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Advil, Food, and News: When should I take: acetaminophen vs. ibuprofen? While both acetaminophen and ibuprofen provide relief these popular pain medications treat different ailments. Find out which remedy is best for you and how to take it correctly IBUPROFEN (Advil or Motrin) ACETAMINOPHEN (Tylenol) Pain Relief Best for Best for Muscle aches and joint pain Headaches Inflammation and swelling Lowering fever Menstrual pain Possible Side Effects . Upset stomach . Skin rash and blisters Heartburn . Stomach pain Warning: Stop taking immediately if a rash occurs. Tip: Take with food to help prevent upset stomach and ulcers. Toxicity . Increased risk of . Potential liver damage heart attack or stroke e Potential kidney damage Caution Be cautious of taking cold medications if you've already taken pain medicine. Many cold medications also contain acetaminophen, which may appear abbreviated as "APAP or "Acetam." Other over-the-counter products like naproxen (Aleve) are in the same class as ibuprofen and should not be taken WARNING Do NOT take Do NOT take: If you drink more than 3 alcoholic drinks per day If you have stomach ulcers or are taking blood pressure medication From the expert Both acetaminophen and ibuprofen are helpful for pain relief and reducing fever. However, ibuprofen also helps reduce sweling, while acetaminophen is generally safer and rarely has side effects. Remember that although both medications are available over-the- counter, each still carries risks Only take on an a basis and be careful not to exceed the recommended daily maximum dosage - Marwah Desoky, lead pharmacist at Sharp Coronado www.sharp.com/news 2016 Sharp HealthCare. All rights reserved SHARP medicalbasics: pain relief #nursingschool #nurse #rn #nursing #nurses #nursingstudent #resources #study #inspiration #school #tips - http://bit.ly/2ByDqHG According to my pharmacist mother some studies have shown that taking ibuprofen or another NSAID such as Aleve and then taking Tylenol a few hours later has the same pain killing power of narcotics without the addictive factor. That’s the combo I use when my cramps are really acting up.
Advil, Food, and News: When should I take:
 acetaminophen
 vs.
 ibuprofen?
 While both acetaminophen and ibuprofen provide relief
 these popular pain medications treat different ailments. Find
 out which remedy is best for you and how to take it correctly
 IBUPROFEN
 (Advil or Motrin)
 ACETAMINOPHEN
 (Tylenol)
 Pain Relief
 Best for
 Best for
 Muscle aches
 and joint pain
 Headaches
 Inflammation
 and swelling
 Lowering fever
 Menstrual pain
 Possible Side Effects
 . Upset stomach
 . Skin rash and blisters
 Heartburn
 . Stomach pain
 Warning: Stop
 taking immediately
 if a rash occurs.
 Tip: Take with food
 to help prevent upset
 stomach and ulcers.
 Toxicity
 . Increased risk of
 . Potential liver damage
 heart attack or stroke
 e Potential kidney damage
 Caution
 Be cautious of taking cold
 medications if you've already
 taken pain medicine. Many
 cold medications also contain
 acetaminophen, which may
 appear abbreviated as "APAP
 or "Acetam."
 Other over-the-counter
 products like naproxen
 (Aleve) are in the same
 class as ibuprofen and
 should not be taken
 WARNING
 Do NOT take
 Do NOT take:
 If you drink more than 3
 alcoholic drinks per day
 If you have stomach
 ulcers or are taking
 blood pressure medication
 From the expert
 Both acetaminophen and ibuprofen are helpful
 for pain relief and reducing fever. However, ibuprofen
 also helps reduce sweling, while acetaminophen is
 generally safer and rarely has side effects. Remember
 that although both medications are available over-the-
 counter, each still carries risks Only take on an a
 basis and be careful not to exceed the recommended
 daily maximum dosage
 - Marwah Desoky, lead pharmacist at Sharp Coronado
 www.sharp.com/news
 2016 Sharp HealthCare. All rights reserved
 SHARP
medicalbasics:

pain relief #nursingschool #nurse #rn #nursing #nurses #nursingstudent #resources #study #inspiration #school #tips - http://bit.ly/2ByDqHG

According to my pharmacist mother some studies have shown that taking ibuprofen or another NSAID such as Aleve and then taking Tylenol a few hours later has the same pain killing power of narcotics without the addictive factor. That’s the combo I use when my cramps are really acting up.

medicalbasics: pain relief #nursingschool #nurse #rn #nursing #nurses #nursingstudent #resources #study #inspiration #school #tips - http:/...

