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Community, Drugs, and Homeless: an account you reported @babadookspinoza Follow "Giving people homes" YEAH NO SHIT When Europe gets it right It's a miracle': Helsinki's radical solution to homelessness Finland is the only EU country where homelessness is falling. Its secret? Giving people homes as soon as they need them- unconditionally 3:34 PM -3 Jun 2019 3,568 Retweets 12,641 Likes Julesy @julesprom Follow "you can't just give people homes for free" actually you can and it turns out to be a cheaper alternative for cities and communities than having a homeless population "but no one wants to have to pay for all this" its literally cheaper and benefits everyone in the community an account you reported @babadookspinoza "Giving people homes" YEAH NO SHIT Is amiracle': Helsinki's radical solution to homelessness Show this thread y d 10:53 PM -3 Jun 2019 7,235 Retweets 16,637 Likes bemusedlybespectacled: jethroq: goawfma: who would have thought that the solution to homelessness is providing people with housing? 🧐 The solution isn’t 100% perfect, there’s a lot of people who aren’t technically homeless because they live with other people for free etc. but yeah this does majorly help reduce risks for vulnerable people. Here’s the big thing about it that might scandalize Americans even more so than the idea of free housing: you don’t have to do anything to “deserve it.” Most countries use what’s called “the staircase model” – you start by being in shelter, then maybe a halfway house, then permanent housing. You can “move up” by going through rehab or getting a job or accessing other services. The idea is that housing is something you get as a reward for good behavior, not something you get by right. But with the housing first model, you get the house first, and then deal with everything else. It’s a lot easier to stop using drugs and alcohol when you have other ways to pass the time and aren’t under constant stress. It’s a lot easier to get a job when you have an address to put on your applications. It’s a lot easier to treat mental illness when you’re in a safe place that doesn’t add to your fear and pain. But if your mentality is that housing is something only the morally pure and socially acceptable deserve, and the only way to get it is for people to jump through hoops to prove their goodness, then of course you’re going to hate this model.
Community, Drugs, and Homeless: an account you reported
 @babadookspinoza
 Follow
 "Giving people homes" YEAH NO SHIT
 When Europe gets it right
 It's a miracle': Helsinki's
 radical solution to
 homelessness
 Finland is the only EU country where
 homelessness is falling. Its secret? Giving
 people homes as soon as they need them-
 unconditionally
 3:34 PM -3 Jun 2019
 3,568 Retweets 12,641 Likes

 Julesy
 @julesprom
 Follow
 "you can't just give people homes for
 free"
 actually you can and it turns out to be a
 cheaper alternative for cities and
 communities than having a homeless
 population
 "but no one wants to have to pay for all
 this"
 its literally cheaper and benefits
 everyone in the community
 an account you reported @babadookspinoza
 "Giving people homes" YEAH NO SHIT
 Is amiracle': Helsinki's
 radical solution to
 homelessness
 Show this thread
 y
 d
 10:53 PM -3 Jun 2019
 7,235 Retweets 16,637 Likes
bemusedlybespectacled:
jethroq:

goawfma:
who would have thought that the solution to homelessness is providing people with housing? 🧐
The solution isn’t 100% perfect, there’s a lot of people who aren’t technically homeless because they live with other people for free etc. but yeah this does majorly help reduce risks for vulnerable people.

Here’s the big thing about it that might scandalize Americans even more so than the idea of free housing: you don’t have to do anything to “deserve it.” Most countries use what’s called “the staircase model” – you start by being in shelter, then maybe a halfway house, then permanent housing. You can “move up” by going through rehab or getting a job or accessing other services. The idea is that housing is something you get as a reward for good behavior, not something you get by right.
But with the housing first model, you get the house first, and then deal with everything else. It’s a lot easier to stop using drugs and alcohol when you have other ways to pass the time and aren’t under constant stress. It’s a lot easier to get a job when you have an address to put on your applications. It’s a lot easier to treat mental illness when you’re in a safe place that doesn’t add to your fear and pain. But if your mentality is that housing is something only the morally pure and socially acceptable deserve, and the only way to get it is for people to jump through hoops to prove their goodness, then of course you’re going to hate this model.

bemusedlybespectacled: jethroq: goawfma: who would have thought that the solution to homelessness is providing people with housing? 🧐 The s...

