–and indeed “anti-American.” (Because, again, American conservatives loved them some Nazis–right up until the time Hitler’s forces started invading other countries–and even then, the bulk of the US thought we shouldn’t “interfere” in what they saw as a strictly European affair.)
Even after the war, and even after the world realized the despicable things the Nazis had done, Chaplin couldn’t shake the “Communist” and “anti-American” accusations from conservative American “journalists,” politicians, and others on the far right, who were still angry with him for his pre-war anti-Nazi sentiments. 
And when he refused to participate in the McCarthy’s “Red Scare” Communist witch-hunts of the early 1950s, he was banned from re-entering the United States, while on a trip to England.
In short, Chaplin’s ANTI-NAZI leanings made him so many enemies in the US that they set off a chain of events that eventually saw him kicked out of the country. Oh, sure, the US finally issued a formal apology and invited him back, but by that time, his response was pretty much, “Yeah, too little, too late.” And justifiably so.
Chaplin stood against everything the Nazis stood for, and was smeared and punished for it.
So don’t you fucking dare call Charlie Chaplin a Nazi. 
Dishonor on you. Dishonor on your family. Dishonor on your cow.

The Nazis hated Charlie Chaplin so much they listed him in their Big Book of Jewish Enemies, despite him being gentile. No, really: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1579971/Nazi-propaganda-book-targeted-Charlie-Chaplin.html

#getting listed in the big book of jewish enemies even as a gentile is some kind of goals

idrils: stele3: anexperimentallife: sinbadism: kevinbolk: berrythehatchet: impudentstrumpet: kevinbolk: A philosophy I very much liv...

America, Ass, and Friends: salparadisewasright: evilkitten3: glitterytiddies timsutton cbfplr: This is the world's largest crystal ruby. Mark Mothersbaugh had the gem carved in the shape of an ice cream cone. A few years ago I became friends with a gemologist, and I saw all these gems that he had lying around, one of which was this big ugly stone that I picked up. 'That's the world's largest ruby you're holding." He didn't know what to do with it, so next time I saw him l asked if I could carve it. It's right over there. [Points across the room to a glass case.] I was thinking: Who do you sell the world's largest ruby to? Somebody who's uber-rich. And people don't get uber-rich unless there's something dark attached to it. It's always communists in China, or drug dealers in South America, or oil people in Russia. It's those kinds of people who are going to want the world's largest ruby. And I wanted to fuck with them in some way. So l said: I'm going to carve it into a turd. But it will look like a custard them in I'm going set it on top of a cone, and it will look like a sweet-treat, but really it's a turod. They'll buy it because it's the world's largest ruby, but only I'll know that it's a turd." - Mark Mothersbaugh Chaotic good i have a new hero That got Mothersbaugh thinking. He asked if he could carve it. The gemologist asked what he'd turn it into. "I'd like to carve it into a turd, so whoever owns the world's largest ruby, they have to buy a turd to get it, he answered. It seemed like a good joke at the time, but a few weeks later, the two were talking again. "He goes, Hey, Mark, I was just at the King of Saudi Arabia's house and I told him what you wanted to do with the ruby and he laughed his ass off and he said, Let him do it." The completed sculpture is called Ruby Kusturd So it turns out you CAN polish a turd
America, Ass, and Friends: salparadisewasright:
 evilkitten3:
 glitterytiddies
 timsutton
 cbfplr:
 This is the world's largest crystal ruby. Mark Mothersbaugh had the gem carved in the
 shape of an ice cream cone.
 A few years ago I became friends with a gemologist, and I saw all these gems that he had
 lying around, one of which was this big ugly stone that I picked up. 'That's the world's
 largest ruby you're holding." He didn't know what to do with it, so next time I saw him l
 asked if I could carve it. It's right over there. [Points across the room to a glass case.]
 I was thinking: Who do you sell the world's largest ruby to? Somebody who's uber-rich. And
 people don't get uber-rich unless there's something dark attached to it. It's always
 communists in China, or drug dealers in South America, or oil people in Russia. It's those
 kinds of people who are going to want the world's largest ruby. And I wanted to fuck with
 them in some way. So l said: I'm going to carve it into a turd. But it will look like a custard
 them in
 I'm going set it on top of a cone, and it will look like a sweet-treat, but really it's a turod.
 They'll buy it because it's the world's largest ruby, but only I'll know that it's a turd." - Mark
 Mothersbaugh
 Chaotic good
 i have a new hero
 That got Mothersbaugh thinking. He asked if he could carve it. The gemologist asked what he'd turn it
 into. "I'd like to carve it into a turd, so whoever owns the world's largest ruby, they have to buy a turd
 to get it, he answered. It seemed like a good joke at the time, but a few weeks later, the two were
 talking again. "He goes, Hey, Mark, I was just at the King of Saudi Arabia's house and I told him what
 you wanted to do with the ruby and he laughed his ass off and he said, Let him do it."
 The completed sculpture is called Ruby Kusturd
So it turns out you CAN polish a turd

