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Fail, Friends, and Fucking: So our local children's hospital re- cently redecorated, but I'm not too sure they really thought things out tygermama: bundibird: tabbystardust: yeahhiyellow: madisactuallyscreeching: wildhaunt: cazador-red: eternal-dannation: jhenne-bean: forlovefromfear: diasporanpapi: youthful-pills: ichigo-hiyoko: mintymaiden: gildatheplant: Literally any other colour would’ve been a better choice guys. I’d like to point out that the colour red has more positive than negative meanings. im sorry but this reply absolutely killed me red can mean whatever the heck you want it to mean, that is never going to change that this straight up looks like they DRAGGED A BLOODY BODY ACROSS THE FUCKING FLOOR 😂 Hi fun fact, colors do have meaning and there is a legit thing called color theory. Red does has more positive connotations than negative like the @mintymaiden said. Red is associated with more love, lust, passion than blood and death just like the chart shows you but If you want, here’s a link for you to check it out yourself. Also, check out “The Designer’s Dictionary of Color” by Sean Adams. Have fun learning something Xoxo -Designer What is Color Theory? I think y’all are missing the point here. You can theorize to Nebraska and back but that doesn’t change my immediate reaction which is that someone is literally dragging a corpse around I like that the presumption here is that “No One On Tumblr Has Heard of Color Theory, Let Me Explain in Depth” rather than simply acknowledging that the VISUAL EFFECTS of this particular color choice, applied in the manner it was, can still amount to “this is a hospital and that looks like blood” like, color theory doesn’t exist in a vacuum. If your design of choice for Blood Red Paint is asymmetric splatters and sploches against the wall, or in this case, a snail trail on the hallway’s floor, an infographic won’t override the viewers’ instinct. this post is the perfect summation of tumblr’s reading comprehension and critical thought abilities Homicide detectives: why are you dragging that bleeding corpse around? Me, an intellectual: well you see it’s basic color theory… @yeahhiyellow I found it. The post. I’ve wanted to show you. Fuck color theory. Omg this is the best post ever 😂 It looks like blood? No it’s cOlOr THeOry Fun fact: if you fail to see how literally anyone looking at this will think “oh no someone dragged a body across the floor”, and instead go on and on about ~color theory~ you are an incompetent designer. Like, literally any designer worth their salt should have looked at the mock-up of this and said “hm,” and then decided “ok maybe let’s keep all the positive elements of Colour Theory red but maybe change the pattern.” Literally anything would have worked. Over-sized footprints. Smiley faces. Arrows. Crawling ivy. Polka dots. Stars. Anything except a blood trail. Yes, theyook like blood trails And I am convinced that the kids in that hospital play “drag the body” with their friends because it would be hilarious
Fail, Friends, and Fucking: So our local children's hospital re-
 cently redecorated, but I'm not too
 sure they really thought things out
tygermama:

bundibird:

tabbystardust:

yeahhiyellow:

madisactuallyscreeching:


wildhaunt:

cazador-red:

eternal-dannation:

jhenne-bean:

forlovefromfear:

diasporanpapi:


youthful-pills:


ichigo-hiyoko:

mintymaiden:

gildatheplant:
Literally any other colour would’ve been a better choice guys.

I’d like to point out that the colour red has more positive than negative meanings.

im sorry but this reply absolutely killed me
red can mean whatever the heck you want it to mean, that is never going to change that this straight up looks like they DRAGGED A BLOODY BODY ACROSS THE FUCKING FLOOR 😂


Hi fun fact, colors do have meaning and there is a legit thing called color theory. Red does has more positive connotations than negative like the @mintymaiden said. Red is associated with more love, lust, passion than blood and death just like the chart shows you but If you want, here’s a link for you to check it out yourself. Also, check out “The Designer’s Dictionary of Color” by Sean Adams. Have fun learning something

Xoxo 

-Designer 
What is Color Theory?


I think y’all are missing the point here.


You can theorize to Nebraska and back but that doesn’t change my immediate reaction which is that someone is literally dragging a corpse around

I like that the presumption here is that “No One On Tumblr Has Heard of Color Theory, Let Me Explain in Depth” rather than simply acknowledging that the VISUAL EFFECTS of this particular color choice, applied in the manner it was, can still amount to “this is a hospital and that looks like blood” 
like, color theory doesn’t exist in a vacuum. If your design of choice for Blood Red Paint is asymmetric splatters and sploches against the wall, or in this case, a snail trail on the hallway’s floor, an infographic won’t override the viewers’ instinct. 

this post is the perfect summation of tumblr’s reading comprehension and critical thought abilities




Homicide detectives: why are you dragging that bleeding corpse around?
Me, an intellectual: well you see it’s basic color theory…


@yeahhiyellow I found it. The post. I’ve wanted to show you.  Fuck color theory.


