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Birthday, Facebook, and Life: HAPPY BIRTHDAY QUEEN LILI'UOKALANI! profeminist: “Happy Birthday Queen Lili'uokalani! The last sovereign of the Kalākaua dynasty, Queen Lili'uokalani was the first woman to ever rule Hawaii. She organized schools for Hawaii’s youth and composed over 160 songs. Her work “Aloha Oe” eventually became Hawaii’s national anthem.”   - Alice Paul Institute  “Liliʻuokalani ascended to the throne on January 29, 1891, nine days after her brother’s death. During her reign, she attempted to draft a new constitution which would restore the power of the monarchy and the voting rights of the economically disenfranchised. Threatened by her attempts to abrogate the Bayonet Constitution, pro-American elements in Hawaiʻi overthrew the monarchy on January 17, 1893. The overthrow was bolstered by the landing of US Marines under John L. Stevens to protect American interests, which rendered the monarchy unable to protect itself. The coup d'état established the Republic of Hawaiʻi, but the ultimate goal was the annexation of the islands to the United States, which was temporarily blocked by President Grover Cleveland. After an unsuccessful uprising to restore the monarchy, the oligarchical government placed the former queen under house arrest at the ʻIolani Palace. On January 24, 1895, Liliʻuokalani was forced to abdicate the Hawaiian throne, officially ending the deposed monarchy. Attempts were made to restore the monarchy and oppose annexation, but with the outbreak of the Spanish–American War, the United States annexed Hawaiʻi. Living out the remainder of her later life as a private citizen, Liliʻuokalani died at her residence, Washington Place, in Honolulu on November 11, 1917.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lili%CA%BBuokalani
Birthday, Facebook, and Life: HAPPY BIRTHDAY
 QUEEN LILI'UOKALANI!
profeminist:
“Happy Birthday Queen Lili'uokalani! The last sovereign of the Kalākaua dynasty, Queen Lili'uokalani was the first woman to ever rule Hawaii. She organized schools for Hawaii’s youth and composed over 160 songs. Her work “Aloha Oe” eventually became Hawaii’s national anthem.” 


 - Alice Paul Institute 
“Liliʻuokalani ascended to the throne on January 29, 1891, nine days after her brother’s death. During her reign, she attempted to draft a new constitution which would restore the power of the monarchy and the voting rights of the economically disenfranchised. Threatened by her attempts to abrogate the Bayonet Constitution, pro-American elements in Hawaiʻi overthrew the monarchy on January 17, 1893. The overthrow was bolstered by the landing of US Marines under John L. Stevens to protect American interests, which rendered the monarchy unable to protect itself.
The coup d'état established the Republic of Hawaiʻi, but the ultimate goal was the annexation of the islands to the United States, which was temporarily blocked by President Grover Cleveland. After an unsuccessful uprising to restore the monarchy, the oligarchical government placed the former queen under house arrest at the ʻIolani Palace. On January 24, 1895, Liliʻuokalani was forced to abdicate the Hawaiian throne, officially ending the deposed monarchy. Attempts were made to restore the monarchy and oppose annexation, but with the outbreak of the Spanish–American War, the United States annexed Hawaiʻi. Living out the remainder of her later life as a private citizen, Liliʻuokalani died at her residence, Washington Place, in Honolulu on November 11, 1917.”
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lili%CA%BBuokalani

profeminist: “Happy Birthday Queen Lili'uokalani! The last sovereign of the Kalākaua dynasty, Queen Lili'uokalani was the first woman to eve...