So it turns out you CAN polish a turd

Cats, Children, and Food: fat sajak. Follow @papayathebee I am unable to can T-Mobile LTE 9:14 PM Tweet Daniel F. Baranowski @DFBHarvard A stranger who doesn't speak English breaks into your home. They tell you they're here to stay They eat your food, go to your doctors, draw money from your bank, enroll in your schools. Then, they make demands of Congress. You complain to authorities. You're called a racist 1/27/18, 9:17 AM 775 Retweets 1,250 Likes StopHimNow @Saintsfan5348 2d Tweet your reply l T-Mobile LTE 9:15 PM Tweet Daniel F. Baranowski @DFBHarvard Replying to @velvet_chainsaw My polish ancestors (not the 1st Dreamers) came to this Great Country as LEGAL immigrants. They learned English, integrated, raised patriotic, educated children, fought in foreign wars & dying for our country, voted, & followed the rules! The insult of Democrats is despicable! Tweet your reply .Il T-Mobile LTE 9:15 PM Thread @CleverTitleTK So yeah. About that learning English thing This is the mythologizing/selective amnesia l'm talking about. This particular Polish great-grandfather of his is shown as not speaking English in both 1910 and 1920. He arrived in 1906 OCNSUS OF UNITED STATE Daniel F Baranowski My polish ancestors (not the came to this Great Country a immigrants. They learned English, integra patriotic, educated children, wars & dying for our country, followed the rules! The insult of Democrats is de Tweet your reply Stevonnie: An Experience @AdamantxYves Follow THE GOOD SIS PULLED HIS ACTUAL fat sajak. @papayathebee I am unable to can. Show this thread 6:30 PM -1 Feb 2018 9,692 Retweets 24,762 Likes kidkendoll: the-cats-pajamboree: gahdamnpunk: She said “Bet!” 😂😂 my favorite thing was this guy said all this and not once did the word “native americans” crossed his mind
Cats, Children, and Food: fat sajak.
 Follow
 @papayathebee
 I am unable to can

 T-Mobile LTE
 9:14 PM
 Tweet
 Daniel F. Baranowski
 @DFBHarvard
 A stranger who doesn't speak English
 breaks into your home. They tell you
 they're here to stay
 They eat your food, go to your doctors,
 draw money from your bank, enroll in
 your schools. Then, they make
 demands of Congress.
 You complain to authorities. You're
 called a racist
 1/27/18, 9:17 AM
 775 Retweets 1,250 Likes
 StopHimNow @Saintsfan5348 2d
 Tweet your reply

 l T-Mobile LTE
 9:15 PM
 Tweet
 Daniel F. Baranowski
 @DFBHarvard
 Replying to @velvet_chainsaw
 My polish ancestors (not the 1st
 Dreamers) came to this Great Country
 as LEGAL immigrants.
 They learned English, integrated, raised
 patriotic, educated children, fought in
 foreign wars & dying for our country,
 voted, & followed the rules!
 The insult of Democrats is despicable!
 Tweet your reply

 .Il T-Mobile LTE
 9:15 PM
 Thread
 @CleverTitleTK
 So yeah. About that learning English
 thing
 This is the mythologizing/selective
 amnesia l'm talking about.
 This particular Polish great-grandfather
 of his is shown as not speaking English
 in both 1910 and 1920. He arrived in
 1906
 OCNSUS OF
 UNITED STATE
 Daniel F Baranowski
 My polish ancestors (not the
 came to this Great Country a
 immigrants.
 They learned English, integra
 patriotic, educated children,
 wars & dying for our country,
 followed the rules!
 The insult of Democrats is de
 Tweet your reply

 Stevonnie: An Experience
 @AdamantxYves
 Follow
 THE GOOD SIS PULLED HIS ACTUAL
 fat sajak. @papayathebee
 I am unable to can.
 Show this thread
 6:30 PM -1 Feb 2018
 9,692 Retweets 24,762 Likes
kidkendoll:

the-cats-pajamboree:

gahdamnpunk:
She said “Bet!” 😂😂
my favorite thing was this guy said all this and not once did the word “native americans” crossed his mind

kidkendoll: the-cats-pajamboree: gahdamnpunk: She said “Bet!” 😂😂 my favorite thing was this guy said all this and not once did the word “n...