Omg this is the best post ever 😂
It looks like blood? No it’s cOlOr THeOry

Fun fact: if you fail to see how literally anyone looking at this will think “oh no someone dragged a body across the floor”, and instead go on and on about ~color theory~ you are an incompetent designer. 


Like, literally any designer worth their salt should have looked at the mock-up of this and said “hm,” and then decided “ok maybe let’s keep all the positive elements of Colour Theory red but maybe change the pattern.” Literally anything would have worked.  Over-sized footprints. Smiley faces. Arrows. Crawling ivy. Polka dots. Stars. Anything except a blood trail. 


Yes, theyook like blood trails
And I am convinced that the kids in that hospital play “drag the body” with their friends because it would be hilarious

tygermama: bundibird: tabbystardust: yeahhiyellow: madisactuallyscreeching: wildhaunt: cazador-red: eternal-dannation: jhenne-bean:...

Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d My children will get "privacy" from me when they can pay their own bills and feed themselves. Until then, you do what I say Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends. t 394 687 1,171 Mermaid Hofessional @StarStuffSister Replying to @TheTrillAC I haven't spoken to my mother in ten years. Welcome to your future. 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android marzipanandminutiae: greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. meanwhile, my parents… password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission regularly checked our internet browsing history shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them. your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights. nothing in this world teaches you to lie and sneak around like a parent who doesn’t believe you should have privacy
Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d
 My children will get "privacy" from me
 when they can pay their own bills and
 feed themselves. Until then, you do what I
 say
 Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends.
 t 394
 687
 1,171
 Mermaid Hofessional
 @StarStuffSister
 Replying to @TheTrillAC
 I haven't spoken to my mother in
 ten years.
 Welcome to your future.
 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android
marzipanandminutiae:

greysonderulo:
dragonsspire:


knight-nick:
If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. 
Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. 
I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. 
As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. 
I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation  we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. 
I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. 


meanwhile, my parents…
password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it
put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission
regularly checked our internet browsing history
shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework
did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities
in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them.
your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights.

nothing in this world teaches you to lie and sneak around like a parent who doesn’t believe you should have privacy

marzipanandminutiae: greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my paren...

Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d My children will get "privacy" from me when they can pay their own bills and feed themselves. Until then, you do what I say Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends. t 394 687 1,171 Mermaid Hofessional @StarStuffSister Replying to @TheTrillAC I haven't spoken to my mother in ten years. Welcome to your future. 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. meanwhile, my parents… password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission regularly checked our internet browsing history shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them. your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights.
Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d
 My children will get "privacy" from me
 when they can pay their own bills and
 feed themselves. Until then, you do what I
 say
 Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends.
 t 394
 687
 1,171
 Mermaid Hofessional
 @StarStuffSister
 Replying to @TheTrillAC
 I haven't spoken to my mother in
 ten years.
 Welcome to your future.
 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android
greysonderulo:
dragonsspire:


knight-nick:
If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. 
Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. 
I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. 
As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. 
I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation  we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. 
I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. 


meanwhile, my parents…
password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it
put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission
regularly checked our internet browsing history
shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework
did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities
in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them.
your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights.

greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my parents installed a lock on...