Apple, Facebook, and Football: tibets Reporter wears grape costume to defend boy suspended for banana suit captain-price-official: shatterstag: gaymergirls: basedheisenberg: Real recognizes real. I finally got curious and decided to google this story, and the headline is just the tip of the iceberg.  Let it never be said again that journalism is a humorless business. Covering an odd tale about a 14-year-old autistic boy who was handcuffed by police and suspended for running down the sidelines of a high school football game at halftime wearing a banana costume, Washington, D.C. reporter Pat Collins donned a grape suit and went out to get his story. Speaking to Bryan Thompson, who pulled the prank on Sept. 14 and found himself at the center of a controversy over the school’s response, Collins’ sarcastic outrage seemed palpable. “School officials accused him of being disruptive and disrespectful,” Collins said. “Frankly, I don’t see what all the fuss is about.” He asked the student: “Why a banana? Why not a … grape?” “I don’t know,” Thompson replied. “Potassium is great.” Following the prank, Colonial Forge High School Principal Karen Spillman suspended Thompson for 10 days, and even recommended that he be kicked out of school for the entire year. Shortly thereafter, Thompson had composed his own rap song about the incident (called “Free Banana Man!”), set up a Facebook page dedicated to “Banana Man,” and someone even launched a petition calling for his suspension to be lifted. Thompson’s outrage at the punishment was shared by his fellow students, who began creating yellow t-shirts that read, “Free Banana Man!” So the school did what schools so often do when their authority is challenged: they banned the shirts, began confiscating them, and sent students to detention for supporting their classmate. That’s when the American Civil Liberties Union got involved, telling the principal that her actions were unconstitutional. “But when you think about it, you might see [the school’s] point,” Collins jokingly concluded. “It starts with a banana. Then, all of the sudden, you have an apple, and an orange, and maybe a grape! And before you know it, you have fruit salad in the schools! We can’t have that.” The school’s principal was ultimately forced to resign, and Thompson has since returned to his studies. [x] NICE “I don’t know,” Thompson replied. “Potassium is great.”
Apple, Facebook, and Football: tibets
 Reporter wears grape costume to defend
 boy suspended for banana suit
captain-price-official:

shatterstag:

gaymergirls:

basedheisenberg:

Real recognizes real.


I finally got curious and decided to google this story, and the headline is just the tip of the iceberg. 

Let it never be said again that journalism is a humorless business.
Covering an odd tale about a 14-year-old autistic boy who was handcuffed by police and suspended for running down the sidelines of a high school football game at halftime wearing a banana costume, Washington, D.C. reporter Pat Collins donned a grape suit and went out to get his story.
Speaking to Bryan Thompson, who pulled the prank on Sept. 14 and found himself at the center of a controversy over the school’s response, Collins’ sarcastic outrage seemed palpable.
“School officials accused him of being disruptive and disrespectful,” Collins said. “Frankly, I don’t see what all the fuss is about.”
He asked the student: “Why a banana? Why not a … grape?”
“I don’t know,” Thompson replied. “Potassium is great.”
Following the prank, Colonial Forge High School Principal Karen Spillman suspended Thompson for 10 days, and even recommended that he be kicked out of school for the entire year.
Shortly thereafter, Thompson had composed his own rap song about the incident (called “Free Banana Man!”), set up a Facebook page dedicated to “Banana Man,” and someone even launched a petition calling for his suspension to be lifted.
Thompson’s outrage at the punishment was shared by his fellow students, who began creating yellow t-shirts that read, “Free Banana Man!”
So the school did what schools so often do when their authority is challenged: they banned the shirts, began confiscating them, and sent students to detention for supporting their classmate.
That’s when the American Civil Liberties Union got involved, telling the principal that her actions were unconstitutional.
“But when you think about it, you might see [the school’s] point,” Collins jokingly concluded. “It starts with a banana. Then, all of the sudden, you have an apple, and an orange, and maybe a grape! And before you know it, you have fruit salad in the schools! We can’t have that.”
The school’s principal was ultimately forced to resign, and Thompson has since returned to his studies. [x]


NICE



“I don’t know,” Thompson replied. “Potassium is great.”

captain-price-official: shatterstag: gaymergirls: basedheisenberg: Real recognizes real. I finally got curious and decided to google t...