Bitch, God, and Hello: insomniac-arrest jolene33rpm me, trying to spell something in french: uhhhhhh i think that's enough vowels the french language: youe fooule.... youe insouelente coweurde nazerine I love japanese bc it's so regular and logical. eg, kore this, sore that, dore which koko here, soko there, doko where koitsu this person, soitsu that person, doitsu germany futureevilscientist confession: in the Russian alphabet, the letter x is pronounced like a hard h so whenever l see a phrase like "Sorry for your loss xoxo, instead of hugs and kisses my brain always briefly interprets it as "Sorry for your loss HOHOHO like some jolly Santa Schadenfreude laughter there Source: futureevilscientist assassinregrets im just the cherokee language has a verb tense that specifically notes the exclusion of a person in the so there's i'm going, you're going, we're going, and we're going (but not you) i love it conversation madmaudlingoes This is called "clusivity and it's found a bunch of languages, including Chechen, Vietnamese, Samoan, and Quechua. spinningyarns Some languages just side-eye harder than others. Source: assassinregrets lord-kitschener Polish: yo dawg we heard u like the letter z so we put some z's in ur z's so u can Grzegorz Brzęczyszczykiewicz relativelylessimportant Z is only worth one point in the Polish version of Scrabble. This sounds like a joke, but is actually true heatmor irish is such a shady language because hello is "dia duit but directly translated it means "god be with you" and when someone says hello back they say "dia is muire duit" which means "god and mary be with you . its like i see your god and i raise you the holy virgin whatcha gonna do bout it bitch Source: cradily Mark Magumpkin Д. Follow Spanish: The h is silent English: Many letters can be silent French: All letters are meaningless, every living thing is born without reason paddysnuffles tumblr: on languages Languages are fun
Bitch, God, and Hello: insomniac-arrest
 jolene33rpm
 me, trying to spell something in french: uhhhhhh i think that's enough vowels
 the french language: youe fooule.... youe insouelente coweurde
 nazerine
 I love japanese bc it's so regular and logical. eg,
 kore this, sore that, dore which
 koko here, soko there, doko where
 koitsu this person, soitsu that person, doitsu germany
 futureevilscientist
 confession: in the Russian alphabet, the letter x is pronounced like a hard h so
 whenever l see a phrase like "Sorry for your loss xoxo, instead of hugs and
 kisses my brain always briefly interprets it as "Sorry for your loss HOHOHO like
 some jolly Santa Schadenfreude laughter there
 Source: futureevilscientist
 assassinregrets
 im just
 the cherokee language has a verb tense that specifically notes the exclusion of a
 person in the
 so there's i'm going, you're going, we're going, and we're going (but not you)
 i love it
 conversation
 madmaudlingoes
 This is called "clusivity and it's found a bunch of languages, including Chechen,
 Vietnamese, Samoan, and Quechua.
 spinningyarns
 Some languages just side-eye harder than others.
 Source: assassinregrets
 lord-kitschener
 Polish: yo dawg we heard u like the letter z so we put some z's in ur z's so u can
 Grzegorz Brzęczyszczykiewicz
 relativelylessimportant
 Z is only worth one point in the Polish version of Scrabble. This sounds like a
 joke, but is actually true
 heatmor
 irish is such a shady language because hello is "dia duit but directly translated it
 means "god be with you" and when someone says hello back they say "dia is
 muire duit" which means "god and mary be with you . its like i see your god
 and i raise you the holy virgin whatcha gonna do bout it bitch
 Source: cradily
 Mark Magumpkin
 Д. Follow
 Spanish: The h is silent
 English: Many letters can be silent
 French: All letters are meaningless, every living
 thing is born without reason
 paddysnuffles
 tumblr: on languages
Languages are fun

Languages are fun

Cats, Children, and Food: fat sajak. Follow @papayathebee I am unable to can T-Mobile LTE 9:14 PM Tweet Daniel F. Baranowski @DFBHarvard A stranger who doesn't speak English breaks into your home. They tell you they're here to stay They eat your food, go to your doctors, draw money from your bank, enroll in your schools. Then, they make demands of Congress. You complain to authorities. You're called a racist 1/27/18, 9:17 AM 775 Retweets 1,250 Likes StopHimNow @Saintsfan5348 2d Tweet your reply l T-Mobile LTE 9:15 PM Tweet Daniel F. Baranowski @DFBHarvard Replying to @velvet_chainsaw My polish ancestors (not the 1st Dreamers) came to this Great Country as LEGAL immigrants. They learned English, integrated, raised patriotic, educated children, fought in foreign wars & dying for our country, voted, & followed the rules! The insult of Democrats is despicable! Tweet your reply .Il T-Mobile LTE 9:15 PM Thread @CleverTitleTK So yeah. About that learning English thing This is the mythologizing/selective amnesia l'm talking about. This particular Polish great-grandfather of his is shown as not speaking English in both 1910 and 1920. He arrived in 1906 OCNSUS OF UNITED STATE Daniel F Baranowski My polish ancestors (not the came to this Great Country a immigrants. They learned English, integra patriotic, educated children, wars & dying for our country, followed the rules! The insult of Democrats is de Tweet your reply Stevonnie: An Experience @AdamantxYves Follow THE GOOD SIS PULLED HIS ACTUAL fat sajak. @papayathebee I am unable to can. Show this thread 6:30 PM -1 Feb 2018 9,692 Retweets 24,762 Likes the-cats-pajamboree: gahdamnpunk: She said “Bet!” 😂😂 my favorite thing was this guy said all this and not once did the word “native americans” crossed his mind
Cats, Children, and Food: fat sajak.
 Follow
 @papayathebee
 I am unable to can

 T-Mobile LTE
 9:14 PM
 Tweet
 Daniel F. Baranowski
 @DFBHarvard
 A stranger who doesn't speak English
 breaks into your home. They tell you
 they're here to stay
 They eat your food, go to your doctors,
 draw money from your bank, enroll in
 your schools. Then, they make
 demands of Congress.
 You complain to authorities. You're
 called a racist
 1/27/18, 9:17 AM
 775 Retweets 1,250 Likes
 StopHimNow @Saintsfan5348 2d
 Tweet your reply

 l T-Mobile LTE
 9:15 PM
 Tweet
 Daniel F. Baranowski
 @DFBHarvard
 Replying to @velvet_chainsaw
 My polish ancestors (not the 1st
 Dreamers) came to this Great Country
 as LEGAL immigrants.
 They learned English, integrated, raised
 patriotic, educated children, fought in
 foreign wars & dying for our country,
 voted, & followed the rules!
 The insult of Democrats is despicable!
 Tweet your reply