Memes, Millennials, and Condescending: Hey guys, I've been seeing these memes where muscular men at laptops explain elementary concepts in some topic or other to a nerdy-looking, curious kid. They really make me laugh, but I can't quite put my finger on why. It's not like there's any real jokes in there or anything First of all, I think this format makes excellent use of a comedic technique called incongruity, whereby viewers' preconceived notions are upended by unexpected juxtapositions. In this case, many people don't think of musclebound, traditionally masculine men as kind, intelligent and eager to advise. While not a joke in any conventional sense, this produces a humorous effect King, I want to echo what you're saying and also suggest that there's an even broader employment of incongruity here.. Viewers expect earnest requests for basic information to be met with vitriol due to a sense that discourse on web forums is generally noxious. The conviviality of the buff men's responses runs totally counter to viewer's expectations. It's not just muscular men that we presume to be hotheaded and condescending this kind of unacceptable behavior is endemic to the medium as a whole, and viewers are tickled to see that dynamic inverted. I really think Chief hit on something with that last response, and I want to add that part of the appeal of the format lies in its warmth those of us who spend a lot of time online find ourselves bathing in a sea of toxic discourse but, for a cohort so frequently described as overwhelmingly self-absorbed, I think that the millennials making and consuming these genuinely value humility a lack of ego and self-importance and empathy the ability to understand others. The men in these memes display these in spades and, through the experience of incogruity, viewers are given theopportunity to deepen their own humility and extend their sense of empathy. Here you go
Memes, Millennials, and Condescending: Hey guys, I've been seeing these memes
 where muscular men at laptops explain
 elementary concepts in some topic or other
 to a nerdy-looking, curious kid. They really
 make me laugh, but I can't quite put my
 finger on why. It's not like there's any real
 jokes in there or anything
 First of all, I think this format makes excellent
 use of a comedic technique called incongruity,
 whereby viewers' preconceived notions are
 upended by unexpected juxtapositions. In this
 case, many people don't think of musclebound,
 traditionally masculine men as kind, intelligent
 and eager to advise. While not a joke in any
 conventional sense, this produces a humorous
 effect
 King, I want to echo what you're saying and
 also suggest that there's an even broader
 employment of incongruity here.. Viewers
 expect earnest requests for basic information
 to be met with vitriol due to a sense that
 discourse on web forums is generally noxious.
 The conviviality of the buff men's responses
 runs totally counter to viewer's expectations.
 It's not just muscular men that we presume to
 be hotheaded and condescending this kind
 of unacceptable behavior is endemic to the
 medium as a whole, and viewers are tickled to
 see that dynamic inverted.
 I really think Chief hit on something with that
 last response, and I want to add that part of
 the appeal of the format lies in its warmth
 those of us who spend a lot of time online find
 ourselves bathing in a sea of toxic discourse
 but, for a cohort so frequently described as
 overwhelmingly self-absorbed, I think that the
 millennials making and consuming these
 genuinely value humility a lack of ego and
 self-importance and empathy the ability
 to understand others. The men in these
 memes display these in spades and, through
 the experience of incogruity, viewers are given
 theopportunity to deepen their own humility
 and extend their sense of empathy.
Here you go

