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Animals, Beautiful, and Church: goosegoblin: theramseyloft: jurassicjenday: theramseyloft: tinysaurus-rex: iwilltrytobereasonable: cant-hug-every-human: thedeadofflandersfields: Pigeon steals poppies from the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australia in order to build a nest beside a stained glass window. @birdblogwhichisforbirds @snitling EXACTLY This is two pigeons, pigeons nest in bonded pairs (notice the first one is checked and its mate on the nest is barred). Usually they don’t make nests nearly so big but I guess if you have the materials, go for it. The nest is so unusually big because the vast majority is a platform to keep the actual nest (just that tiny ring in the corner around the bird sitting in it) cushioned from the anti bird spikes. This is a work of beautiful defiance. Using the very thing installed to make just a moment’s rest impossible as structural supports for an immovably stable nursery. The symbolism achieved by these pigeons is better than some writers can hope for and I love it! From the nest on the bird repellent spikes to the fact that those spikes are along the stained glass windows of a church, a place associated with sanctuary and compassion. The fact that the nest is made of stolen poppies for remembrance day hits the hardest though. Of the 54 animals to be awarded the Dickin Medal for acts of gallantry during WW2, 32 of them were pigeons. These were messengers who flew through battlefields and across borders, many of whom were killed or severely injured by enemy forces including gunfire and trained falcons. Many of their achievements saved the lives of hundreds of soldiers, and yet now their descendants are faces with anti-bird spikes, shooting and poisoning in an attempt to rid the cities from the rats with wings. I love this picture because it feels like they’re taking back just a little bit of that credit owed to them.  Reblogging for this beautiful addition. [ID: three colour photographs. The first shows a pigeon holding a fake poppy in its teeth, standing on a marble surface. The second shows a nest made of hundreds of fake poppies, cushioning a sitting pigeon from the anti-bird spikes below. The final photo is a zoomed-out picture of the nest, showing many stained glass windows surrounding it.]
Animals, Beautiful, and Church: goosegoblin:
theramseyloft:

jurassicjenday:


theramseyloft:

tinysaurus-rex:


iwilltrytobereasonable:

cant-hug-every-human:

thedeadofflandersfields:
Pigeon steals poppies from the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australia in order to build a nest beside a stained glass window.
@birdblogwhichisforbirds


@snitling EXACTLY


This is two pigeons, pigeons nest in bonded pairs (notice the first one is checked and its mate on the nest is barred). Usually they don’t make nests nearly so big but I guess if you have the materials, go for it. 


The nest is so unusually big because the vast majority is a platform to keep the actual nest (just that tiny ring in the corner around the bird sitting in it) cushioned from the anti bird spikes.
This is a work of beautiful defiance.
Using the very thing installed to make just a moment’s rest impossible as structural supports for an immovably stable nursery.

The symbolism achieved by these pigeons is better than some writers can hope for and I love it!
From the nest on the bird repellent spikes to the fact that those spikes are along the stained glass windows of a church, a place associated with sanctuary and compassion. The fact that the nest is made of stolen poppies for remembrance day hits the hardest though. Of the 54 animals to be awarded the Dickin Medal for acts of gallantry during WW2, 32 of them were pigeons. These were messengers who flew through battlefields and across borders, many of whom were killed or severely injured by enemy forces including gunfire and trained falcons. Many of their achievements saved the lives of hundreds of soldiers, and yet now their descendants are faces with anti-bird spikes, shooting and poisoning in an attempt to rid the cities from the rats with wings. I love this picture because it feels like they’re taking back just a little bit of that credit owed to them. 


Reblogging for this beautiful addition.

[ID: three colour photographs. The first shows a pigeon holding a fake poppy in its teeth, standing on a marble surface. The second shows a nest made of hundreds of fake poppies, cushioning a sitting pigeon from the anti-bird spikes below. The final photo is a zoomed-out picture of the nest, showing many stained glass windows surrounding it.]

goosegoblin: theramseyloft: jurassicjenday: theramseyloft: tinysaurus-rex: iwilltrytobereasonable: cant-hug-every-human: thedeadoffl...