 .Il T-Mobile LTE
 9:15 PM
 Thread
 @CleverTitleTK
 So yeah. About that learning English
 thing
 This is the mythologizing/selective
 amnesia l'm talking about.
 This particular Polish great-grandfather
 of his is shown as not speaking English
 in both 1910 and 1920. He arrived in
 1906
 OCNSUS OF
 UNITED STATE
 Daniel F Baranowski
 My polish ancestors (not the
 came to this Great Country a
 immigrants.
 They learned English, integra
 patriotic, educated children,
 wars & dying for our country,
 followed the rules!
 The insult of Democrats is de
 Tweet your reply

 Stevonnie: An Experience
 @AdamantxYves
 Follow
 THE GOOD SIS PULLED HIS ACTUAL
 fat sajak. @papayathebee
 I am unable to can.
 Show this thread
 6:30 PM -1 Feb 2018
 9,692 Retweets 24,762 Likes
the-cats-pajamboree:
gahdamnpunk:
She said “Bet!” 😂😂
my favorite thing was this guy said all this and not once did the word “native americans” crossed his mind

the-cats-pajamboree: gahdamnpunk: She said “Bet!” 😂😂 my favorite thing was this guy said all this and not once did the word “native american...

Bad, Books, and Crush: I think I've got a crush on one of my friends, but I'm not sure if that makes me bisexual or if it's just a phase. I'm 14. Is there any way to know? Anonymous You're 14. You're not only still learning about yourself, you're still forming This is a time for phases, and that's not a bad thing. Revel in phases like you' ve never been old enough to before and will never be young enough to do again Try phases. Wear ugly nail polish. Dip-dye your hair. Cut it all off. Cry about that. Wear hats and wigs or not. Pierce your belly button with a sewing needie and ice and have it get infected and ooze pus on your favorite shirt and learn why you'll get all your other piercings done at a shop. Weep yourself sick over things you'll think are stupid in six months, six days, or six hours...or things that will scar your heart until you're eighty. Know that you'll survive both. Eat an entire cheesecake because your metabolism is young. Try wine coolers and learn that they're disgusting and a sip of Shiraz you'll need a job to afford and learn that it can be disgusting too. Be a poet this week and don't shower and wander around barefoot at night thinking deep thoughts until you step in dog crap, then be a photojoumalist, then an activist, then a vegan, then a misanthropic nihilist Get your heart broken. Survive it Be fifteen versions of yourself in sixteen weeks and try on selves like blue jeans until you find one that fits for now and makes you feel amazing and know that it's ok if it doesn't fit ater because you're still growing and there are always more on the shelves and in weird little thrift stores and you can even sew your own. Kiss boys, kiss giris, kiss people who are neither or both, kiss puppies and babies and photos of celebrities and old books. Kiss being 14 - deeply, wetly, messily -before you have to kiss it good bye and worry about what labels stick andythanfiction Can we please just tell every middle schooler this instead of making them feel embarrassed by their existence and their need to try new things? It would be much nicer to hear this through middle school and high school than it is to hear about how dumb your phase or whatever is and how much you'll regret it in a year Damn, every time I see this go by my dash, it has, like, 10K more notes. I'm awed by how much it seems to have meant to so many people, and incredibly moved to see so many notes saying that this has mattered 103,825 notes Phases
Bad, Books, and Crush: I think I've got a crush on one of my friends,
 but I'm not sure if that makes me bisexual or
 if it's just a phase. I'm 14. Is there any way to
 know?
 Anonymous
 You're 14. You're not only still learning about yourself, you're still forming
 This is a time for phases, and that's not a bad thing. Revel in phases like
 you' ve never been old enough to before and will never be young enough to do
 again
 Try phases. Wear ugly nail polish. Dip-dye your hair. Cut it all off. Cry about
 that. Wear hats and wigs or not. Pierce your belly button with a sewing needie
 and ice and have it get infected and ooze pus on your favorite shirt and learn
 why you'll get all your other piercings done at a shop. Weep yourself sick over
 things you'll think are stupid in six months, six days, or six hours...or things that
 will scar your heart until you're eighty. Know that you'll survive both. Eat an
 entire cheesecake because your metabolism is young. Try wine coolers and
 learn that they're disgusting and a sip of Shiraz you'll need a job to afford and
 learn that it can be disgusting too. Be a poet this week and don't shower and
 wander around barefoot at night thinking deep thoughts until you step in dog
 crap, then be a photojoumalist, then an activist, then a vegan, then a
 misanthropic nihilist Get your heart broken. Survive it Be fifteen versions of
 yourself in sixteen weeks and try on selves like blue jeans until you find one
 that fits for now and makes you feel amazing and know that it's ok if it doesn't fit
 ater because you're still growing and there are always more on the shelves
 and in weird little thrift stores and you can even sew your own. Kiss boys, kiss
 giris, kiss people who are neither or both, kiss puppies and babies and photos
 of celebrities and old books. Kiss being 14 - deeply, wetly, messily -before you
 have to kiss it good bye and worry about what labels stick
 andythanfiction
 Can we please just tell every middle schooler this instead of making
 them feel embarrassed by their existence and their need to try new
 things? It would be much nicer to hear this through middle school and
 high school than it is to hear about how dumb your phase or whatever
 is and how much you'll regret it in a year
 Damn, every time I see this go by my dash, it has, like, 10K more notes. I'm
 awed by how much it seems to have meant to so many people, and
 incredibly moved to see so many notes saying that this has mattered
 103,825 notes
Phases

