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observer: Truer words have never been spoken! by Lazy_Observer MORE MEMES
observer: Truer words have never been spoken! by Lazy_Observer
MORE MEMES

Truer words have never been spoken! by Lazy_Observer MORE MEMES

observer: I’m gonna do what’s called a pro gamer move. by Lazy_Observer MORE MEMES
observer: I’m gonna do what’s called a pro gamer move. by Lazy_Observer
MORE MEMES

I’m gonna do what’s called a pro gamer move. by Lazy_Observer MORE MEMES

observer: I like how this website has shown me so many pictures that would mean absolutely nothing to the casual observer and yet unlock a primal fear for me, a veteran of this hell world.
observer: I like how this website has shown me so many pictures that would mean absolutely nothing to the casual observer and yet unlock a primal fear for me, a veteran of this hell world.

I like how this website has shown me so many pictures that would mean absolutely nothing to the casual observer and yet unlock a primal f...

observer: Teacher: You have to make an innocent computer game! Me: Hose/lose from zach gage loselose is a game about choice and consequence, and b what it means to sucoeed or fail You play the role of a space captain on a seemingly endless quest to dectroy aftacking aliens. You receive one point for each alien you kil You have one life, and if an allen touches you, you ill esplode. Tyou manage to kil al of the stera without dying, you wil win th game Authough loselose is a video-game, everything that happens whl while you play is rea Each aien is procedurally generated out of a Sie on your computer. When you kill an alen, the fie it was created from is destroyed On the other hand, if you are kiled, the applcation itat wil be di stroyed 00:54 Lose/Lose is a video-game with real life consequences. Each alien in the game is created based on a random file on the players computer. If the player kills the alien, the file it is based on is deleted. If the players ship is destroyed, the application itself is deleted Although touching aliens will cause the player to lose the game, and killing aliens awards points, the aliens will never actually fire at the player. This calls into question the player's mission, which is never explicitly stated, only hinted at through classic game mechanics. Is the player supposed to be an aggressor? Or merely an observer, traversing through a dangerous land? Why do we assume that because we are given a weapon an awarded for using it, that doing so is right? By way of exploring what it means to kill in a video-game, Lose/Lose broaches bigger questions. As technology grows, our understanding of it diminishes, yet, at the same time, it becomes increasingly important in our lives. At what point does our virtual data become as important to us as physical possessions? If we have reached that point already, what real objects do we value less than our data? What implications does trusting something so important to something we maderoviad menetichave? AH YES. MY FAVOURITE FRIENDLY COMPUTER GAME
observer: Teacher: You have to make an innocent
 computer game!
 Me:
 Hose/lose
 from zach gage
 loselose is a game about choice and consequence, and b
 what it means to sucoeed or fail
 You play the role of a space captain on a seemingly endless quest to
 dectroy aftacking aliens. You receive one point for each alien you kil
 You have one life, and if an allen touches you, you ill esplode.
 Tyou manage to kil al of the stera without dying, you wil win th
 game
 Authough loselose is a video-game, everything that happens whl
 while you
 play is rea
 Each aien is procedurally generated out of a Sie on your computer.
 When you kill an alen, the fie it was created from is destroyed
 On the other hand, if you are kiled, the applcation itat wil be di
 stroyed
 00:54
 Lose/Lose is a video-game with real life consequences. Each alien in the
 game is created based on a random file on the players computer. If the player kills
 the alien, the file it is based on is deleted. If the players ship is destroyed, the
 application itself is deleted
 Although touching aliens will cause the player to lose the game, and killing aliens
 awards points, the aliens will never actually fire at the player. This calls into
 question the player's mission, which is never explicitly stated, only hinted at
 through classic game mechanics. Is the player supposed to be an aggressor? Or
 merely an observer, traversing through a dangerous land?
 Why do we assume that because we are given a weapon an awarded for using it,
 that doing so is right?
 By way of exploring what it means to kill in a video-game, Lose/Lose broaches
 bigger questions. As technology grows, our understanding of it diminishes, yet, at
 the same time, it becomes increasingly important in our lives. At what point does
 our virtual data become as important to us as physical possessions? If we have
 reached that point already, what real objects do we value less than our data?
 What implications does trusting something so important to something we
 maderoviad menetichave?
AH YES. MY FAVOURITE FRIENDLY COMPUTER GAME

AH YES. MY FAVOURITE FRIENDLY COMPUTER GAME

observer: gotham city by meg INT. WAREHOUSE NIGHT The discordant SCREECH of a wooden chair's being dragged across a concrete floor echoes through the spacious yet deserted warehouse. The tinted lights are dim, some flickering without any discernible pattern. A heavy pair of boots stomp rhythmically as an man makes his way across the room, the chair firmly in his grip. The man, a nameless HENCHMAN type, is who someone with manners would refer to as "burly" or "built." He stops underneath the brightest light in the room, setting the chair down and revealing its occupant. He is wearing a golden "RR" symbol decorating his chest. Despite the sack covering his features, one can still make out his raven hair poking out of the burlap fabric. a uniform of sorts, with black and red details plus HENCHMAN (gruff) Seems like the Batman... is losing his touch RED ROBIN's head twitches underneath the sack. RED ROBIN (muffled) Do I look like Batman to you? The henchman circles the teen like a tiger stalking its prey, if that tiger had one too many antelope dinners. He forces out a deep and planned LAUGH HENCHMAN No, no, no. Much too small, you are Red Robin shifts in his seat. Inaudible muffling can be heard from underneath the sack. HENCHMAN (CONT'D) Shhh, little bird. You must save your breath! Air will get spare quite soon. Henchman LAUGHS again, but this time his voice horribly cracks. He COUGHS quickly, but the damage was done. Red Robin shifts in his seat once more in the following uncomfortable silence. HENCHMAN (CONT'D) So tell me- 2. Henchman tries to restore the tense atmosphere by slipping an obnoxiously sized syringe full of mysterious liquid out of a package hidden in his coat pocket. HENCHMAN (CONT'D) Where is the bat? My employer just wants to... chat. Red Robin drops his head to the side, effectively communicating a "bitch, please" without the spoken word. Henchman menacingly shakes his head as he stalks toward the teen HENCHMAN (CONT'D) I had a feeling you were the dumb robin A voice suddenly cuts through the heavy air. RED HOOD (from above) Damn right! The man drops the syringe in surprise, eliciting CRASH Red Robin perks up at the dialogue, using the hand that was supposedly tied to the splintering wooden chair to lift the sack from his head. a horrid RED ROBIN (yelling) I resent that! More bickering voices start to emerge from the darkened catwalk above the factory floor. The henchman stands stunned SPOILER Hey, don't say that! sensitive. He's ROBIN Weakest Robin, maybe. Getting himself kidnapped by this oaf? Disgraceful RED ROBIN (yelling) We literally planned this! It was your idea! Red Robin starts untying the ropes around his ankles. 3. ROBIN Maybe there's a reason you're always playing kidnapped! RED ROBIN (yelling) Because you guys are jerks? NIGHTWING Hey, I volunteered to be kidnapped this time! BATGIRL Oh, honey. We all know how that would play out. A communal GROAN emits from the batkids as they reminisce on the last time Dick volunteered to play kidnapped. RED HOOD I take it back, Wing's the dumb Robin NIGHTWING OKAY, first of all, not my fault- the fire was The batkids devolve into unintelligible BICKERING. To an outside observer, it would seem as Red Robin is yelling into darkness filled with disembodied voices. Henchman SPUTTERS, unable to form coherent words. HENCHMAN H-hey! You- You can't- ALL BATKIDS (yelling) Shut up! The henchman shuts his gaping mouth with the CLICK of his teeth HENCHΜΑΝ (talking to himself) I 'm not getting out of this, am 1? A pair of white eyes cut through the darkness behind him ΒΑΤΜAΝ No outoftheframework: outoftheframework: so a little fun tidbit about me is that i write screenplays. i challenged myself to write one in fifteen minutes, unedited, and then post it. this is what happened. enjoy? so so so thankful and in awe to the response to this post. I love screenwriting and it would be my pleasure to provide you guys with more high quality work in the future, y’all make me so happy.thank you :)
observer: gotham city
 by
 meg