Fucking, Jail, and Lawyer: MSNBC eMSNBC @MSNBC Thousands of immigrants forced into solitary confinement by ICE for being physically disabled or gay. NEWS Thousands of immigrants suffer in solitary confinement in U.S. detention centers Newly obtained documents show that ICE detainees are sometimes placed in solitary for reasons that have nothing to do with rule violations By Hannah Rappleye, Andrew W. Lehren, Spencer Woodman and Vanessa Swales MCND Thousands of immigrants forced into solitary confinement by ICE msnbc.com 12:13 PM May 21, 2019 Social Flow 4.5K Retweets 2.9K Likes nerd-on-duty: thingsfacebookislike: biglawbear: loud-and-queer: thatpettyblackgirl: TELL US AGAIN THAT THE NAZI COMPARISONS ARE HYPERBOLIC https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/immigration/thousands-immigrants-suffer-solitary-confinement-u-s-detention-centers-n1007881 Holy shit read the fucking article This administration needs to be tried in the ICC for crimes against humanity Three or four specifically discussed cases (and many more not explicitly mentioned) of named trans women being put in solitary for being trans. Often for months. (One case was like, almost a year.) Over 60 wheelchair users being put in solitary for using wheelchairs. Gay people being put in solitary for consensual kissing. Suicidal people being put in Even Worse Solitary for not wanting to survive the Slightly Less Horrid Solitary. “The mentally ill placed in isolation for reasons that included attempting suicide, being the victim of a physical attack or exhibiting behavior related to their mental illness.” “A Guatemalan man spent two months in solitary confinement at a county jail in Maryland. The reason: He had a prosthetic leg.” “A mentally ill Ukrainian man was put in isolation for 15 days at a detention facility in Arizona. His offense: putting half a green pepper in one of his socks.” “Moises Tino‐Lopez, 23, from Guatemala, died in 2016 in an isolation cell. Once in isolation, the facility did not ensure he got needed anti-seizure medication. He then died from a seizure.” (And they gave no reason for putting him in isolation, either.) And they only keep records of solitaries over 14 days. All the cases listed here are 15+ days of solitary, otherwise they wouldn’t even be on the record. Only 11% of detainees have lawyers. Once you’re in solitary, you pretty much can’t call your lawyer anymore even if you have one. You certainly can’t get one if you hadn’t had one before. The United Nations special rapporteur on torture has said that solitary confinement can amount to “torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment,” and that isolation for more than 15 days should be banned, except in exceptional circumstances.
Fucking, Jail, and Lawyer: MSNBC
 eMSNBC
 @MSNBC
 Thousands of immigrants forced into
 solitary confinement by ICE for being
 physically disabled or gay.
 NEWS
 Thousands of immigrants suffer in solitary
 confinement in U.S. detention centers
 Newly obtained documents show that ICE detainees are sometimes placed in solitary for reasons
 that have nothing to do with rule violations
 By Hannah Rappleye, Andrew W. Lehren, Spencer Woodman and Vanessa Swales
 MCND
 Thousands of immigrants forced into solitary
 confinement by ICE
 msnbc.com
 12:13 PM May 21, 2019 Social Flow
 4.5K Retweets
 2.9K Likes
nerd-on-duty:

thingsfacebookislike:

biglawbear:


loud-and-queer:

thatpettyblackgirl:

TELL US AGAIN THAT THE NAZI COMPARISONS ARE HYPERBOLIC


https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/immigration/thousands-immigrants-suffer-solitary-confinement-u-s-detention-centers-n1007881


Holy shit read the fucking article


This administration needs to be tried in the ICC for crimes against humanity 


Three or four specifically discussed cases (and many more not explicitly mentioned)  of named trans women being put in solitary for being trans. Often for months. (One case was like, almost a year.)
Over 60 wheelchair users being put in solitary for using wheelchairs.
Gay people being put in solitary for consensual kissing.
Suicidal people being put in Even Worse Solitary for not wanting to survive the Slightly Less Horrid Solitary.
“The mentally ill placed in isolation for reasons that included attempting suicide, being the victim of a physical attack or exhibiting behavior related to their mental illness.”
“A Guatemalan man spent two months in solitary confinement at a county jail in Maryland. The reason: He had a prosthetic leg.”
“A mentally ill Ukrainian man was put in isolation for 15 days at a detention facility in Arizona. His offense: putting half a green pepper in one of his socks.”
“Moises Tino‐Lopez, 23, from Guatemala, died in 2016 in an isolation cell. Once in isolation, the facility did not ensure he got needed anti-seizure medication. He then died from a seizure.” (And they gave no reason for putting him in isolation, either.)
And they only keep records of solitaries over 14 days. All the cases listed here are 15+ days of solitary, otherwise they wouldn’t even be on the record.
Only 11% of detainees have lawyers. Once you’re in solitary, you pretty much can’t call your lawyer anymore even if you have one. You certainly can’t get one if you hadn’t had one before.
The United Nations special rapporteur on torture has said that solitary confinement can amount to “torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment,” and that isolation for more than 15 days should be banned, except in exceptional circumstances.

nerd-on-duty: thingsfacebookislike: biglawbear: loud-and-queer: thatpettyblackgirl: TELL US AGAIN THAT THE NAZI COMPARISONS ARE HYPERB...

Being Alone, Fall, and Love: vajeentambourine Your mixed feelings about your parents are valid. Shout out to people like me who have parents who are loving but are black holes of emotional labor... It took me a long time to realize that it's okay to have mixed feelings about your parents, about your relationship with them Sometimes parents can love you but be somewhat toxic to you and your growth and that's a very hard realization to come to if you, like me, grew up extremely close to them Sometimes parents can love you genuinely but lack emotional maturity, forcing you to perform disproportionate amounts of emotional labor. Some parents manifest symptoms of their mental illness in ways that are toxic to your mental illness Some parents, like mine, try so hard to be good parents but fall back on habits of emotional manipulation because they haven't processed their own traumas and are modeling behavior they grew up with. That doesn't make their behavior acceptable, and it's okay to feel exhausted and hurt when they betray you. You don't have to forgive every mistake. I want you to know that it's okay to protect yourself, to need some space apart from them. The love you have for your parents is still valid, and you are making the right decision Placing a safe emotional distance between myself and my parents has been one of the most difficult, heartbreaking processes I've ever gone through. it hurts to try to curb the strength of your own natural empathy around people you love. It feels disingenuous to your heart's natural state But I promise you, you are not hard-hearted or ungrateful, and you are not abandoning them. You are making a decision about your own emotional, mental, and spiritual health I know what it's like in that confusing grey area of love mixed with guilt and anxiety, of exhaustion and quasi-manipulation and unreciprocated emotional labor, and I promise you, you are not alone. Your mixed feelings about your parents are valid.
Being Alone, Fall, and Love: vajeentambourine
 Your mixed feelings about your
 parents are valid.
 Shout out to people like me who have parents who are loving but are black holes
 of emotional labor... It took me a long time to realize that it's okay to have mixed
 feelings about your parents, about your relationship with them
 Sometimes parents can love you but be somewhat toxic to you and your growth
 and that's a very hard realization to come to if you, like me, grew up extremely
 close to them
 Sometimes parents can love you genuinely but lack emotional maturity, forcing
 you to perform disproportionate amounts of emotional labor. Some parents
 manifest symptoms of their mental illness in ways that are toxic to your mental
 illness
 Some parents, like mine, try so hard to be good parents but fall back on habits of
 emotional manipulation because they haven't processed their own traumas and
 are modeling behavior they grew up with. That doesn't make their behavior
 acceptable, and it's okay to feel exhausted and hurt when they betray you. You
 don't have to forgive every mistake.
 I want you to know that it's okay to protect yourself, to need some space apart
 from them. The love you have for your parents is still valid, and you are making
 the right decision
 Placing a safe emotional distance between myself and my parents has been one
 of the most difficult, heartbreaking processes I've ever gone through. it hurts to
 try to curb the strength of your own natural empathy around people you love. It
 feels disingenuous to your heart's natural state
 But I promise you, you are not hard-hearted or ungrateful, and you are not
 abandoning them. You are making a decision about your own emotional, mental,
 and spiritual health
 I know what it's like in that confusing grey area of love mixed with guilt and
 anxiety, of exhaustion and quasi-manipulation and unreciprocated emotional
 labor, and I promise you, you are not alone.
 Your mixed feelings about your parents are valid.
Alive, America, and Asian: did you know? Photographer Diana Kim, whose father abandoned her when she was 5, wanted to document the lives of the homeless. Searching for subjects on the streets, she came upon a thin and distant man in rags who looked somewhat familiar. It was her father. By fate or by chance, she'd found him after 25 years. PHOTO: DIANA KIM DIDYOUKNOWBLOG.COM did-you-know: He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, medication, food, or new clothing. Eventually, he said to her: “Diana, I am so sorry for not being in your life. I am so happy that you have a family of your own now. Do better for them… … Don’t worry about me or what everyone says about me. If you want to make me proud and happy, be there for your family the way your mom and I never were. Stop trying to save everyone…just worry about yourself and your family. And don’t forget why I named you Diana, you are the light within the darkness.” So she refused to give up. After suffering a heart attack, he agreed to get help and slowly took control of his own life. One day he suddenly called her to invite her out for coffee. Later that afternoon, she wrote on her blog: “I feel like I just met my father for the first time today.” “I struggled to reconcile my feelings toward my father’s absence in my life, while continuing to care deeply for him and other homeless individuals.” “Over time, I learned to navigate through my feelings of desperation and became more vocal in my community about my father’s condition and what it’s like to watch a loved one battle mental illness.” He is now doing very well, and they are rebuilding their relationship from the ground up. “So long as we are alive in this world, every day is an opportunity to take hold of that ‘second chance.’ There is no failure unless you give up, and he never gave up. And I haven’t given up on him.” Source
Alive, America, and Asian: did you know?
 Photographer Diana Kim, whose
 father abandoned her when she
 was 5, wanted to document the
 lives of the homeless. Searching
 for subjects on the streets, she
 came upon a thin and distant man
 in rags who looked somewhat familiar.
 It was her father. By fate or by chance,
 she'd found him after 25 years.
 PHOTO: DIANA KIM
 DIDYOUKNOWBLOG.COM
did-you-know:


He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, medication, food, or new clothing.


Eventually, he said to her: “Diana, I am so sorry for not being in your life. I am so happy that you have a family of your own now. Do better for them…
… Don’t worry about me or what everyone says about me. If you want to make me proud and happy, be there for your family the way your mom and I never were. Stop trying to save everyone…just worry about yourself and your family. And don’t forget why I named you Diana, you are the light within the darkness.” So she refused to give up.
After suffering a heart attack, he agreed to get help and slowly took control of his own life.
One day he suddenly called her to invite her out for coffee. Later that afternoon, she wrote on her blog: “I feel like I just met my father for the first time today.”
“I struggled to reconcile my feelings toward my father’s absence in my life, while continuing to care deeply for him and other homeless individuals.”
“Over time, I learned to navigate through my feelings of desperation and became more vocal in my community about my father’s condition and what it’s like to watch a loved one battle mental illness.”
He is now doing very well, and they are rebuilding their relationship from the ground up. “So long as we are alive in this world, every day is an opportunity to take hold of that ‘second chance.’ There is no failure unless you give up, and he never gave up. And I haven’t given up on him.”
Source

did-you-know: He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, m...

Fire, Logic, and Moms: marzipanandminutiae reading letters from 1818 is wild "it's that time of the year when I get colds for no apparent reason again" have some Clairitin hon marzipanandminutiae But also we're not becoming allergic to everything nowadays like certain white moms fear. Allergies have always existed. They were just talked about differently Like "oh clams always turn my stomach-". Or "what a pity he was taken from us at age 5" rosslynpaladin "Well we didn't have all this fancy chronic illness stuff in the Olden Days, what did people do then??" They died, Ashleigh rowantheexplorer This is a picture tracking bullet holes on Allied planes that encountered Nazi anti-aircraft fire in WW2 At first, the military wanted to reinforce those areas, because obviously that's where the ground crews observed the most damage on returning planes. Until Hungarian-born Jewish mathematician Abraham Wald pointed out that this was the damage on the planes that made it home, and the Allies should armor the areas where there are no dots at all, because those are the places where the planes won't survive when hit. This phenomenon is called survivorship bias, a logic error where you focus on things that survived when you should really be looking at things that didn't. We have higher rates of mental illness now? Maybe that's because we've stopped killing people for being "possessed" or "witches." Higher rate of allergies? Anaphylaxis kills, and does so really fast if you don't know what's happening. Higher claims of rape? Maybe victims are less afraid of coming forward. These problems were all happening before, but now we've reinforced the medical and social structures needed to help these people survive. And we still have a long way to go. Source: marzipanandminutiae 80,557 notes Survivorship bias
Fire, Logic, and Moms: marzipanandminutiae
 reading letters from 1818 is wild
 "it's that time of the year when I get colds
 for no apparent reason again" have some
 Clairitin hon
 marzipanandminutiae
 But also we're not becoming allergic to
 everything nowadays like certain white
 moms fear. Allergies have always existed.
 They were just talked about differently
 Like "oh clams always turn my stomach-".
 Or "what a pity he was taken from us at age
 5"
 rosslynpaladin
 "Well we didn't have all this fancy chronic
 illness stuff in the Olden Days, what did
 people do then??"
 They died, Ashleigh
 rowantheexplorer
 This is a picture tracking bullet holes
 on Allied planes that encountered Nazi
 anti-aircraft fire in WW2
 At first, the military wanted to reinforce
 those areas, because obviously that's
 where the ground crews observed the
 most damage on returning planes. Until
 Hungarian-born Jewish mathematician
 Abraham Wald pointed out that this was
 the damage on the planes that made it
 home, and the Allies should armor the areas
 where there are no dots at all, because
 those are the places where the planes won't
 survive when hit. This phenomenon is called
 survivorship bias, a logic error where you
 focus on things that survived when you
 should really be looking at things that didn't.
 We have higher rates of mental illness now?
 Maybe that's because we've stopped killing
 people for being "possessed" or "witches."
 Higher rate of allergies? Anaphylaxis kills,
 and does so really fast if you don't know
 what's happening. Higher claims of rape?
 Maybe victims are less afraid of coming
 forward. These problems were all happening
 before, but now we've reinforced the medical
 and social structures needed to help these
 people survive. And we still have a long way
 to go.
 Source: marzipanandminutiae
 80,557 notes
Survivorship bias