Phases

Alive, Being Alone, and Bad: Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 Okay, one last thread. And then I'm watching Gilmore Girls. Idk what they're teaching about Nazis in school these days but here goes.. 275 7.9K 9.6K Katie @YourRacingBelle Follow When Hitler marched into Poland in 1939, my grandma was two years old. It was not immediately obvious that anything was changing in her town 5:46 PM-15 Aug 2017 from Alafaya, FL 1,351 Retweets 2,970 Likes OOOOOO 67th 143.0K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 Replying to @YourRacingBelle When she was 4 years old, she was playing outside when she suddenly heard yelling and screaming. She looked across the yard to see Nazis. 4 t 306 1.7K Katie @YourRacingBele Aug 15 And to see the dead body of her three year old neighbor boy who had been playing loudly in his yard. The Nazis were annoyed by the noise. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 They shot him dead on the spot. 3 years old. Dead from a Nazi bullet. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 A couple of months later, my grandmother and her family were woken up very early in the morning. They were told to get up and go outside 2t 250 1.5K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 They were marched to the train station. Her father got on one train. Her mother her baby sisters, and her were put on another 91 ti 252 1.5K Katie @YourRacingBele Aug 15 On the first day my grandma, who was five now, was in Majdanek, she and the other children were told to line up outside before breakfast. 91 tl 253 1.5K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 The Nazi soldier counted each child. One...two...three...our... ive...six...seven...eight...nine...the tenth child was shot. 2 311 1.5K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 The soldier told the children that any bad child would be shot. So they must work and not complain or be loud. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 My grandma was a Polish Catholic, which was only a couple steps above a Polish Jew. One of the officer's wives decided she wanted a child 2 t 279 1.6K Katie @YourRacingBele Aug 15 So she "adopted" my grandma. Changed her name. Told her her mother was dead. And that she was a German now Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 The day the news broke that the Allies were coming to Poland, the German officer and his wife left in a hurry. In so much of a hurry... Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 That they forgot my grandma, their special new daughter. She was found in one of the officer's homes after 3 days alone t 267 1.6K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 The Red Cross took her in, and they asked her her name, which she barely remembered. They spent six months looking for her family 253 1.6K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 They were eventually found, somehow all alive. Aunts and uncles weren't, but mother, father, and baby sister were 4 th 246 1.9 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 My grandma did not remember the Nazi officer and his wife with fondness. She did not view them as humans or benefactors. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 And she did not tell me this story until the day she took me to the gates of Majdanek. Where she broke down screaming at the memories. 4 t1 309 2.2K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 That was in 2001. 56 years after she was rescued by the Red Cross. Those horrors did not fade with time. They were ingrained in her brain 4 2.5K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 Studies show the Holocaust changed the DNA of its victims. Changed their mental make up. I live with that DNA, with that change. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 And if you believe that Neo-Nazis are "good people" or they "deserve a voice", I remind you of a three year old boy shot dead Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 That is what giving the Nazis a voice in 1933 led to. It led to my grandma sobbing outside a place where she was imprisoned 10 500 2.6K Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 The Nazis did not start with these things. They started with a voice. And a message. And it ended in unspeakable horrors. Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15 And that? That is why Neo-Nazis don't deserve a voice. Because those they worship didn't just talk. 91 775 4.4K
Alive, Being Alone, and Bad: Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 Okay, one last thread. And then I'm watching Gilmore Girls. Idk what they're
 teaching about Nazis in school these days but here goes..
 275 7.9K 9.6K
 Katie
 @YourRacingBelle
 Follow
 When Hitler marched into Poland in 1939, my
 grandma was two years old. It was not
 immediately obvious that anything was
 changing in her town
 5:46 PM-15 Aug 2017 from Alafaya, FL
 1,351 Retweets 2,970 Likes OOOOOO
 67th 143.0K

 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 Replying to @YourRacingBelle
 When she was 4 years old, she was playing outside when she suddenly heard
 yelling and screaming. She looked across the yard to see Nazis.
 4
 t 306
 1.7K
 Katie @YourRacingBele Aug 15
 And to see the dead body of her three year old neighbor boy who had been
 playing loudly in his yard. The Nazis were annoyed by the noise.
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 They shot him dead on the spot. 3 years old. Dead from a Nazi bullet.
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 A couple of months later, my grandmother and her family were woken up very
 early in the morning. They were told to get up and go outside
 2t 250 1.5K
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 They were marched to the train station. Her father got on one train. Her mother
 her baby sisters, and her were put on another
 91 ti 252 1.5K

 Katie @YourRacingBele Aug 15
 On the first day my grandma, who was five now, was in Majdanek, she and the
 other children were told to line up outside before breakfast.
 91 tl 253 1.5K
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 The Nazi soldier counted each child.
 One...two...three...our... ive...six...seven...eight...nine...the tenth child was shot.
 2
 311
 1.5K
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 The soldier told the children that any bad child would be shot. So they must work
 and not complain or be loud.
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 My grandma was a Polish Catholic, which was only a couple steps above a Polish
 Jew. One of the officer's wives decided she wanted a child
 2 t 279 1.6K
 Katie @YourRacingBele Aug 15
 So she "adopted" my grandma. Changed her name. Told her her mother was
 dead. And that she was a German now