Target, Tumblr, and Blog: robeblr: yung-penis: gif87a-com: Everyday he waits for his owner. im gonna hav a heart attack Do. It. For . Him.
Target, Tumblr, and Blog: robeblr:

yung-penis:

gif87a-com:

Everyday he waits for his owner.

im gonna hav a heart attack


Do. It. For . Him.

robeblr: yung-penis: gif87a-com: Everyday he waits for his owner. im gonna hav a heart attack Do. It. For . Him.

America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care: The infamous $629 bandaid Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US Just… facility fees Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis) Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x) People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely)
America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded
 SJPeace
 The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A
 first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat
 We need Universal Healthcare!
 RETWEET THIS
 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it.
 But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it.
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android
 1.9K Retweets
 3.6K Likes

 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it
 But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 down
 By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept
 trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was
 dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs
 of abating
 At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew
 had to go to the hospital
 I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different
 Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able
 to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost
 me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't
 qualify for Taiwanese NHI)

 My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to
 the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by
 an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given
 IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did
 an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or
 appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a
 particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis
 (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I
 began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and
 my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with
 a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication.
 Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am
 now pretty much back to normal
 The bill for the ER visit?
 US$80.00
 Eighty. American. Dollars
 Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance.
 At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan.
 And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that.
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money.
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
corvussy:
thatpettyblackgirl:


the US has no excuse


some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care:

The infamous $629 bandaid
Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section
Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill
Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD
Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills

A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices


Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices
Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise
Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US
Just… facility fees


Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis)
Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x)

People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely)

corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care:...

Alive, America, and Asian: did you know? Photographer Diana Kim, whose father abandoned her when she was 5, wanted to document the lives of the homeless. Searching for subjects on the streets, she came upon a thin and distant man in rags who looked somewhat familiar. It was her father. By fate or by chance, she'd found him after 25 years. PHOTO: DIANA KIM DIDYOUKNOWBLOG.COM did-you-kno: He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, medication, food, or new clothing. Eventually, he said to her: “Diana, I am so sorry for not being in your life. I am so happy that you have a family of your own now. Do better for them… … Don’t worry about me or what everyone says about me. If you want to make me proud and happy, be there for your family the way your mom and I never were. Stop trying to save everyone…just worry about yourself and your family. And don’t forget why I named you Diana, you are the light within the darkness.” So she refused to give up. After suffering a heart attack, he agreed to get help and slowly took control of his own life. One day he suddenly called her to invite her out for coffee. Later that afternoon, she wrote on her blog: “I feel like I just met my father for the first time today.” “I struggled to reconcile my feelings toward my father’s absence in my life, while continuing to care deeply for him and other homeless individuals.” “Over time, I learned to navigate through my feelings of desperation and became more vocal in my community about my father’s condition and what it’s like to watch a loved one battle mental illness.” He is now doing very well, and they are rebuilding their relationship from the ground up. “So long as we are alive in this world, every day is an opportunity to take hold of that ‘second chance.’ There is no failure unless you give up, and he never gave up. And I haven’t given up on him.” Source
Alive, America, and Asian: did you know?
 Photographer Diana Kim, whose
 father abandoned her when she
 was 5, wanted to document the
 lives of the homeless. Searching
 for subjects on the streets, she
 came upon a thin and distant man
 in rags who looked somewhat familiar.
 It was her father. By fate or by chance,
 she'd found him after 25 years.
 PHOTO: DIANA KIM
 DIDYOUKNOWBLOG.COM
did-you-kno:



He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, medication, food, or new clothing.


Eventually, he said to her: “Diana, I am so sorry for not being in your life. I am so happy that you have a family of your own now. Do better for them…
… Don’t worry about me or what everyone says about me. If you want to make me proud and happy, be there for your family the way your mom and I never were. Stop trying to save everyone…just worry about yourself and your family. And don’t forget why I named you Diana, you are the light within the darkness.” So she refused to give up.
After suffering a heart attack, he agreed to get help and slowly took control of his own life.
One day he suddenly called her to invite her out for coffee. Later that afternoon, she wrote on her blog: “I feel like I just met my father for the first time today.”
“I struggled to reconcile my feelings toward my father’s absence in my life, while continuing to care deeply for him and other homeless individuals.”
“Over time, I learned to navigate through my feelings of desperation and became more vocal in my community about my father’s condition and what it’s like to watch a loved one battle mental illness.”
He is now doing very well, and they are rebuilding their relationship from the ground up. “So long as we are alive in this world, every day is an opportunity to take hold of that ‘second chance.’ There is no failure unless you give up, and he never gave up. And I haven’t given up on him.”
Source

did-you-kno: He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, m...