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Definitely, Fire, and God: royaltealovingkookiness: deeperthanswords: royaltealovingkookiness: The first training of Zuko we see, Iroh shoots a fireball right into Zuko’s face - while Zuko just stands there unflinching. It’s the very first episode, and Zuko & Iroh are the obvious villains, and it just seems like some macho bs they do.  And then comes the duel with Zhao, and Zuko is down, but when he sees that flaming fist to his face, something lets loose inside him that helps him turn the fight around…But it’s not until we learn Zuko’s backstory that all this gets a whole new meaning.  Why would Zuko still be on basics if not because he suffered a huge setback after his agni kai? Imagine how much hard work, patience it was to build Zuko back up again, so he would not freeze in blind panic (or curl up in a ball) when fire gets close to his face. I think Iroh practiced this with him all the time until he could stand there unflinching (knowing that Iroh is in full control of his bending and trusting that his uncle would never hurt him). And when it came to the duel with Zhao, Zuko could react in a RL situation instead of freezing up, and turn all the negative feelings (rage, anger, pain, whatever) into fuel to win the fight against a bender who is much more skilled than he is.  And Iroh obviously drilled him with control and restraint, because no matter how much he lets his rage loose, he has enough control not to hurt Zhao and enough self-restraint not to burn him at the end. I definitely think it was a deliberate choice on Iroh’s part to hold back on teaching offensive forms to Zuko beyond the basics (knowing that combining those with his unprocessed anger could result in him being out of control and hurt people). Instead, it seems he concentrated on teaching him defensive forms, fire breath, heat control, and so on… What the FUCK iroh was the real mvp of this whole show my god Indeed. It goes over many people’s head, but he made a huge difference. It was mostly assists and defensive plays though, not the flashy stuff. I love that narrative so much, how you change the world one person at a time and not only violence and hate, but also love and kindness creates ripple effects. 
Definitely, Fire, and God: royaltealovingkookiness:
deeperthanswords:

royaltealovingkookiness:


The first training of Zuko we see, Iroh shoots a fireball right into Zuko’s face - while Zuko just stands there unflinching. It’s the very first episode, and Zuko & Iroh are the obvious villains, and it just seems like some macho bs they do.  And then comes the duel with Zhao, and Zuko is down, but when he sees that flaming fist to his face, something lets loose inside him that helps him turn the fight around…But it’s not until we learn Zuko’s backstory that all this gets a whole new meaning. 
Why would Zuko still be on basics if not because he suffered a huge setback after his agni kai? Imagine how much hard work, patience it was to build Zuko back up again, so he would not freeze in blind panic (or curl up in a ball) when fire gets close to his face. I think Iroh practiced this with him all the time until he could stand there unflinching (knowing that Iroh is in full control of his bending and trusting that his uncle would never hurt him). And when it came to the duel with Zhao, Zuko could react in a RL situation instead of freezing up, and turn all the negative feelings (rage, anger, pain, whatever) into fuel to win the fight against a bender who is much more skilled than he is. 
And Iroh obviously drilled him with control and restraint, because no matter how much he lets his rage loose, he has enough control not to hurt Zhao and enough self-restraint not to burn him at the end. I definitely think it was a deliberate choice on Iroh’s part to hold back on teaching offensive forms to Zuko beyond the basics (knowing that combining those with his unprocessed anger could result in him being out of control and hurt people). Instead, it seems he concentrated on teaching him defensive forms, fire breath, heat control, and so on…


What the FUCK iroh was the real mvp of this whole show my god

Indeed. It goes over many people’s head, but he made a huge difference. It was mostly assists and defensive plays though, not the flashy stuff.
I love that narrative so much, how you change the world one person at a time and not only violence and hate, but also love and kindness creates ripple effects. 

royaltealovingkookiness: deeperthanswords: royaltealovingkookiness: The first training of Zuko we see, Iroh shoots a fireball right into ...

Twins, How, and Olsen Twins: The Olsen twins look like one of them knows how you die and the other knows when you die.
Twins, How, and Olsen Twins: The Olsen twins look like one of them knows how you die and the other knows when you die.

The Olsen twins look like one of them knows how you die and the other knows when you die.

Beautiful, College, and Desperate: Carl Kinsella Follow @TVsCarlKinsella Reminder that the story of how Alan Alda met his wife Arlene is pure goals. "In 1956, while attending Fordham, he met Arlene Weiss, who attending Hunter College. They bonded at a mutual friend's dinner party; when a rum cake accidentally fell onto the kitchen floor, they were the only two guests who did not hesitate to eat was it." 5:04 AM-14 Sep 2017 1,114 Retweets 3,179 Likes jadedamber: mysharona1987: flootzavut: onekisstotakewithme: bbc03undercover: murielsweating: mysharona1987: They’re still together like 60 years later. This is a beautiful love story. I’m just looking for someone to eat garbage floor cake with. I love everything about this story. Alan Alda is my spirit animal (and quite possibly my patronus) That’s hilarious and adorable. “The hostess of the evening had made a rum cake, and she put it on the refrigerator to cool,” Alda recalled. “The refrigerator shook, and the cake fell off the refrigerator and hit the floor.” It was a party moment that separated the casual diners from those desperate for dessert. “Arlene and I were the only two people who went in with spoons and ate it off the floor,” he said with a smile. “That’s how you know. When two people eat a cake off the floor, that’s it for life.” There’s no arguing that point. In fact, Alda seems certain today’s daters could learn a thing or two from him and Arlene. “All this matchmaking on the Internet, and they ask them questions — just toss a cake on the floor and see who goes for it,” he suggested. this post single-handedly fixed my evening and cleared my pores.
Beautiful, College, and Desperate: Carl Kinsella
 Follow
 @TVsCarlKinsella
 Reminder that the story of how Alan Alda met
 his wife Arlene is pure goals.
 "In 1956, while attending Fordham, he met Arlene Weiss, who
 attending Hunter College. They bonded at a mutual friend's
 dinner party; when a rum cake accidentally fell onto the kitchen
 floor, they were the only two guests who did not hesitate to eat
 was
 it."
 5:04 AM-14 Sep 2017
 1,114 Retweets 3,179 Likes
jadedamber:
mysharona1987:

flootzavut:

onekisstotakewithme:


bbc03undercover:

murielsweating:


mysharona1987:

They’re still together like 60 years later.
This is a beautiful love story.


I’m just looking for someone to eat garbage floor cake with.


I love everything about this story.


Alan Alda is my spirit animal (and quite possibly my patronus)


That’s hilarious and adorable.

“The hostess of the evening had made a rum cake, and she put it on the refrigerator to cool,” Alda recalled. “The refrigerator shook, and the cake fell off the refrigerator and hit the floor.”
It was a party moment that separated the casual diners from those desperate for dessert.

“Arlene and I were the only two people who went in with spoons and ate it off the floor,” he said with a smile. “That’s how you know. When two people eat a cake off the floor, that’s it for life.”




There’s no arguing that point. In fact, Alda seems certain today’s daters could learn a thing or two from him and Arlene.




“All this matchmaking on the Internet, and they ask them questions — just toss a cake on the floor and see who goes for it,” he suggested.



this post single-handedly fixed my evening and cleared my pores.

jadedamber: mysharona1987: flootzavut: onekisstotakewithme: bbc03undercover: murielsweating: mysharona1987: They’re still together l...