 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 The day the news broke that the Allies were coming to Poland, the German officer
 and his wife left in a hurry. In so much of a hurry...
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 That they forgot my grandma, their special new daughter. She was found in one
 of the officer's homes after 3 days alone
 t 267 1.6K
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 The Red Cross took her in, and they asked her her name, which she barely
 remembered. They spent six months looking for her family
 253
 1.6K
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 They were eventually found, somehow all alive. Aunts and uncles weren't, but
 mother, father, and baby sister were
 4
 th 246 1.9
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 My grandma did not remember the Nazi officer and his wife with fondness. She
 did not view them as humans or benefactors.
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 And she did not tell me this story until the day she took me to the gates of
 Majdanek. Where she broke down screaming at the memories.
 4
 t1 309
 2.2K
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 That was in 2001. 56 years after she was rescued by the Red Cross. Those horrors
 did not fade with time. They were ingrained in her brain
 4
 2.5K

 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 Studies show the Holocaust changed the DNA of its victims. Changed their mental
 make up. I live with that DNA, with that change.
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 And if you believe that Neo-Nazis are "good people" or they "deserve a voice", I
 remind you of a three year old boy shot dead
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 That is what giving the Nazis a voice in 1933 led to. It led to my grandma sobbing
 outside a place where she was imprisoned
 10
 500
 2.6K
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 The Nazis did not start with these things. They started with a voice. And a
 message. And it ended in unspeakable horrors.
 Katie @YourRacingBelle Aug 15
 And that? That is why Neo-Nazis don't deserve a voice. Because those they
 worship didn't just talk.
 91
 775
 4.4K
America, Apparently, and Bad: mothman @LEVKAWA how to tell when a bilingual character was not written by a bilingual person 101 "Hola ¿Qué pasa?" Lance said. "Uh...what?" "Ah, sorry. It's hard to switch back sometimes. What's up?" He corrected kalidels: misdiagnosed-ghost: rrojasandribbons: cobaltmoony: silentwalrus1: justgot1: cricketcat9: artykyn: prideling: gunvolt: im going to have a stroke Instead try…Person A: You know… the thingPerson B: The “thing”?Person A: Yeah, the thing with the little-! *mutters under their breath* Como es que se llama esa mierda… THE FISHING ROD As someone with multiple bilingual friends where English is not the first language, may I present to you a list of actual incidents I have witnessed: Forgot a word in Spanish, while speaking Spanish to me, but remembered it in English. Became weirdly quiet as they seemed to lose their entire sense of identity.Used a literal translation of a Russian idiomatic expression while speaking English. He actually does this quite regularly, because he somehow genuinely forgets which idioms belong to which language. It usually takes a minute of everyone staring at him in confused silence before he says “….Ah….. that must be a Russian one then….”Had to count backwards for something. Could not count backwards in English. Counted backwards in French under her breath until she got to the number she needed, and then translated it into English.Meant to inform her (French) parents that bread in America is baked with a lot of preservatives. Her brain was still halfway in English Mode so she used the word “préservatifes.” Ended up shocking her parents with the knowledge that apparently, bread in America is full of condoms.Defined a slang term for me……. with another slang term. In the same language. Which I do not speak.Was talking to both me and his mother in English when his mother had to revert to Russian to ask him a question about a word. He said “I don’t know” and turned to me and asked “Is there an English equivalent for Нумизматический?” and it took him a solid minute to realize there was no way I would be able to answer that. Meanwhile his mom quietly chuckled behind his back.Said an expression in English but with Spanish grammar, which turned “How stressful!” into “What stressing!” Bilingual characters are great but if you’re going to use a linguistic blunder, you have to really understand what they actually blunder over. And it’s usually 10x funnier than “Ooops it’s hard to switch back.” I use Spanish and English daily, none is my native language. When I’m tired or did not have enough sleep I loose track of who to address in which language;  I caught myself explaining something in Spanish to my English-speaking friends more than once. When I’m REALLY tired I’ll throw some Polish words in the mix.  There is nothing more painful than bad fake Spanglish by an American writer. Bilingual people don’t just randomly drop words in nonsensical places in their sentences ffs. “I’m muy tired! I think I’ll go to my cama and go to sleep!“ Nobody does that. From my bilingual parents: - Only being able to do math in their original language. “Ok so that would beeeeee … *muttering* ocho por cuatro menos tres…” - Losing words and getting mad at you about it. “Gimme the - the - UGH, ESA COSA AHI’ CARAJO. The thing, the oven mitt. Christ.” - Making asides to you in Spanish even though you’ve told them to not do this as lots of people here speak Spanish. “Oye, mira esa, que cara fea.” “MOM FFS WE’RE IN A MEXICAN NEIGHBORHOOD.” - Swears in English don’t count. - Swears in Spanish mean you’d better fucking run, kid. - Introducing you to English-only Americans using your Spanish name so that they mispronounce your name for all eternity because that’s what your mom said your name was. “Hi Dee-yanna!” “sigh, Just call me Diana.” “Yeah but your mom said your name was Dee-yanna.”  - Your parents give you a name that only makes sense in Spanish. “Your name is Floor?” “No, my name is Flor.” “FLOOR?” “Sigh.”  - conjugating English words with Russian grammar and vice versa. Sometimes both at once, which is extra fun.  самолет -  самолетас -  самолетасы - when vice versa, dropping English articles entirely. The, a, an: all gone. e.g. “I go to store and buy thing, I fix car and go to place.” This also happens when i am very tired  - speaking English with heavy accent you don’t actually have - when my family and I are switching over fast, we say the English words in a very heavy Russian accent that mostly doesn’t show up otherwise  bonus:  - keysmashing in the wrong language when your keyboard is still switched over - using ))))) instead of :))) or other culture-specific emoji/typing quirks all of the above OMG. THIS.  -switching from Romanes to English and forgetting that articles exist because Romanes doesn’t always use them-starting to say a word in one language and trying to smoothly transition it to another language: n…oooooo, thank you is probably my most common-using English profanity when speaking Romanes-using Romanes profanity when speaking English.. that’s how you know I am angry-the over extension of the word “not” in English that comes out something like this; “I have not cash on me”.-counting in my head in Romanes always, but math always in English, which might explain my bad math skills-drunk accents.. I have a heavy accent when drunk.. and only when drunk-substituting Romani words when trying to speak in Serbian even when the other speaker is bilingual in English-aspirating English phonemes that are not meant to be aspirated -accidentally pronouncing the English “i” sounds as “ee”.. I have a dog named Snickers and everyone thinks her name is Sneakers-describing objects in detail, but forgetting the actual name of it in your target language; dzhanes, ‘odaji glazhuni.. thaj zhamija si ‘oda.. ejjjjj.. dikhes perdal oda.. ejjjj.. ekh… feljastra! Ekh feljastra! -”the thing” in both languages.. -except e buki also means “the work”, and o kasavo mean “such”, or “like this”, so in English I mean to say “the thing”, but I really say “the this, you know, this, this, this, the thingy.” But, it sounds like, “da dis, you know, dis, dis, dis, da tingy.”-subject verb agreement doesn’t exist when switching languages; ^^see above.. that was not an intentional mistake-“is mine” to mean “I have”; “Dog is mine” = “I have a dog” I could keep going.. but, yea, bilingual quirks are waaaay better and funnier when you actually understand how they work and the grammar quirks of both target languages.  I always fucking forget the word “chess”???? And I sit there saying шахматы over and over to myself until I finally remember it in English. blunders also happen when they have to note down something real quick or take lectures! my notes when I was in Italy for my exchange year are incomprehensible to basically everyone lmao it’s a huge jumble of thai, english, and italian. because sometimes it’s easier to just write down a concept in english rather than have to translate it back to your native language! also while I was there I spent a day with an american friend and when we were saying goodbye to each other this literally happened: “well have a safe trip home!! I’ll see you….. um…. dopo… dopo.. dopo.. LATER! LATER!! I’LL SEE YOU LATER”
America, Apparently, and Bad: mothman
 @LEVKAWA
 how to tell when a bilingual character was
 not written by a bilingual person 101
 "Hola ¿Qué pasa?" Lance said.
 "Uh...what?"
 "Ah, sorry. It's hard to switch back sometimes. What's
 up?" He corrected
kalidels:

misdiagnosed-ghost:

rrojasandribbons:

cobaltmoony:

silentwalrus1:

justgot1:

cricketcat9:

artykyn:

prideling:

gunvolt:
im going to have a stroke
Instead try…Person A: You know… the thingPerson B: The “thing”?Person A: Yeah, the thing with the little-! *mutters under their breath* Como es que se llama esa mierda… THE FISHING ROD

As someone with multiple bilingual friends where English is not the first language, may I present to you a list of actual incidents I have witnessed:
Forgot a word in Spanish, while speaking Spanish to me, but remembered it in English. Became weirdly quiet as they seemed to lose their entire sense of identity.Used a literal translation of a Russian idiomatic expression while speaking English. He actually does this quite regularly, because he somehow genuinely forgets which idioms belong to which language. It usually takes a minute of everyone staring at him in confused silence before he says “….Ah….. that must be a Russian one then….”Had to count backwards for something. Could not count backwards in English. Counted backwards in French under her breath until she got to the number she needed, and then translated it into English.Meant to inform her (French) parents that bread in America is baked with a lot of preservatives. Her brain was still halfway in English Mode so she used the word “préservatifes.” Ended up shocking her parents with the knowledge that apparently, bread in America is full of condoms.Defined a slang term for me……. with another slang term. In the same language. Which I do not speak.Was talking to both me and his mother in English when his mother had to revert to Russian to ask him a question about a word. He said “I don’t know” and turned to me and asked “Is there an English equivalent for Нумизматический?” and it took him a solid minute to realize there was no way I would be able to answer that. Meanwhile his mom quietly chuckled behind his back.Said an expression in English but with Spanish grammar, which turned “How stressful!” into “What stressing!”
Bilingual characters are great but if you’re going to use a linguistic blunder, you have to really understand what they actually blunder over. And it’s usually 10x funnier than “Ooops it’s hard to switch back.”