Here you go

Beautiful, Community, and God: 21 Answers votes oldest newest You can't parse [X]HTML with regex. Because HTML can't be parsed by regex. Regex is not a tool that can be used to correctly parse HTML. As I have answered in HTML-and-regex questions here so many times before, the use of regex will not allow you to consume HTML. Regular expressions are a tool that is insufficiently sophisticated to understand the constructs employed by HTML. HTML is not a regular language and hence cannot be parsed by regular expressions. Regex queries are not equipped to break down HTML into its meaningful parts. so many times but it is not getting to me. Even enhanced irregular regular expressions as used by Perl are not up to the task of parsing HTML. You will never make me crack. HTML is a language of sufficient complexity that it cannot be parsed by regular expressions. Even Jon Skeet cannot parse HTML using regular expressions. Every time you attempt to parse HTML with regular expressions, the unholy child weeps the blood of virgins, and Russian hackers pwn your webapp. Parsing HTML with regex summons tainted souls into the realm of the living. HTML and regex go together like love, marriage, and ritual infanticide. The <center> cannot hold it is too late. The force of regex and HTML together in the same conceptual space will destroy your mind like so much watery putty. If you parse HTML with regex you are giving in to Them and their blasphemous ways which doom us all to inhuman toil for the One whose Name cannot be expressed in the Basic Multilingual Plane, he comes. HTML-plus-regexp will liquify the nerves of the sentient whilst you observe, your psyche withering in the onslaught of horror. Regex-based HTML parsers are the cancer that is killing StackOverflow it is too late it is too late we cannot be saved the trangession of a child ensures regex will consume all living tissue (except for HTML which it cannot, as previously prophesied) dear lord help us how can anyone survive this scourge using regex to parse HTML has doomed humanity to an eternity of dread torture and security holes using regex as a tool to process HTML establishes a breach between this world and the dread realm of čorrupt entities (like SGML entities, but more corrupt) a mere glimpse of the world of reg ex parsers for HTML will instantly transport a programmer's consciousness into a world of ceaseless screaming, he comes-the pestilent slithy regex-infection will devour your HTML parser, application and existence for all time like Vişual Basic only worse he comes he comes do not fight he comes, his uņholy radiance destroping all enlightenment, HTML tags leaking frọm your eyesiike liquid pain, the song of regular expression parsing-will extinguish the voices of mortal man from the sphere I can see it can you see t it is beautiful the f inal snuf fing of the lies of Man ALL ĮS LOSTALL IS LOST the pony he comes he comes hejcemes the ichor permeates al MY FACEFACEh god no NO NOOoo Ne stop the an ges aře not reâj ZALGO IS TON THË PONY, HECOMES 1811 Have you tried using an XML parser instead? link edit flag edited Nov 14 at 0:18 community wiki bobince regex and html
Beautiful, Community, and God: 21 Answers
 votes
 oldest
 newest
 You can't parse [X]HTML with regex. Because HTML can't be parsed by regex. Regex is not a tool that
 can be used to correctly parse HTML. As I have answered in HTML-and-regex questions here so many
 times before, the use of regex will not allow you to consume HTML. Regular expressions are a tool that is
 insufficiently sophisticated to understand the constructs employed by HTML. HTML is not a regular
 language and hence cannot be parsed by regular expressions. Regex queries are not equipped to break
 down HTML into its meaningful parts. so many times but it is not getting to me. Even enhanced irregular
 regular expressions as used by Perl are not up to the task of parsing HTML. You will never make me
 crack. HTML is a language of sufficient complexity that it cannot be parsed by regular expressions. Even
 Jon Skeet cannot parse HTML using regular expressions. Every time you attempt to parse HTML with
 regular expressions, the unholy child weeps the blood of virgins, and Russian hackers pwn your webapp.
 Parsing HTML with regex summons tainted souls into the realm of the living. HTML and regex go together
 like love, marriage, and ritual infanticide. The <center> cannot hold it is too late. The force of regex and
 HTML together in the same conceptual space will destroy your mind like so much watery putty. If you
 parse HTML with regex you are giving in to Them and their blasphemous ways which doom us all to
 inhuman toil for the One whose Name cannot be expressed in the Basic Multilingual Plane, he comes.
 HTML-plus-regexp will liquify the nerves of the sentient whilst you observe, your psyche withering in the
 onslaught of horror. Regex-based HTML parsers are the cancer that is killing StackOverflow it is too late
 it is too late we cannot be saved the trangession of a child ensures regex will consume all living tissue
 (except for HTML which it cannot, as previously prophesied) dear lord help us how can anyone survive
 this scourge using regex to parse HTML has doomed humanity to an eternity of dread torture and
 security holes using regex as a tool to process HTML establishes a breach between this world and the
 dread realm of čorrupt entities (like SGML entities, but more corrupt) a mere glimpse of the world of reg
 ex parsers for HTML will instantly transport a programmer's consciousness into a world of ceaseless
 screaming, he comes-the pestilent slithy regex-infection will devour your HTML parser, application and
 existence for all time like Vişual Basic only worse he comes he comes do not fight he comes, his uņholy
 radiance destroping all enlightenment, HTML tags leaking frọm your eyesiike liquid pain, the song of
 regular expression parsing-will extinguish the voices of mortal man from the sphere I can see it can you
 see t it is beautiful the f inal snuf fing of the lies of Man ALL ĮS LOSTALL IS LOST the pony he
 comes he comes hejcemes the ichor permeates al MY FACEFACEh god no NO NOOoo Ne
 stop the an ges aře not reâj ZALGO IS TON THË PONY, HECOMES
 1811
 Have you tried using an XML parser instead?
 link edit flag
 edited Nov 14 at 0:18
 community wiki
 bobince
regex and html