Survivorship bias

Alive, America, and Asian: did you know? Photographer Diana Kim, whose father abandoned her when she was 5, wanted to document the lives of the homeless. Searching for subjects on the streets, she came upon a thin and distant man in rags who looked somewhat familiar. It was her father. By fate or by chance, she'd found him after 25 years. PHOTO: DIANA KIM DIDYOUKNOWBLOG.COM did-you-know: He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, medication, food, or new clothing. Eventually, he said to her: “Diana, I am so sorry for not being in your life. I am so happy that you have a family of your own now. Do better for them…… Don’t worry about me or what everyone says about me. If you want to make me proud and happy, be there for your family the way your mom and I never were. Stop trying to save everyone…just worry about yourself and your family. And don’t forget why I named you Diana, you are the light within the darkness.” So she refused to give up.After suffering a heart attack, he agreed to get help and slowly took control of his own life.One day he suddenly called her to invite her out for coffee. Later that afternoon, she wrote on her blog: “I feel like I just met my father for the first time today.”“I struggled to reconcile my feelings toward my father’s absence in my life, while continuing to care deeply for him and other homeless individuals.”“Over time, I learned to navigate through my feelings of desperation and became more vocal in my community about my father’s condition and what it’s like to watch a loved one battle mental illness.”He is now doing very well, and they are rebuilding their relationship from the ground up. “So long as we are alive in this world, every day is an opportunity to take hold of that ‘second chance.’ There is no failure unless you give up, and he never gave up. And I haven’t given up on him.”Source
Alive, America, and Asian: did you know?
 Photographer Diana Kim, whose
 father abandoned her when she
 was 5, wanted to document the
 lives of the homeless. Searching
 for subjects on the streets, she
 came upon a thin and distant man
 in rags who looked somewhat familiar.
 It was her father. By fate or by chance,
 she'd found him after 25 years.
 PHOTO: DIANA KIM
 DIDYOUKNOWBLOG.COM
did-you-know:



He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, medication, food, or new clothing.

Eventually, he said to her: “Diana, I am so sorry for not being in your life. I am so happy that you have a family of your own now. Do better for them…… Don’t worry about me or what everyone says about me. If you want to make me proud and happy, be there for your family the way your mom and I never were. Stop trying to save everyone…just worry about yourself and your family. And don’t forget why I named you Diana, you are the light within the darkness.” So she refused to give up.After suffering a heart attack, he agreed to get help and slowly took control of his own life.One day he suddenly called her to invite her out for coffee. Later that afternoon, she wrote on her blog: “I feel like I just met my father for the first time today.”“I struggled to reconcile my feelings toward my father’s absence in my life, while continuing to care deeply for him and other homeless individuals.”“Over time, I learned to navigate through my feelings of desperation and became more vocal in my community about my father’s condition and what it’s like to watch a loved one battle mental illness.”He is now doing very well, and they are rebuilding their relationship from the ground up. “So long as we are alive in this world, every day is an opportunity to take hold of that ‘second chance.’ There is no failure unless you give up, and he never gave up. And I haven’t given up on him.”Source

did-you-know: He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, ...