Children, Clothes, and Fail: gaming: Indie Game Spotlight: Untitled Goose Game  Oh, boy, do we have an extra super horrible Indie Game Spotlight exclusive for you today! We’re talking, of course, of Untitled Goose Game, a slapstick simulator, where you play a goose hassling a town full of people who would very much like you to stop hassling them, please. It feels a bit like playing the videogame version of an old cartoon, complete with reactive soundtrack. Everything that happens in the game is very low stakes (the goose doesn’t get involved in political scandals, or drive a car off a ramp etc.), but there’s a lot of room for comedic performance in doing things like stealing clothes off a washing line and dumping them in a pond. The team at House House shares roles a lot, and so the game was predominantly designed collaboratively by four people. We chatted with Stuart Gillespie-Cook, who mostly works on animation. Also within House House is Jake Strasser, largely responsible for the design of levels and environments, Nico Disseldorp who does all the programming, and Michael McMaster who mostly works on art direction and UI. The iconic sound effects were made by Em Halberstadt, and Dan Golding designed the music. There’s also art from Kalonica Quigley and additional UI programming from Cherie Davidson. Stuart Gave us the lowdown on the curious title, the game mechanics, and dream crossovers. Read on! What’s the story behind the title of the game? This more or less happened by accident; at first, we just needed something to put on a video we were submitting to a festival. It’s become one of the best things about the game, and I’m so glad we stuck with it. I will say it’s a weird thing to explain when your very not-online hairdresser asks you “oh, what game are you working on?”  How did the team come up with the animation style? The whole visual style of the game is designed to be nice and clean, very readable and approachable. The animation specifically takes a lot of inspiration from slapstick and pantomime—with big, over the top reactions that are impossible to miss. We wanted to squeeze as much emotion as possible out of these people without facial expressions, so everything has to be evoked with body language. We also lean heavily on two dimensional, hand-drawn effects that are lifted from comics—lines to represent the direction of a honk, stars when someone hits their thumb with a hammer, etc. Untitled Goose Game offers a unique take on the puzzle genre. What other mechanics can we expect? Because it’s a game that’s largely about interacting with a bunch of people, the game borrows heavily from AI systems in stealth games. Playing with a character’s awareness of where the goose is, where they left their stuff, where that sound came from etc. is a big part of the comedy of the game. So, while it’s less restrictive than most stealth games, and there’s no real fail state (ie. if a character sees a goose, they’ll think “ah, there’s a goose” rather than “I’d better shoot and kill that spy”), those explicit behaviours that are so present in the stealth genre are really important in our goose game. If you could have the goose cross over into any cinematic or game universe, what would it be and why? It would be nice to see the goose chase Postman Pat over a hedgerow. That era of British children’s television has been a huge influence on the game. Otherwise, we’re always open to having the goose in Smash. Are you ready to fulfill your wildest dreams of becoming a mischevious goose and harassing people? Of course you are! Check out the website to find out how you can get your hands wings on Untitled Goose Game!
Children, Clothes, and Fail: gaming:
Indie Game Spotlight: Untitled Goose Game 
Oh, boy, do we have an extra super horrible Indie Game Spotlight exclusive for you today! We’re talking, of course, of Untitled Goose Game, a slapstick simulator, where you play a goose hassling a town full of people who would very much like you to stop hassling them, please. It feels a bit like playing the videogame version of an old cartoon, complete with reactive soundtrack. Everything that happens in the game is very low stakes (the goose doesn’t get involved in political scandals, or drive a car off a ramp etc.), but there’s a lot of room for comedic performance in doing things like stealing clothes off a washing line and dumping them in a pond.
The team at House House shares roles a lot, and so the game was predominantly designed collaboratively by four people. We chatted with Stuart Gillespie-Cook, who mostly works on animation. Also within House House is Jake Strasser, largely responsible for the design of levels and environments, Nico Disseldorp who does all the programming, and Michael McMaster who mostly works on art direction and UI. The iconic sound effects were made by Em Halberstadt, and Dan Golding designed the music. There’s also art from Kalonica Quigley and additional UI programming from Cherie Davidson. Stuart Gave us the lowdown on the curious title, the game mechanics, and dream crossovers. Read on!
What’s the story behind the title of the game?
This more or less happened by accident; at first, we just needed something to put on a video we were submitting to a festival. It’s become one of the best things about the game, and I’m so glad we stuck with it. I will say it’s a weird thing to explain when your very not-online hairdresser asks you “oh, what game are you working on?”  
How did the team come up with the animation style?
The whole visual style of the game is designed to be nice and clean, very readable and approachable. The animation specifically takes a lot of inspiration from slapstick and pantomime—with big, over the top reactions that are impossible to miss. We wanted to squeeze as much emotion as possible out of these people without facial expressions, so everything has to be evoked with body language. We also lean heavily on two dimensional, hand-drawn effects that are lifted from comics—lines to represent the direction of a honk, stars when someone hits their thumb with a hammer, etc.


Untitled Goose Game offers a unique take on the puzzle genre. What other mechanics can we expect?
Because it’s a game that’s largely about interacting with a bunch of people, the game borrows heavily from AI systems in stealth games. Playing with a character’s awareness of where the goose is, where they left their stuff, where that sound came from etc. is a big part of the comedy of the game. So, while it’s less restrictive than most stealth games, and there’s no real fail state (ie. if a character sees a goose, they’ll think “ah, there’s a goose” rather than “I’d better shoot and kill that spy”), those explicit behaviours that are so present in the stealth genre are really important in our goose game.
If you could have the goose cross over into any cinematic or game universe, what would it be and why?
It would be nice to see the goose chase Postman Pat over a hedgerow. That era of British children’s television has been a huge influence on the game. Otherwise, we’re always open to having the goose in Smash.
Are you ready to fulfill your wildest dreams of becoming a mischevious goose and harassing people? Of course you are! Check out the website to find out how you can get your hands wings on Untitled Goose Game!

gaming: Indie Game Spotlight: Untitled Goose Game  Oh, boy, do we have an extra super horrible Indie Game Spotlight exclusive for you today!...