regex and html

Apparently, Confused, and Friends: solarmorrigan So. 10th grade English class, We all come in one morning to find a balloon and a perfectly sharpened pencil on each of our desks. No instructions, no explanation, which is strange, because our teacher is meticulous about that sort of thing A couple of people try to ask her and she says we'll get to it. She takes role and then announces that she needs to go to the copy room and she'll be back in a couple of minutes Kinda unorthodox, but no one is complaining because this is advanced English and the teacher usually goes kinda hard. So. y'know. Brief respite. We all sit and chat, one of the boys teasingly steals a girl's bailoon, but gives it back to her easily enough; it's quiet and kind of a nice break. Then the teacher comes back stops in the doorway, and just stares at us After a long moment she says, confused, "You didn't pop the balloons To which one of the guys about two rows over exclaims, "We re allowed to pop them? and immediately turms around and stabs his friend's balloon with the pencil There is a vicious revenge balloon-stabbing, and a few more people pop seatmates balloons or their own, and the whole time the teacher is just shaking her head. 1 can't believe you didn't pop your balloons Apparently we were starting Lord of the Fies that day and she wanted to demonstrate the basic concept of kids turning on each other when there are no authority figures present and it was basically my favorite failed social experiment ever vansnailismylife Back in my 10th grade we did a similar things around Lord of the Flies, where we had a test scheduled for that day, and when we walked in, the teacher took role by looking through the window of the door and never entered the classroom On the board were three tasks written and the teacher had brought in donuts. At first we all sat around and waited for the teacher to come in, but eventually we just started tackling the ist of tasks. Task 1-the test. Everybody took it silently, no one cheated, everyone turned it in and we went on to Task Two tidy up the room, So we did, we split into a couple groups and each one cleaned an area of the room. Task Three Hand out the donuts. There were 12 donuts, and 30 of us. So we split the donuts into thirds, each took a third, and left the extras for the teacher After this, the teacher came in absolutely FUMING She was so upset we had followed all the rules and completed the tasks. Apparently she had been texting kids telling them to start some chaos but they all ignored it because they were too nice She tied to dock our grades for not going absolutely wild because it meant her class didnt get the point across hookedonafeeeling That's because lord of the flies isnt representative of humanity its representative of rich white male shitheads
Apparently, Confused, and Friends: solarmorrigan
 So. 10th grade English class, We all come in one morning to find a balloon and
 a perfectly sharpened pencil on each of our desks. No instructions, no
 explanation, which is strange, because our teacher is meticulous about that sort
 of thing A couple of people try to ask her and she says we'll get to it. She takes
 role and then announces that she needs to go to the copy room and she'll be
 back in a couple of minutes
 Kinda unorthodox, but no one is complaining because this is advanced English
 and the teacher usually goes kinda hard. So. y'know. Brief respite. We all sit and
 chat, one of the boys teasingly steals a girl's bailoon, but gives it back to her
 easily enough; it's quiet and kind of a nice break. Then the teacher comes back
 stops in the doorway, and just stares at us
 After a long moment she says, confused, "You didn't pop the balloons
 To which one of the guys about two rows over exclaims, "We re allowed to pop
 them? and immediately turms around and stabs his friend's balloon with the
 pencil
 There is a vicious revenge balloon-stabbing, and a few more people pop
 seatmates balloons or their own, and the whole time the teacher is just shaking
 her head. 1 can't believe you didn't pop your balloons
 Apparently we were starting Lord of the Fies that day and she wanted to
 demonstrate the basic concept of kids turning on each other when there are no
 authority figures present and it was basically my favorite failed social experiment
 ever
 vansnailismylife
 Back in my 10th grade we did a similar things around Lord of the Flies, where
 we had a test scheduled for that day, and when we walked in, the teacher took
 role by looking through the window of the door and never entered the classroom
 On the board were three tasks written and the teacher had brought in donuts. At
 first we all sat around and waited for the teacher to come in, but eventually we
 just started tackling the ist of tasks. Task 1-the test. Everybody took it silently,
 no one cheated, everyone turned it in and we went on to Task Two tidy up the
 room, So we did, we split into a couple groups and each one cleaned an area of
 the room. Task Three Hand out the donuts. There were 12 donuts, and 30 of us.
 So we split the donuts into thirds, each took a third, and left the extras for the
 teacher After this, the teacher came in absolutely FUMING She was so upset
 we had followed all the rules and completed the tasks. Apparently she had been
 texting kids telling them to start some chaos but they all ignored it because they
 were too nice She tied to dock our grades for not going absolutely wild
 because it meant her class didnt get the point across
 hookedonafeeeling
 That's because lord of the flies isnt representative of humanity its
 representative of rich white male shitheads