I use Spanish and English daily, none is my native language. When I’m tired or did not have enough sleep I loose track of who to address in which language;  I caught myself explaining something in Spanish to my English-speaking friends more than once. When I’m REALLY tired I’ll throw some Polish words in the mix. 

There is nothing more painful than bad fake Spanglish by an American writer. Bilingual people don’t just randomly drop words in nonsensical places in their sentences ffs. “I’m muy tired! I think I’ll go to my cama and go to sleep!“ Nobody does that.
From my bilingual parents:
- Only being able to do math in their original language. “Ok so that would beeeeee … *muttering* ocho por cuatro menos tres…”
- Losing words and getting mad at you about it. “Gimme the - the - UGH, ESA COSA AHI’ CARAJO. The thing, the oven mitt. Christ.”
- Making asides to you in Spanish even though you’ve told them to not do this as lots of people here speak Spanish. “Oye, mira esa, que cara fea.” “MOM FFS WE’RE IN A MEXICAN NEIGHBORHOOD.”
- Swears in English don’t count.
- Swears in Spanish mean you’d better fucking run, kid.
- Introducing you to English-only Americans using your Spanish name so that they mispronounce your name for all eternity because that’s what your mom said your name was. “Hi Dee-yanna!” “sigh, Just call me Diana.” “Yeah but your mom said your name was Dee-yanna.” 
- Your parents give you a name that only makes sense in Spanish. “Your name is Floor?” “No, my name is Flor.” “FLOOR?” “Sigh.”

 - conjugating English words with Russian grammar and vice versa. Sometimes both at once, which is extra fun. 
самолет - 
самолетас - 

самолетасы
- when vice versa, dropping English articles entirely. The, a, an: all gone. e.g. “I go to store and buy thing, I fix car and go to place.” This also happens when i am very tired 
- speaking English with heavy accent you don’t actually have - when my family and I are switching over fast, we say the English words in a very heavy Russian accent that mostly doesn’t show up otherwise 
bonus: 
- keysmashing in the wrong language when your keyboard is still switched over
- using ))))) instead of :))) or other culture-specific emoji/typing quirks

all of the above

OMG. THIS. 
-switching from Romanes to English and forgetting that articles exist because Romanes doesn’t always use them-starting to say a word in one language and trying to smoothly transition it to another language: n…oooooo, thank you is probably my most common-using English profanity when speaking Romanes-using Romanes profanity when speaking English.. that’s how you know I am angry-the over extension of the word “not” in English that comes out something like this; “I have not cash on me”.-counting in my head in Romanes always, but math always in English, which might explain my bad math skills-drunk accents.. I have a heavy accent when drunk.. and only when drunk-substituting Romani words when trying to speak in Serbian even when the other speaker is bilingual in English-aspirating English phonemes that are not meant to be aspirated -accidentally pronouncing the English “i” sounds as “ee”.. I have a dog named Snickers and everyone thinks her name is Sneakers-describing objects in detail, but forgetting the actual name of it in your target language; dzhanes, ‘odaji glazhuni.. thaj zhamija si ‘oda.. ejjjjj.. dikhes perdal oda.. ejjjj.. ekh… feljastra! Ekh feljastra! -”the thing” in both languages.. -except e buki also means “the work”, and o kasavo mean “such”, or “like this”, so in English I mean to say “the thing”, but I really say “the this, you know, this, this, this, the thingy.” But, it sounds like, “da dis, you know, dis, dis, dis, da tingy.”-subject verb agreement doesn’t exist when switching languages; ^^see above.. that was not an intentional mistake-“is mine” to mean “I have”; “Dog is mine” = “I have a dog”
I could keep going.. but, yea, bilingual quirks are waaaay better and funnier when you actually understand how they work and the grammar quirks of both target languages. 

I always fucking forget the word “chess”???? And I sit there saying шахматы over and over to myself until I finally remember it in English.

blunders also happen when they have to note down something real quick or take lectures! my notes when I was in Italy for my exchange year are incomprehensible to basically everyone lmao it’s a huge jumble of thai, english, and italian. because sometimes it’s easier to just write down a concept in english rather than have to translate it back to your native language!
also while I was there I spent a day with an american friend and when we were saying goodbye to each other this literally happened: “well have a safe trip home!! I’ll see you….. um…. dopo… dopo.. dopo.. LATER! LATER!! I’LL SEE YOU LATER”

kalidels: misdiagnosed-ghost: rrojasandribbons: cobaltmoony: silentwalrus1: justgot1: cricketcat9: artykyn: prideling: gunvolt: im ...

Church, Desperate, and Family: apismel1fera: grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedlybespectacled: gdfalksen: Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died. Why can’t we have a movie about him? He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce. His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions. He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife. He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint. Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy. It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people. It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them. He told an interviewer: You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage. He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral. I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them! I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers. Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa.  The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”   I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art.  Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa. always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important. heroic
Church, Desperate, and Family: apismel1fera:
grrlpup:

antifainternational:

mousezilla:

rhube:

fahrlight:

westsemiteblues:

returnofthejudai:

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.
His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.
He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.
He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.
Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.
It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them.

He told an interviewer:
You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. 
People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.
He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.

I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them!

I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers.

Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa. 
The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”  
I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art. 

Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa.

always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important.

heroic

apismel1fera: grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedlybe...