🔥 | Latest

Most Important: Well this is the most important news.via: @imaculthero
Most Important: Well this is the most important news.via: @imaculthero

Well this is the most important news.via: @imaculthero

Most Important: angelfire115: zetarays: angeredthoughts: nobodybetterhavethisoneoriswear: polyglotplatypus: polyglotplatypus: im very grateful for the lessons in photography i was taught in stop motion class because just now they made it possible to photograph the stars with my phone in spite of the camera usually not detecting the light of stars because theyre so dim,,,, enjoy these shiny motherfuckers ok so if everythings normal, your phone camera should have a manual mode (sometimes called pro mode). in it, change the settings of the shutter lag to 20 seconds, then put the phone down on some stable, plane surface and press the photo button (usually when using your camera, the volume buttons can be used as photo button) and let the phone still for the whole 20 seconds.  (basically the problem with most cameras is that they dont have a very good light sensitivity in the dark, however that doesnt mean they cant detect it at all. the longer the shutter is open, the more light your camera takes in and the more burnt/light your pic will be, so in (literally) dark situations, make the shutter lag longer to get all that light you need! also i said 20 seconds but really you can make it shorter or longer depending on what kinda stuff you want for your stars) Yes this! Additionally, adjust your ISO to the highest number (mimics the film used for very low light and low speed images) And set your shutter speed to the longest time possible (on my phone it’s 10 seconds). Leave your focus settings on Auto, and if your phone camera has a timer option, turn that on (five seconds is generally enough). Plan your shot first, then find a place to set your phone down so you can get the image you want. The less light pollution, the better; you’ll pick up FAR more stars in your picture. Once you know what you want to shoot, tap your screen to “focus” it, then hit the button to take the picture, set your phone down, and back away from the “tripod”. Don’t touch your phone for a good 15 seconds, just to be sure. You will not be disappointed in the results, let me assure you. Not even a little bit. @tamberland THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING I’VE EVER LEARNED
Most Important: angelfire115:

zetarays:

angeredthoughts:

nobodybetterhavethisoneoriswear:

polyglotplatypus:

polyglotplatypus:
im very grateful for the lessons in photography i was taught in stop motion class because just now they made it possible to photograph the stars with my phone in spite of the camera usually not detecting the light of stars because theyre so dim,,,, enjoy these shiny motherfuckers
ok so if everythings normal, your phone camera should have a manual mode (sometimes called pro mode). in it, change the settings of the shutter lag to 20 seconds, then put the phone down on some stable, plane surface and press the photo button (usually when using your camera, the volume buttons can be used as photo button) and let the phone still for the whole 20 seconds. 
(basically the problem with most cameras is that they dont have a very good light sensitivity in the dark, however that doesnt mean they cant detect it at all. the longer the shutter is open, the more light your camera takes in and the more burnt/light your pic will be, so in (literally) dark situations, make the shutter lag longer to get all that light you need! also i said 20 seconds but really you can make it shorter or longer depending on what kinda stuff you want for your stars)

Yes this! 
Additionally, adjust your ISO to the highest number (mimics the film used for very low light and low speed images)
And set your shutter speed to the longest time possible (on my phone it’s 10 seconds).
Leave your focus settings on Auto, and if your phone camera has a timer option, turn that on (five seconds is generally enough).
Plan your shot first, then find a place to set your phone down so you can get the image you want. The less light pollution, the better; you’ll pick up FAR more stars in your picture.
Once you know what you want to shoot, tap your screen to “focus” it, then hit the button to take the picture, set your phone down, and back away from the “tripod”. Don’t touch your phone for a good 15 seconds, just to be sure.
You will not be disappointed in the results, let me assure you.
Not even a little bit.

@tamberland

THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING I’VE EVER LEARNED

angelfire115: zetarays: angeredthoughts: nobodybetterhavethisoneoriswear: polyglotplatypus: polyglotplatypus: im very grateful for t...