Children, Life, and Shopping: Jonnie Hallman Gestern @destroytoday Still have no idea how people can... work a full-time job cook dinner often exercise regularly enjoy weekends keep the apartment clean Seems basic, but I can't consistently do it. shine a light Vor 14 Stunden @rknLA Current full-time (40hr/wk) jobs aren't designed for single people to do this; they're post-war relics & depend on the unpaid labor of a spouse for cooking, cleaning, shopping, etc. You're not deficient for not being able to do it yourself roach-works: i went into my 40-50 hr/week manual labor job with the explicit agreement with my spouse that i would do the paid labor and they’d be my pit crew. i get home too tired to cook by the end of the week, almost too tired to eat. all my younger coworkers are destroying their kidneys with caffeinated sports drinks, and the men who participate in the care of their children come to work looking like miserable zombies. my friend russel loves his kids and spends all weekend with them and comes into work on monday looking like he’s one sneeze away from the grave because he couldn’t get enough sleep.  you can’t have a good life when 40 hours a week are spent laboring. there’s no room for cooking or cleaning or children, you HAVE to trade necessary rest for those things. it’s a huge sexist problem that we don’t expect men to cook, clean, or care for children, because it’s also a huge sexist problem that traditional work/life ‘balance’ of a 40-hour work week completely prohibits people from fully engaging in life outside of labor.  letting women into the workforce was a great first step. redefining how much work anyone should be working is the necessary next one. 
Children, Life, and Shopping: Jonnie Hallman
 Gestern
 @destroytoday
 Still have no idea how people can...
 work a full-time job
 cook dinner often
 exercise regularly
 enjoy weekends
 keep the apartment clean
 Seems basic, but I can't consistently do it.
 shine a light
 Vor 14 Stunden
 @rknLA
 Current full-time (40hr/wk) jobs aren't
 designed for single people to do this; they're
 post-war relics & depend on the unpaid labor
 of a spouse for cooking, cleaning, shopping,
 etc.
 You're not deficient for not being able to do it
 yourself
roach-works:
i went into my 40-50 hr/week manual labor job with the explicit agreement with my spouse that i would do the paid labor and they’d be my pit crew. i get home too tired to cook by the end of the week, almost too tired to eat. all my younger coworkers are destroying their kidneys with caffeinated sports drinks, and the men who participate in the care of their children come to work looking like miserable zombies. my friend russel loves his kids and spends all weekend with them and comes into work on monday looking like he’s one sneeze away from the grave because he couldn’t get enough sleep. 
you can’t have a good life when 40 hours a week are spent laboring. there’s no room for cooking or cleaning or children, you HAVE to trade necessary rest for those things. it’s a huge sexist problem that we don’t expect men to cook, clean, or care for children, because it’s also a huge sexist problem that traditional work/life ‘balance’ of a 40-hour work week completely prohibits people from fully engaging in life outside of labor. 
letting women into the workforce was a great first step. redefining how much work anyone should be working is the necessary next one. 

roach-works: i went into my 40-50 hr/week manual labor job with the explicit agreement with my spouse that i would do the paid labor and the...

Dad, Definitely, and God: Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRRomeo I just had such an affirming experience. On my 8hr intl flight back from a conference, I sat next to a father/son. In broken English, the father began to apologize/ warn me that his 10 yr-old son had severe nonverbal autism, and that this would like be a difficult journey. 1/ 2:59 p.m. 28 Aug. 19 Twitter Web App 41.3K Retweets 178K Likes Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h Replying to@RachelRRomeo I told him not to worry, I was a speech-language pathologist with lots of experience with minimally verbal kiddos. Challenging behaviors began even before take off: screaming, hitting me, and grabbing for my things. The father repeatedly apologized, but did little else. 2/ 55 19.2K ti 813 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR.. 18h I asked him how his son preferred to communicate. He didn't seem to understand. Perhaps this was a language barrier, but I think instead the child had very little experience with communication therapy. I put away the talk I was working on & asked if I could try. He nodded. 