Dad, Hungry, and Scholar: dragonpuppies Elizabethan Peasant 1: Look yonder! Someone has writ upon that ceiling that thou art most easily gulled! Elizabethan Peasant 2: More fool they, for I cannot read Elizabethan Peasant 1: sighing, lowers his visage unto his palm* amityravenclawelf Elizabethan Peasant 1: Lo, hast thou learned to read? Elizabethan Peasant 2: Verily, and to compose as well Elizabethan Peasant 1: With haste, then, how is the word "i cup" composed? hi-def-doritos Elizabethan Peasant 1: what ho, I know a sporting jest! What art thou when thou art a peasant and art occupied in a privy? Elizabethan Peasant 2: I wist not, but certain am I that thou shalt tell me speedily. Elizabethan Peasant 1: Most verily, thou art a peon. little-niggah-sugar Elizabethan Child: Father, I have not yet broken fast and am filled with pangs of hunger Elizabethan Father: Hail, Filled With Pangs Of Hunger! Mine own name is Wybert marzipanandminutiae Elizabethan Scholar 1: Alack, I have in my purse but sixty-nine pence Elizabethan Scholar 2: Lusty fellow, knowst thou well what such a sum portends! Elizabethan Scholar 1 .I have not sufficient to sup on fowl ur-friendly-local-memer Elizabethan Scholar 1: Mine name is verily Micheal with a 'b', and I hast been afraid of insects mine entire Elizabethan Scholar 2: Cease cease cease. Wither is the bee? Elizabethan Scholar 1: Thither is a bee? vampyrewhore Mine outspoke companion: how many Appels art havested from a tree? Me: I know not, may it be twice a score? My companion: Nay fool, every Appel grows upona harvest sprig! Me: Frederich, upon the heavens I will strike thee down, for thy scalding wit is naught to my mighty brawn Source: dragonpuppies 86,585 notes Hi hungry, Im Dad
Dad, Hungry, and Scholar: dragonpuppies
 Elizabethan Peasant 1: Look yonder! Someone
 has writ upon that ceiling that thou art
 most easily gulled!
 Elizabethan Peasant 2: More fool they, for
 I cannot read
 Elizabethan Peasant 1: sighing, lowers his
 visage unto his palm*
 amityravenclawelf
 Elizabethan Peasant 1: Lo, hast thou learned to read?
 Elizabethan Peasant 2: Verily, and to compose as
 well
 Elizabethan Peasant 1: With haste, then, how is the
 word "i cup" composed?
 hi-def-doritos
 Elizabethan Peasant 1: what ho, I know a
 sporting jest! What art thou when thou art
 a peasant and art occupied in a privy?
 Elizabethan Peasant 2: I wist not, but
 certain am I that thou shalt tell me
 speedily.
 Elizabethan Peasant 1: Most verily, thou
 art a peon.
 little-niggah-sugar
 Elizabethan Child: Father, I have not yet broken fast
 and am filled with pangs of hunger
 Elizabethan Father: Hail, Filled With Pangs Of
 Hunger! Mine own name is Wybert
 marzipanandminutiae
 Elizabethan Scholar 1: Alack, I have in my purse but
 sixty-nine pence
 Elizabethan Scholar 2: Lusty fellow, knowst thou well
 what such a sum portends!
 Elizabethan Scholar 1 .I have not sufficient to sup
 on fowl
 ur-friendly-local-memer
 Elizabethan Scholar 1: Mine name is verily Micheal
 with a 'b', and I hast been afraid of insects mine entire
 Elizabethan Scholar 2: Cease cease cease. Wither is
 the bee?
 Elizabethan Scholar 1: Thither is a bee?
 vampyrewhore
 Mine outspoke companion: how many Appels art
 havested from a tree?
 Me: I know not, may it be twice a score?
 My companion: Nay fool, every Appel grows upona
 harvest sprig!
 Me: Frederich, upon the heavens I will strike thee
 down, for thy scalding wit is naught to my mighty
 brawn
 Source: dragonpuppies
 86,585 notes
Hi hungry, Im Dad

Hi hungry, Im Dad