 INT. WAREHOUSE
 NIGHT
 The discordant SCREECH of a wooden chair's being dragged
 across a concrete floor echoes through the spacious yet
 deserted warehouse. The tinted lights are dim, some
 flickering without any discernible pattern. A heavy pair of
 boots stomp rhythmically as an man makes his way across the
 room, the chair firmly in his grip. The man, a nameless
 HENCHMAN type, is who someone with manners would refer to
 as "burly" or "built."
 He stops underneath the brightest light in the room,
 setting the chair down and revealing its occupant. He is
 wearing
 a golden "RR" symbol decorating his chest. Despite the sack
 covering his features, one can still make out his raven
 hair poking out of the burlap fabric.
 a uniform of sorts, with black and red details plus
 HENCHMAN
 (gruff)
 Seems like the Batman... is losing
 his touch
 RED ROBIN's head twitches underneath the sack.
 RED ROBIN
 (muffled)
 Do I look like Batman to you?
 The henchman circles the teen like a
 tiger stalking its
 prey, if that tiger had one too many antelope dinners. He
 forces out a deep and planned LAUGH
 HENCHMAN
 No, no, no. Much too small, you
 are
 Red Robin shifts in his seat. Inaudible muffling can be
 heard from underneath the sack.
 HENCHMAN (CONT'D)
 Shhh, little bird. You must save
 your breath! Air will get spare
 quite soon.
 Henchman LAUGHS again, but this time his voice horribly
 cracks. He COUGHS quickly, but the damage was done. Red
 Robin shifts in his seat once more in the following
 uncomfortable silence.
 HENCHMAN (CONT'D)
 So tell me-

 2.
 Henchman tries to restore the tense atmosphere by slipping
 an obnoxiously sized syringe full of mysterious liquid out
 of a package hidden in his coat pocket.
 HENCHMAN (CONT'D)
 Where is the bat? My employer just
 wants to... chat.
 Red Robin drops his head to the side, effectively
 communicating
 a "bitch, please" without the spoken word.
 Henchman menacingly shakes his head as he stalks toward the
 teen
 HENCHMAN (CONT'D)
 I had a feeling you were the dumb
 robin
 A voice suddenly cuts through the heavy air.
 RED HOOD
 (from above)
 Damn right!
 The man drops the syringe in surprise, eliciting
 CRASH Red Robin perks up at the dialogue, using the hand
 that was supposedly tied to the splintering wooden chair to
 lift the sack from his head.
 a horrid
 RED ROBIN
 (yelling)
 I resent that!
 More bickering voices start to emerge from the darkened
 catwalk above the factory floor. The henchman stands
 stunned
 SPOILER
 Hey, don't say that!
 sensitive.
 He's
 ROBIN
 Weakest Robin, maybe. Getting
 himself kidnapped by this oaf?
 Disgraceful
 RED ROBIN
 (yelling)
 We literally planned this! It was
 your idea!
 Red Robin starts untying the ropes around his ankles.

 3.
 ROBIN
 Maybe there's a reason you're
 always playing kidnapped!
 RED ROBIN
 (yelling)
 Because you guys are
 jerks?
 NIGHTWING
 Hey, I volunteered to be kidnapped
 this time!
 BATGIRL
 Oh, honey. We all know how that
 would play out.
 A communal GROAN emits from the batkids as they reminisce
 on the last time Dick volunteered to play kidnapped.
 RED HOOD
 I take it back, Wing's the dumb
 Robin
 NIGHTWING
 OKAY, first of all,
 not my fault-
 the fire was
 The batkids devolve into unintelligible BICKERING. To an
 outside observer, it would seem as Red Robin is yelling
 into darkness filled with disembodied voices.
 Henchman SPUTTERS, unable to form coherent words.
 HENCHMAN
 H-hey! You- You can't-
 ALL BATKIDS
 (yelling)
 Shut up!
 The henchman shuts his gaping mouth with the CLICK of his
 teeth
 HENCHΜΑΝ
 (talking to himself)
 I 'm not getting out of this, am 1?
 A pair of white eyes cut through the darkness behind him
 ΒΑΤΜAΝ
 No
outoftheframework:

outoftheframework:
so a little fun tidbit about me is that i write screenplays. i challenged myself to write one in fifteen minutes, unedited, and then post it. this is what happened.

enjoy?

so so so thankful and in awe to the response to this post. I love screenwriting and it would be my pleasure to provide you guys with more high quality work in the future, y’all make me so happy.thank you :)

outoftheframework: outoftheframework: so a little fun tidbit about me is that i write screenplays. i challenged myself to write one in f...

observer: obisct lighit ray observer object <p>Science via /r/memes <a href="https://ift.tt/2rYSJoc">https://ift.tt/2rYSJoc</a></p>
observer: obisct
 lighit ray
 observer
 object
<p>Science via /r/memes <a href="https://ift.tt/2rYSJoc">https://ift.tt/2rYSJoc</a></p>

<p>Science via /r/memes <a href="https://ift.tt/2rYSJoc">https://ift.tt/2rYSJoc</a></p>

observer: - This video was shot by an observer who stood by while a St. Joseph (MO) officer was working to subdue a combative, resistant subject. Thankfully his backup was able to respond quickly to his aid. The physical and mental demands of law enforcement are taxing. It is imperative to stay trained on combative skills, physical fitness, and have a “never quit” mentality. Going into any incident you must always envision yourself succeeding. Always be prepared. - “If you seek to do battle with me this day, you will receive the best that I am capable of giving. “It may not be enough, but it will be everything that I have to give and it will be impressive for I have constantly prepared myself for this day. “I have trained, drilled and rehearsed my actions so that I might have the best chance of defeating you. “I have kept myself in peak physical condition, schooled myself in the martial skills and have become proficient in the applications of combat tactics. “You may defeat me, but I’m willing to die if necessary. I do not fear death for I have been close enough to it on enough occasions that it no longer concerns me. “But, I do fear the loss of my honor and would rather die fighting than to have it said that I was without courage. “So I will fight you, no matter how insurmountable it may seem, to the death if need be, in order that it may never be said of me that I was not a warrior.” “If you seek to do battle with me this day, you will receive the best that I am capable of giving. - Tag friends & Follow 🔊 👉🏽 @unclesamsmisguidedchildren UncleSamsMisguidedChildren BackTheBlue thinblueline policemuscle k9 BlueLivesMatter Police LEO Cop
observer: - This video was shot by an observer who stood by while a St. Joseph (MO) officer was working to subdue a combative, resistant subject. Thankfully his backup was able to respond quickly to his aid. The physical and mental demands of law enforcement are taxing. It is imperative to stay trained on combative skills, physical fitness, and have a “never quit” mentality. Going into any incident you must always envision yourself succeeding. Always be prepared. - “If you seek to do battle with me this day, you will receive the best that I am capable of giving. “It may not be enough, but it will be everything that I have to give and it will be impressive for I have constantly prepared myself for this day. “I have trained, drilled and rehearsed my actions so that I might have the best chance of defeating you. “I have kept myself in peak physical condition, schooled myself in the martial skills and have become proficient in the applications of combat tactics. “You may defeat me, but I’m willing to die if necessary. I do not fear death for I have been close enough to it on enough occasions that it no longer concerns me. “But, I do fear the loss of my honor and would rather die fighting than to have it said that I was without courage. “So I will fight you, no matter how insurmountable it may seem, to the death if need be, in order that it may never be said of me that I was not a warrior.” “If you seek to do battle with me this day, you will receive the best that I am capable of giving. - Tag friends & Follow 🔊 👉🏽 @unclesamsmisguidedchildren UncleSamsMisguidedChildren BackTheBlue thinblueline policemuscle k9 BlueLivesMatter Police LEO Cop

- This video was shot by an observer who stood by while a St. Joseph (MO) officer was working to subdue a combative, resistant subject. T...