3/ 11 18.1K t 705 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h I tried to see if he was stimulable for a communication board. I started by pulling up some standard images for basic nouns on my computer but I could tell that screens really bothered him. So I summoned my god-awful drawing skills and tried to create a (very!) low-tech board. 4/ 13 18.3K t 680 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h And by god, it clicked. I made symbols for the things he was grabbing, for his favorite stuffed penguin, and for his dad. He took to it very quickly. I introduced way more symbols that I normally would, but hey, how often do we get an 8-hour session?! 5/ 20 22.6K t 768 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h By the end of the flight, he had made several requests, initiated several times, & his behaviors had reduced quite a bit. The father was astounded clearly no one had ever tried an AAC approach with him. I gave him the paper & showed him how to use it, and he nearly cried. 6/ 105 28.5K t 992 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h This was the human desire for communication, pure and simple. To connect with another person and share a thought. Communication is a basic human right, and I was overjoyed to help someone find it. What a privilege and a gift. 7/ 172 t 2,713 48.5K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. As I face the upcoming job cycle and the nearly endless imposter syndrome of academia, this was precisely the reminder I needed about why I love studying language/communication development. It was a good day to be an #SLP! 8/8 18h 2,387 t 2,987 94K Not sure if it was posted here but definitely should be
Dad, Definitely, and God: Rachel R. Romeo
 @RachelRRomeo
 I just had such an affirming
 experience. On my 8hr intl flight
 back from a conference, I sat next
 to a father/son. In broken English,
 the father began to apologize/
 warn me that his 10 yr-old son
 had severe nonverbal autism, and
 that this would like be a difficult
 journey. 1/
 2:59 p.m. 28 Aug. 19 Twitter Web App
 41.3K Retweets 178K Likes
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 Replying to@RachelRRomeo
 I told him not to worry, I was a
 speech-language pathologist with lots of
 experience with minimally verbal kiddos.
 Challenging behaviors began even
 before take off: screaming, hitting me,
 and grabbing for my things. The father
 repeatedly apologized, but did little else.
 2/
 55
 19.2K
 ti 813
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR.. 18h
 I asked him how his son preferred to
 communicate. He didn't seem to
 understand. Perhaps this was a
 language barrier, but I think instead the
 child had very little experience with
 communication therapy. I put away the
 talk I was working on & asked if I could
 try. He nodded. 3/
 11
 18.1K
 t 705
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h
 I tried to see if he was stimulable for a
 communication board. I started by
 pulling up some standard images for
 basic nouns on my computer but I could
 tell that screens really bothered him. So I
 summoned my god-awful drawing skills
 and tried to create a (very!) low-tech
 board. 4/
 13
 18.3K
 t 680
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 And by god, it clicked. I made symbols
 for the things he was grabbing, for his
 favorite stuffed penguin, and for his dad.
 He took to it very quickly. I introduced
 way more symbols that I normally would,
 but hey, how often do we get an 8-hour
 session?! 5/
 20
 22.6K
 t 768
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 By the end of the flight, he had made
 several requests, initiated several times,
 & his behaviors had reduced quite a bit.
 The father was astounded clearly no
 one had ever tried an AAC approach with
 him. I gave him the paper & showed him
 how to use it, and he nearly cried. 6/
 105
 28.5K
 t 992
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 This was the human desire for
 communication, pure and simple. To
 connect with another person and share a
 thought. Communication is a basic
 human right, and I was overjoyed to help
 someone find it. What a privilege and a
 gift. 7/
 172
 t 2,713 48.5K
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR..
 As I face the upcoming job cycle and the
 nearly endless imposter syndrome of
 academia, this was precisely the
 reminder I needed about why I love
 studying language/communication
 development. It was a good day to be an
 #SLP! 8/8
 18h
 2,387 t 2,987
 94K
Not sure if it was posted here but definitely should be