Most Important: omgcheckplease: ★ Notes on Year 4, Comic 26 - Check, Please ★In the summer of 2013, I was fully mourning my completed time as an undergraduate at Yale. One of the college’s traditional songs—which they strategically have students sing during their first weeks as Yalies and then again at the moment we’re conferred our degrees—goes like this:Bright College years, with pleasure rife,The shortest, gladdest years of life;How swiftly are ye gliding by!Oh, why doth time so quickly fly?Et cetera. The first time you sing it, you mumble the words and don’t know a single person around you. The last time you sing it, wearing the mortarboard and gown, you’ve got the lyrics memorized and you’re surrounded by some of the most important people in your life.That summer, with “How bright will seem, through mem’ry’s haze/ Those happy, golden, bygone days!” still ringing in my ears, I started CHECK, PLEASE. The comic’s first panels emerged on an ancient laptop, through a borrowed bamboo tablet, and on a free drawing program called gnu-IMPShop. I had no plan. I wanted to explore my newfound fascination with hockey and share silly cartoons on Tumblr. But unconsciously, I also wanted to pour the nostalgia of those bright college years into the Haus, Faber, Samwell, and Bitty’s story. I wanted to bottle up those moments where we grow and change and fall down and pick ourselves back up. Drawing CHECK, PLEASE was how I revisited those experiences and how I sifted through the bittersweet feeling of concluding something I loved. Perhaps this is why finishing CHECK, PLEASE calls back those same emotions. Just as Bitty would bake affection into a pie, I might have encoded into CHECK, PLEASE the heartfelt fondness I had for my time in college, the love of the friends I made there, and the gratitude I have for my own growth.I have always found it easier to express gratitude face to face. And even though I would not have gotten to meet all of you, the greatest downside of being unable to participate in a book tour is that I can’t say thanks in person. I could write a thousand words, yet they couldn’t replace a high five at a bookstore signing or a handshake at a convention. I could write the blog post to end all blog posts, but it’s not the same as yelling with you about an episode or chatting about a fandom we both happen be in. For me, it’s those moments that somehow equate to my abundant appreciation for you, the reader.I look forward to the day when I can let my actions speak louder than my words!In the meantime: thank you. I am incredibly blessed to get to create a story and then share it. This is all I want to do in life. These characters get to have a readership overflowing with love and enthusiasm for them. This comic, somehow, has found ambassadors. This story gets to be told. Thank you! I’m excited to share with you the unusual, fun, and hopeful narratives I’m working hard to develop.So with that, I’ll sign off on the last blog post! Thank you for reading this comic. Thank you for sharing it with friends. Thank you for caring about Bitty’s story and CHECK, PLEASE.Thank you!John J. Johnson.Just kidding, it’s Ngozi. :^) Tee hee. Bye now!
Most Important: omgcheckplease:

★ Notes on Year 4, Comic 26 - Check, Please ★In the summer of 2013, I was fully mourning my completed time as an undergraduate at Yale. One of the college’s traditional songs—which they strategically have students sing during their first weeks as Yalies and then again at the moment we’re conferred our degrees—goes like this:Bright College years, with pleasure rife,The shortest, gladdest years of life;How swiftly are ye gliding by!Oh, why doth time so quickly fly?Et cetera. The first time you sing it, you mumble the words and don’t know a single person around you. The last time you sing it, wearing the mortarboard and gown, you’ve got the lyrics memorized and you’re surrounded by some of the most important people in your life.That summer, with “How bright will seem, through mem’ry’s haze/ Those happy, golden, bygone days!” still ringing in my ears, I started CHECK, PLEASE. The comic’s first panels emerged on an ancient laptop, through a borrowed bamboo tablet, and on a free drawing program called gnu-IMPShop. I had no plan. I wanted to explore my newfound fascination with hockey and share silly cartoons on Tumblr. But unconsciously, I also wanted to pour the nostalgia of those bright college years into the Haus, Faber, Samwell, and Bitty’s story. I wanted to bottle up those moments where we grow and change and fall down and pick ourselves back up. Drawing CHECK, PLEASE was how I revisited those experiences and how I sifted through the bittersweet feeling of concluding something I loved. Perhaps this is why finishing CHECK, PLEASE calls back those same emotions. Just as Bitty would bake affection into a pie, I might have encoded into CHECK, PLEASE the heartfelt fondness I had for my time in college, the love of the friends I made there, and the gratitude I have for my own growth.I have always found it easier to express gratitude face to face. And even though I would not have gotten to meet all of you, the greatest downside of being unable to participate in a book tour is that I can’t say thanks in person. I could write a thousand words, yet they couldn’t replace a high five at a bookstore signing or a handshake at a convention. I could write the blog post to end all blog posts, but it’s not the same as yelling with you about an episode or chatting about a fandom we both happen be in. For me, it’s those moments that somehow equate to my abundant appreciation for you, the reader.I look forward to the day when I can let my actions speak louder than my words!In the meantime: thank you. I am incredibly blessed to get to create a story and then share it. This is all I want to do in life. These characters get to have a readership overflowing with love and enthusiasm for them. This comic, somehow, has found ambassadors. This story gets to be told. Thank you! I’m excited to share with you the unusual, fun, and hopeful narratives I’m working hard to develop.So with that, I’ll sign off on the last blog post! Thank you for reading this comic. Thank you for sharing it with friends. Thank you for caring about Bitty’s story and CHECK, PLEASE.Thank you!John J. Johnson.Just kidding, it’s Ngozi. :^) Tee hee. Bye now!

omgcheckplease: ★ Notes on Year 4, Comic 26 - Check, Please ★In the summer of 2013, I was fully mourning my completed time as an undergr...

Most Important: Being proud is most important .
Most Important: Being proud is most important .

Being proud is most important .

Most Important: Most important teachings!
Most Important: Most important teachings!

Most important teachings!

Most Important: Even though the personality is most important
Most Important: Even though the personality is most important

Even though the personality is most important

Most Important: erinSCIF for America @erinscafe An 11-year-old told his class he was thankful that his dads were going to adopt him, and the substitute teacher told him "that's nothing to be thankful for." The three girls who stood up for this boy and went to get the principal are actual heroes. A Utah substitute told 5th graders that 'homosexuality is wrong.' She was escorted out after 3... P sltrib.com erinSCIF for America @erinscafe He "told his dads that he understood what the substitute was saying. D.M. said he didn't speak up, though, because he's had two failed adoptions before and didn't want his dads to rethink their decision, with his final court hearing coming up on Dec. 19." "He was so fearful that this could make us think that we don't want to adopt him," van Amstel said, trying not to cry. "That's definitely not going to happen. But this situation really hurt him. This person really hurt us." erinSCIF for America @erinscafe Like, these girls asked her to stop multiple times and then walked right tf out of class and straight to her boss. The kids are all right. Three girls asked her to stop multiple times. But she continued, so they walked out of the room to get the principal. As the substitute was escorted out of the building, she was still arguing, trying to make her point, the boy's fathers say they were told by school officials. "She also tried to blame our son," said one of the boy's dads, Louis van Amstel, “and told him that it was his fault that she went off." endangered-justice-seeker: One of the most important things you can teach your kids is when and how to say no to authority figures. Off-topic but what odd bowties.
Most Important: erinSCIF for America
 @erinscafe
 An 11-year-old told his class he was
 thankful that his dads were going to
 adopt him, and the substitute teacher
 told him "that's nothing to be
 thankful for."
 The three girls who stood up for this
 boy and went to get the principal are
 actual heroes.
 A Utah substitute told 5th graders that 'homosexuality
 is wrong.' She was escorted out after 3...
 P sltrib.com

 erinSCIF for America
 @erinscafe
 He "told his dads that he understood
 what the substitute was saying. D.M.
 said he didn't speak up, though,
 because he's had two failed
 adoptions before and didn't want his
 dads to rethink their decision, with his
 final court hearing coming up on Dec.
 19."
 "He was so fearful that this could make us
 think that we don't want to adopt him,"
 van Amstel said, trying not to cry. "That's
 definitely not going to happen. But this
 situation really hurt him. This person
 really hurt us."

 erinSCIF for America
 @erinscafe
 Like, these girls asked her to stop
 multiple times and then walked right
 tf out of class and straight to her
 boss.
 The kids are all right.
 Three girls asked her to stop multiple
 times. But she continued, so they walked
 out of the room to get the principal.
 As the substitute was escorted out of the
 building, she was still arguing, trying to
 make her point, the boy's fathers say they
 were told by school officials.
 "She also tried to blame our son," said one
 of the boy's dads, Louis van Amstel, “and
 told him that it was his fault that she went
 off."
endangered-justice-seeker:


One of the most important things you can teach your kids is when and how to say no to authority figures.




Off-topic but what odd bowties.

endangered-justice-seeker: One of the most important things you can teach your kids is when and how to say no to authority figures....

Most Important: Why Did God Create Atheists? There is a famous story told in Chassidic literature that addresses this very question. The Master teaches the student that God created everything in the world to be appreciated, since everything is here to teach us a lesson. One clever student asks "What lesson can we learn from atheists? Why did God create them?" The Master responds "God created atheists to teach us the most important lesson of them allthe lesson of true compassion. You see, when an atheist performs and act of charity, visits someone who is sick, helps someone in need, and cares for the world, he is not doing so because of some religious teaching. He does not believe that god commanded him to perform this act. In fact, he does not believe in God at all, so his acts are based on an inner sense of morality. And look at the kindness he can bestow upon others simply because he feels it to be right." "This means," the Master continued "that when someone reaches out to you for help, you should never say 'I pray that God will help you. Instead for the moment, you should become an atheist, imagine that there is no God who can help, and say I will help you." ETA source: Tales of Hasidim Vol. 2 by Mar razairazerci I started reading this and was worried it would be something attacking atheists, or bashing religion, but this makes me really, really happy. naamahdarling imagine that there is no God who can help, and say 'I will help you." Holy shit. Holy shit. Yes. YES. obsessedwithamedot THIS Why God created Atheists
Most Important: Why Did God Create Atheists?
 There is a famous story told in Chassidic literature that addresses this
 very question. The Master teaches the student that God created
 everything in the world to be appreciated, since everything is here to
 teach us a lesson.
 One clever student asks "What lesson can we learn from atheists? Why
 did God create them?"
 The Master responds "God created atheists to teach us the most
 important lesson of them allthe lesson of true compassion. You see,
 when an atheist performs and act of charity, visits someone who is sick,
 helps someone in need, and cares for the world, he is not doing so
 because of some religious teaching. He does not believe that god
 commanded him to perform this act. In fact, he does not believe in God
 at all, so his acts are based on an inner sense of morality. And look at
 the kindness he can bestow upon others simply because he feels it to
 be right."
 "This means," the Master continued "that when someone reaches out to
 you for help, you should never say 'I pray that God will help you. Instead
 for the moment, you should become an atheist, imagine that there is no
 God who can help, and say I will help you."
 ETA source: Tales of Hasidim Vol. 2 by Mar
 razairazerci
 I started reading this and was worried it would be something attacking
 atheists, or bashing religion, but this makes me really, really happy.
 naamahdarling
 imagine that there is no God who can help, and say 'I will help you."
 Holy shit.
 Holy shit.
 Yes. YES.
 obsessedwithamedot
 THIS
Why God created Atheists

Why God created Atheists

Most Important: tumblr Year in Review Social Impact 2019 2019 fandom: Tumblr and Social Impact in 2019For 2019, our Social Impact team (@action​) compiled trends they saw across the platform. From #BlackExcellence365 to National Hispanic Heritage Month, there’s no doubt that Tumblr’s community is incredibly passionate about and dedicated to social issues. During Women’s History Month, we shared stories from Black women, trans people, women of color, and more from all industries in threads that continued throughout the year. The tag #postitforward was where many of you shared mental health stories, uplifting others in an honest and raw way. The community mobilized for climate change with the hashtag #FridaysForFuture, rose to honor new communities during our first ever #APAHM campaign, and celebrated all things LGBTQ+ year-round with #tumblr pride!When we looked at all of the data, we weren’t surprised at which issues are the most important to you, the Tumblr community. You all engaged in these conversations and put action into your words. Whether you created art, wrote, edited GIFs, or posted selfies as part of your activism, you showed up. While this list is ranked by engagement volume, there is no value judgment as to the importance of any one issue over the other.Mental healthBlack cultureFeminismPride monthEqualityIntersectional feminismClimate changeCapitalism Racism Blackout Stay passionate, Tumblr. Keep making actual change in this world, through all of the 2020s. 
Most Important: tumblr Year in Review
 Social Impact
 2019
 2019
fandom:

Tumblr and Social Impact in 2019For 2019, our Social Impact team (@action​) compiled trends they saw across the platform. From #BlackExcellence365 to National Hispanic Heritage Month, there’s no doubt that Tumblr’s community is incredibly passionate about and dedicated to social issues. During Women’s History Month, we shared stories from Black women, trans people, women of color, and more from all industries in threads that continued throughout the year. The tag #postitforward was where many of you shared mental health stories, uplifting others in an honest and raw way. The community mobilized for climate change with the hashtag #FridaysForFuture, rose to honor new communities during our first ever #APAHM campaign, and celebrated all things LGBTQ+ year-round with #tumblr pride!When we looked at all of the data, we weren’t surprised at which issues are the most important to you, the Tumblr community. You all engaged in these conversations and put action into your words. Whether you created art, wrote, edited GIFs, or posted selfies as part of your activism, you showed up. While this list is ranked by engagement volume, there is no value judgment as to the importance of any one issue over the other.Mental healthBlack cultureFeminismPride monthEqualityIntersectional feminismClimate changeCapitalism Racism Blackout Stay passionate, Tumblr. Keep making actual change in this world, through all of the 2020s. 

fandom: Tumblr and Social Impact in 2019For 2019, our Social Impact team (@action​) compiled trends they saw across the platform. From #...