observer: The Observer Muslim foster parents: We'd never had a Christmas tree it made them so happy <p><a href="http://ikkimikki.tumblr.com/post/168587488460/philtippett-ithelpstodream-once-the-children" class="tumblr_blog">ikkimikki</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://philtippett.tumblr.com/post/168428590826/ithelpstodream-once-the-children-were-asleep" class="tumblr_blog">philtippett</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://ithelpstodream.tumblr.com/post/168152017582/once-the-children-were-asleep-sajjad-headed-out" class="tumblr_blog">ithelpstodream</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims and we’d never had a Christmas tree in our home. But these children were Christian and we wanted them to feel connected to their culture.” </p> <p>The couple worked until the early hours putting the tree up and wrapping presents. The first thing the children saw the next morning was the tree.</p> <p>“I had never seen that kind of extra happiness and excitement on a child’s face.“ The children were meant to stay for two weeks – seven years later two of the three siblings are still living with them.</p> <p><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu">https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu</a></p> </blockquote> <p>this is a beautiful article and i just want to include a few other highlights from the above family as well as another profiled:</p> <blockquote> <p>…she focuses on the positives – in particular how fostering has given her and Sajjad an insight into a world that had been so unfamiliar. “We have learned so much about English culture and religion,” Sajjad says. Riffat would read Bible stories to the children at night and took the girls to church on Sundays. “When I read about Christianity, I don’t think there is much difference,” she says. “It all comes from God.”</p> <p>The girls, 15 and 12, have also introduced Riffat and Sajjad to the world of after-school ballet, theatre classes and going to pop concerts. “I wouldn’t see many Asian parents at those places,” she says. “But I now tell my extended family you should involve your children in these activities because it is good for their confidence.” Having the girls in her life has also made Riffat reflect on her own childhood. “I had never spent even an hour outside my home without my siblings or parents until my wedding day,” she says.</p> <p>Just as Riffat and Sajjad have learned about Christianity, the girls have come to look forward to Eid and the traditions of henna. “I’ve taught them how to make potato curry, pakoras and samosas,” Riffat says. “But their spice levels are not quite the same as ours yet.” The girls can also sing Bollywood songs and speak Urdu.</p> <p>“I now look forward to going home. I have two girls and my wife waiting,” says Sajjad. “It’s been such a blessing for me,” adds Riffat. “It fulfilled the maternal gap.”</p> <p>[…]</p> <p>Shareen’s longest foster placement arrived three years ago: a boy from Syria. “He was 14 and had hidden inside a lorry all the way from Syria,” she says. The boy was deeply traumatised. They had to communicate via Google Translate; Shareen later learned Arabic and he picked up English within six months. She read up on Syria and the political situation there to get an insight into the conditions he had left.</p> <p>“It took ages to gain his trust,” she says. “I got a picture dictionary that showed English and Arabic words and I remember one time when I pronounced an Arabic word wrong and he burst out laughing and told me I was saying it wrong – that was the breakthrough.”</p> <p>The boy would run home from school and whenever they went shopping in town, he kept asking Shareen when they were going back home. She found out why: “He told me that one day he left his house in Syria and when he had come back, there was no house.” Now he’s 18, speaks English fluently and is applying for apprenticeships. He could move out of Shareen’s home, but has decided to stay. “He is a very different person to the boy who first came here,” she says, “and my relationship with him is that of a mother to her son.”</p> </blockquote> </blockquote> <p>What a beautifully loving family. </p> </blockquote> <p>This makes my heart happy </p>
observer: The Observer
 Muslim foster parents: We'd
 never had a Christmas tree
 it made them so happy
<p><a href="http://ikkimikki.tumblr.com/post/168587488460/philtippett-ithelpstodream-once-the-children" class="tumblr_blog">ikkimikki</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://philtippett.tumblr.com/post/168428590826/ithelpstodream-once-the-children-were-asleep" class="tumblr_blog">philtippett</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="https://ithelpstodream.tumblr.com/post/168152017582/once-the-children-were-asleep-sajjad-headed-out" class="tumblr_blog">ithelpstodream</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p>Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims and we’d never had a Christmas tree in our home. But these children were Christian and we wanted them to feel connected to their culture.” </p>

<p>The couple worked until the early hours putting the tree up and wrapping presents. The first thing the children saw the next morning was the tree.</p>

<p>“I had never seen that kind of extra happiness and excitement on a child’s face.“ The children were meant to stay for two weeks – seven years later two of the three siblings are still living with them.</p>

<p><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu">https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu</a></p>
</blockquote>
<p>this is a beautiful article and i just want to include a few other highlights from the above family as well as another profiled:</p>

<blockquote>
<p>…she focuses on the positives – in particular how fostering has given her and Sajjad an insight into a world that had been so unfamiliar. “We have learned so much about English culture and religion,” Sajjad says. Riffat would read Bible stories to the children at night and took the girls to church on Sundays. “When I read about Christianity, I don’t think there is much difference,” she says. “It all comes from God.”</p>
<p>The girls, 15 and 12, have also introduced Riffat and Sajjad to the world of after-school ballet, theatre classes and going to pop concerts. “I wouldn’t see many Asian parents at those places,” she says. “But I now tell my extended family you should involve your children in these activities because it is good for their confidence.” Having the girls in her life has also made Riffat reflect on her own childhood. “I had never spent even an hour outside my home without my siblings or parents until my wedding day,” she says.</p>

<p>Just as Riffat and Sajjad have learned about Christianity, the girls have come to look forward to Eid and the traditions of henna. “I’ve taught them how to make potato curry, pakoras and samosas,” Riffat says. “But their spice levels are not quite the same as ours yet.” The girls can also sing Bollywood songs and speak Urdu.</p>

<p>“I now look forward to going home. I have two girls and my wife waiting,” says Sajjad. “It’s been such a blessing for me,” adds Riffat. “It fulfilled the maternal gap.”</p>
<p>[…]</p>
<p>Shareen’s longest foster placement arrived three years ago: a boy from Syria. “He was 14 and had hidden inside a lorry all the way from Syria,” she says. The boy was deeply traumatised. They had to communicate via Google Translate; Shareen later learned Arabic and he picked up English within six months. She read up on Syria and the political situation there to get an insight into the conditions he had left.</p>

<p>“It took ages to gain his trust,” she says. “I got a picture dictionary that showed English and Arabic words and I remember one time when I pronounced an Arabic word wrong and he burst out laughing and told me I was saying it wrong – that was the breakthrough.”</p>

<p>The boy would run home from school and whenever they went shopping in town, he kept asking Shareen when they were going back home. She found out why: “He told me that one day he left his house in Syria and when he had come back, there was no house.” Now he’s 18, speaks English fluently and is applying for apprenticeships. He could move out of Shareen’s home, but has decided to stay. “He is a very different person to the boy who first came here,” she says, “and my relationship with him is that of a mother to her son.”</p>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
<p>What a beautifully loving family. </p>
</blockquote>

<p>This makes my heart happy </p>

<p><a href="http://ikkimikki.tumblr.com/post/168587488460/philtippett-ithelpstodream-once-the-children" class="tumblr_blog">ikkimikki</a>...

observer: The Observer Muslim foster parents: We'd never had a Christmas tree it made them so happy ikkimikki: philtippett: ithelpstodream: Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims and we’d never had a Christmas tree in our home. But these children were Christian and we wanted them to feel connected to their culture.” The couple worked until the early hours putting the tree up and wrapping presents. The first thing the children saw the next morning was the tree. “I had never seen that kind of extra happiness and excitement on a child’s face.“ The children were meant to stay for two weeks – seven years later two of the three siblings are still living with them. https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu this is a beautiful article and i just want to include a few other highlights from the above family as well as another profiled: …she focuses on the positives – in particular how fostering has given her and Sajjad an insight into a world that had been so unfamiliar. “We have learned so much about English culture and religion,” Sajjad says. Riffat would read Bible stories to the children at night and took the girls to church on Sundays. “When I read about Christianity, I don’t think there is much difference,” she says. “It all comes from God.” The girls, 15 and 12, have also introduced Riffat and Sajjad to the world of after-school ballet, theatre classes and going to pop concerts. “I wouldn’t see many Asian parents at those places,” she says. “But I now tell my extended family you should involve your children in these activities because it is good for their confidence.” Having the girls in her life has also made Riffat reflect on her own childhood. “I had never spent even an hour outside my home without my siblings or parents until my wedding day,” she says. Just as Riffat and Sajjad have learned about Christianity, the girls have come to look forward to Eid and the traditions of henna. “I’ve taught them how to make potato curry, pakoras and samosas,” Riffat says. “But their spice levels are not quite the same as ours yet.” The girls can also sing Bollywood songs and speak Urdu. “I now look forward to going home. I have two girls and my wife waiting,” says Sajjad. “It’s been such a blessing for me,” adds Riffat. “It fulfilled the maternal gap.” […] Shareen’s longest foster placement arrived three years ago: a boy from Syria. “He was 14 and had hidden inside a lorry all the way from Syria,” she says. The boy was deeply traumatised. They had to communicate via Google Translate; Shareen later learned Arabic and he picked up English within six months. She read up on Syria and the political situation there to get an insight into the conditions he had left. “It took ages to gain his trust,” she says. “I got a picture dictionary that showed English and Arabic words and I remember one time when I pronounced an Arabic word wrong and he burst out laughing and told me I was saying it wrong – that was the breakthrough.” The boy would run home from school and whenever they went shopping in town, he kept asking Shareen when they were going back home. She found out why: “He told me that one day he left his house in Syria and when he had come back, there was no house.” Now he’s 18, speaks English fluently and is applying for apprenticeships. He could move out of Shareen’s home, but has decided to stay. “He is a very different person to the boy who first came here,” she says, “and my relationship with him is that of a mother to her son.” What a beautifully loving family.
observer: The Observer
 Muslim foster parents: We'd
 never had a Christmas tree
 it made them so happy
ikkimikki:
philtippett:

ithelpstodream:

Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims and we’d never had a Christmas tree in our home. But these children were Christian and we wanted them to feel connected to their culture.” 

The couple worked until the early hours putting the tree up and wrapping presents. The first thing the children saw the next morning was the tree.

“I had never seen that kind of extra happiness and excitement on a child’s face.“ The children were meant to stay for two weeks – seven years later two of the three siblings are still living with them.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/dec/03/muslim-foster-parents-it-has-been-such-a-blessing?CMP=fb_gu

this is a beautiful article and i just want to include a few other highlights from the above family as well as another profiled:


…she focuses on the positives – in particular how fostering has given her and Sajjad an insight into a world that had been so unfamiliar. “We have learned so much about English culture and religion,” Sajjad says. Riffat would read Bible stories to the children at night and took the girls to church on Sundays. “When I read about Christianity, I don’t think there is much difference,” she says. “It all comes from God.”
The girls, 15 and 12, have also introduced Riffat and Sajjad to the world of after-school ballet, theatre classes and going to pop concerts. “I wouldn’t see many Asian parents at those places,” she says. “But I now tell my extended family you should involve your children in these activities because it is good for their confidence.” Having the girls in her life has also made Riffat reflect on her own childhood. “I had never spent even an hour outside my home without my siblings or parents until my wedding day,” she says.

Just as Riffat and Sajjad have learned about Christianity, the girls have come to look forward to Eid and the traditions of henna. “I’ve taught them how to make potato curry, pakoras and samosas,” Riffat says. “But their spice levels are not quite the same as ours yet.” The girls can also sing Bollywood songs and speak Urdu.

“I now look forward to going home. I have two girls and my wife waiting,” says Sajjad. “It’s been such a blessing for me,” adds Riffat. “It fulfilled the maternal gap.”
[…]
Shareen’s longest foster placement arrived three years ago: a boy from Syria. “He was 14 and had hidden inside a lorry all the way from Syria,” she says. The boy was deeply traumatised. They had to communicate via Google Translate; Shareen later learned Arabic and he picked up English within six months. She read up on Syria and the political situation there to get an insight into the conditions he had left.

“It took ages to gain his trust,” she says. “I got a picture dictionary that showed English and Arabic words and I remember one time when I pronounced an Arabic word wrong and he burst out laughing and told me I was saying it wrong – that was the breakthrough.”

The boy would run home from school and whenever they went shopping in town, he kept asking Shareen when they were going back home. She found out why: “He told me that one day he left his house in Syria and when he had come back, there was no house.” Now he’s 18, speaks English fluently and is applying for apprenticeships. He could move out of Shareen’s home, but has decided to stay. “He is a very different person to the boy who first came here,” she says, “and my relationship with him is that of a mother to her son.”


What a beautifully loving family.

ikkimikki: philtippett: ithelpstodream: Once the children were asleep, Sajjad headed out on an urgent shopping mission. “We are Muslims...