Club, God, and Love: This legitimately upsets me. Y'see, now, y'see, I'm looking at this, thinking, squares fit together better than circles, so, say, if you wanted a box of donuts, a full box, you could probably fit more square donuts in than circle donuts if the circumference of the circle touched the each of the comers of the square donut. So you might end up with more donuts. But then I also think... Does the square or round donut have a greater donut volume? Is the number of donuts better than the entire donut mass as a whole? Hrm. HRM. A round donut with radius R1 occupies the same space as a square donut with side 2R1. If the center circle of a round donut has a radius R2 and the hole ofa square donut has a side 2R2, then the area of a round donut is nR12 nr22. The area of a square donut would be then 4R12 4R22. This doesn't say much, but in general and throwing numbers, a full box of square donuts has more donut per donut than a full box of round donuts. The interesting thing is knowing exactly how much more donut per donut we have. Assuming first a small center hole (R2 R1/4) and replacing in the proper expressions, we have a 27,6% more donut in the square one (Round: 15nR12/16 2,94R12, square: 15R12/4 3,75R12). Now, assuming a large center hole (R2 3R1/4 ) we have a 27,7 % more donut in the square one (Round: 7nR12/16 1,37R12, square: 7R12/4 1,75R12). This tells us that, approximately, well have a 27% bigger donut if it's square than if it's round. ddr: Square donuts have a 27 % more donut per donut in the same space as a round one. god i love this site laughoutloud-club: Who doesn’t love 27% more donut
Club, God, and Love: This legitimately upsets me.
 Y'see, now, y'see, I'm looking at this, thinking, squares fit
 together better than circles, so, say, if you wanted a box of donuts,
 a full box, you could probably fit more square donuts in than circle
 donuts if the circumference of the circle touched the each of the
 comers of the square donut.
 So you might end up with more donuts.
 But then I also think... Does the square or round donut have a
 greater donut volume? Is the number of donuts better than the
 entire donut mass as a whole?
 Hrm.
 HRM.
 A round donut with radius R1 occupies the same space as a square
 donut with side 2R1. If the center circle of a round donut has a radius
 R2 and the hole ofa square donut has a side 2R2, then the area of a
 round donut is nR12 nr22. The area of a square donut would be then
 4R12 4R22. This doesn't say much, but in general and throwing
 numbers, a full box of square donuts has more donut per donut than a
 full box of round donuts.
 The interesting thing is knowing exactly how much more donut per
 donut we have. Assuming first a small center hole (R2 R1/4) and
 replacing in the proper expressions, we have a 27,6% more donut in
 the square one (Round: 15nR12/16 2,94R12, square: 15R12/4
 3,75R12). Now, assuming a large center hole (R2 3R1/4 ) we have a
 27,7 % more donut in the square one (Round: 7nR12/16 1,37R12,
 square: 7R12/4 1,75R12). This tells us that, approximately, well
 have a 27% bigger donut if it's square than if it's round.
 ddr: Square donuts have a 27 % more donut per donut in the same
 space as a round one.
 god i love this site
laughoutloud-club:

Who doesn’t love 27% more donut

laughoutloud-club: Who doesn’t love 27% more donut

Books, Children, and Community: Only start creating a lore after you already finished half of the series and keep adding stuff a decade after finishing it Steal 90% of your deep lore from real life history and other authors to fill out your world map Create an entire universe with a bloody, theological history with hundreds of characters and dozens of devastating wars, then write a childrens book in it aethelflaedladyofmercia: Ok like I think people are forgetting something very important about JKR.Namely, she did not make up this stuff after the fact. Back in the day, JKR was extremely open about the fact that there was tons of lore behind the scenes she could not address in the books. She couldn’t address it, btw, because it was a known fact in the publishing industry that young adult novels had to top out at like 250, maybe 300 pages because kids didn’t have the attention span for anything longer. And early HP was middle grade, which is the next age category down. She was only able to start addressing deeper lore halfway through the series because that’s how long it took to convince her publishers it wouldn’t scare readers away.(I distinctly remember another, long-established children’s fantasy author dedicating a book to JKR because the success of HP was the reason said author was able to negotiate an extra 100 pages into that novel.)In the mean time, she was in a ton of interviews. She was absolutely the most open author about her worldbuilding. If a fan asked her a question and the answer wasn’t a spoiler, she answered it every time. JKR was famous for this. She was worshipped for it practically. I remember on the early internet boards, when one fan had the chance to meet her in a Q&A we would all pile together and come up with as many questions as possible. Ask what year Beauxbatons was founded. Ask who the ghost of Hufflepuff is. Ask McGonagall’s age. Ask Lily’s maiden name. Were all the Marauders in Gryffindor? Which of Gilderoy Lockheart’s stories were stolen and which were flat out made up?We collected these interviews, we held them as canon, we altered our fanfic to accommodate what she revealed. And then, all of a sudden, that wasn’t what the fans wanted any more. When she finished HP, she said she was done, that she’d move on to other projects. No one wanted any of her non-HP stuff. No one cared. So she came back to build the Fantastic Beasts verse, with exactly the same policy about answering fans that we had welcomed back in the early 2000s.So, like, you don’t have to enjoy what she’s doing. The fan community has changed, and that’s fine. But JKR contributed a lot to the children’s fantasy genre and to the way fandom operated, and we should at least acknowledge that.
Books, Children, and Community: Only start creating a lore after
 you already finished half of the
 series and keep adding stuff a
 decade after finishing it
 Steal 90% of your deep lore from
 real life history and other authors
 to fill out your world map
 Create an entire universe with a
 bloody, theological history with
 hundreds of characters and dozens
 of devastating wars, then write a
 childrens book in it
aethelflaedladyofmercia:

Ok like I think people are forgetting something very important about JKR.Namely, she did not make up this stuff after the fact. Back in the day, JKR was extremely open about the fact that there was tons of lore behind the scenes she could not address in the books. She couldn’t address it, btw, because it was a known fact in the publishing industry that young adult novels had to top out at like 250, maybe 300 pages because kids didn’t have the attention span for anything longer. And early HP was middle grade, which is the next age category down. She was only able to start addressing deeper lore halfway through the series because that’s how long it took to convince her publishers it wouldn’t scare readers away.(I distinctly remember another, long-established children’s fantasy author dedicating a book to JKR because the success of HP was the reason said author was able to negotiate an extra 100 pages into that novel.)In the mean time, she was in a ton of interviews. She was absolutely the most open author about her worldbuilding. If a fan asked her a question and the answer wasn’t a spoiler, she answered it every time. JKR was famous for this. She was worshipped for it practically. I remember on the early internet boards, when one fan had the chance to meet her in a Q&A we would all pile together and come up with as many questions as possible. Ask what year Beauxbatons was founded. Ask who the ghost of Hufflepuff is. Ask McGonagall’s age. Ask Lily’s maiden name. Were all the Marauders in Gryffindor? Which of Gilderoy Lockheart’s stories were stolen and which were flat out made up?We collected these interviews, we held them as canon, we altered our fanfic to accommodate what she revealed. And then, all of a sudden, that wasn’t what the fans wanted any more. When she finished HP, she said she was done, that she’d move on to other projects. No one wanted any of her non-HP stuff. No one cared. So she came back to build the Fantastic Beasts verse, with exactly the same policy about answering fans that we had welcomed back in the early 2000s.So, like, you don’t have to enjoy what she’s doing. The fan community has changed, and that’s fine. But JKR contributed a lot to the children’s fantasy genre and to the way fandom operated, and we should at least acknowledge that.

aethelflaedladyofmercia: Ok like I think people are forgetting something very important about JKR.Namely, she did not make up this stuff af...