Not sure if it was posted here but definitely should be

Dad, God, and Journey: Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRRomeo I just had such an affirming experience. On my 8hr intl flight back from a conference, I sat next to a father/son. In broken English, the father began to apologize/ warn me that his 10 yr-old son had severe nonverbal autism, and that this would like be a difficult journey. 1/ 2:59 p.m. 28 Aug. 19 Twitter Web App 41.3K Retweets 178K Likes Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h Replying to @RachelRRomeo I told him not to worry, I was a speech-language pathologist with lots of experience with minimally verbal kiddos. Challenging behaviors began even before take off: screaming, hitting me, and grabbing for my things. The father repeatedly apologized, but did little else. 2/ 55 19.2K t 813 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h I asked him how his son preferred to communicate. He didn't seem to understand. Perhaps this was a language barrier, but I think instead the child had very little experience with communication therapy. I put away the talk I was working on & asked if I could try. He nodded. 3/ 11 18.1K t 705 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h I tried to see if he was stimulable for a communication board. I started by pulling up some standard images for basic nouns on my computer but I could tell that screens really bothered him. So I summoned my god-awful drawing skills and tried to create a (very!) low-tech board. 4/ 13 18.3K t 680 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h And by god, it clicked. I made symbols for the things he was grabbing, for his favorite stuffed penguin, and for his dad. He took to it very quickly. I introduced way more symbols that I normally would, but hey, how often do we get an 8-hour session?! 5/ 20 22.6K t 768 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h By the end of the flight, he had made several requests, initiated several times, & his behaviors had reduced quite a bit. The father was astounded clearly no one had ever tried an AAC approach with him. I gave him the paper & showed him how to use it, and he nearly cried. 6/ 105 28.5K t 992 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h This was the human desire for communication, pure and simple. To connect with another person and share a thought. Communication is a basic human right, and I was overjoyed to help someone find it. What a privilege and a gift. 7/ 172 t 2,713 48.5K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... As I face the upcoming job cycle and the nearly endless imposter syndrome of academia, this was precisely the reminder I needed about why I love studying language/communication development. It was a good day to be an 18h #SLP! 8/8 2,387 t 2,987 94K This👏Is👏Verry👏Wholesome
Dad, God, and Journey: Rachel R. Romeo
 @RachelRRomeo
 I just had such an affirming
 experience. On my 8hr intl flight
 back from a conference, I sat next
 to a father/son. In broken English,
 the father began to apologize/
 warn me that his 10 yr-old son
 had severe nonverbal autism, and
 that this would like be a difficult
 journey. 1/
 2:59 p.m. 28 Aug. 19 Twitter Web App
 41.3K Retweets 178K Likes
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 Replying to @RachelRRomeo
 I told him not to worry, I was a
 speech-language pathologist with lots of
 experience with minimally verbal kiddos.
 Challenging behaviors began even
 before take off: screaming, hitting me,
 and grabbing for my things. The father
 repeatedly apologized, but did little else.
 2/
 55
 19.2K
 t 813
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h
 I asked him how his son preferred to
 communicate. He didn't seem to
 understand. Perhaps this was a
 language barrier, but I think instead the
 child had very little experience with
 communication therapy. I put away the
 talk I was working on & asked if I could
 try. He nodded. 3/
 11
 18.1K
 t 705
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h
 I tried to see if he was stimulable for a
 communication board. I started by
 pulling up some standard images for
 basic nouns on my computer but I could
 tell that screens really bothered him. So I
 summoned my god-awful drawing skills
 and tried to create a (very!) low-tech
 board. 4/
 13
 18.3K
 t 680
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 And by god, it clicked. I made symbols
 for the things he was grabbing, for his
 favorite stuffed penguin, and for his dad.
 He took to it very quickly. I introduced
 way more symbols that I normally would,
 but hey, how often do we get an 8-hour
 session?! 5/
 20
 22.6K
 t 768
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 By the end of the flight, he had made
 several requests, initiated several times,
 & his behaviors had reduced quite a bit.
 The father was astounded clearly no
 one had ever tried an AAC approach with
 him. I gave him the paper & showed him
 how to use it, and he nearly cried. 6/
 105
 28.5K
 t 992
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 This was the human desire for
 communication, pure and simple. To
 connect with another person and share a
 thought. Communication is a basic
 human right, and I was overjoyed to help
 someone find it. What a privilege and a
 gift. 7/
 172
 t 2,713 48.5K
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR...
 As I face the upcoming job cycle and the
 nearly endless imposter syndrome of
 academia, this was precisely the
 reminder I needed about why I love
 studying language/communication
 development. It was a good day to be an
 18h
 #SLP! 8/8
 2,387 t 2,987
 94K
This👏Is👏Verry👏Wholesome

This👏Is👏Verry👏Wholesome

Dad, God, and Journey: Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRRomeo I just had such an affirming experience. On my 8hr intl flight back from a conference, I sat next to a father/son. In broken English, the father began to apologize/ warn me that his ~10 yr-old son had severe nonverbal autism, and that this would like be a difficult journey. 1/ 2:59 p.m. 28 Aug. 19 Twitter Web App 41.3K Retweets 178K Likes Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h Replying to @Rachel RRomeo I told him not to worry, I was a speech-language pathologist with lots of experience with minimally verbal kiddos. Challenging behaviors began even before take off: screaming, hitting me, and grabbing for my things. The father repeatedly apologized, but did little else 2/ t 813 19.2K 55 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR...18h I asked him how his son preferred to communicate. He didn't seem to understand. Perhaps this was a language barrier, but I think instead the child had very little experience with communication therapy. I put away the talk I was working on & asked if I could try. He nodded. 3/ 11 L 705 18.1K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h I tried to see if he was stimulable for a communication board. I started by pulling up some standard images for basic nouns on my computer but I could tell that screens really bothered him. So I summoned my god-awful drawing skills and tried to create a (very!) low-tech board. 4/ 1680 13 18.3K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h And by god, it clicked. I made symbols for the things he was favorite stuffed penguin, and for his dad. He took to it very quickly. I introduced way more symbols that I normally would, but hey, how often do we get an 8-hour session?! 5/ grabbing, for his Li 768 20 22.6K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h By the end of the flight, he had made several requests, initiated several times, & his behaviors had reduced quite a bit. The father was astounded clearly no one had ever tried an AAC approach with him. I gave him the paper & showed him how to use it, and he nearly cried. 6/ 1992 105 28.5K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h This was the human desire for communication, pure and simple. To connect with another person and share a thought. Communication is a basic human right, and I was overjoyed to help someone find it. What a privilege and a gift. 7/ t 2,713 48.5K 172 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h As I face the upcoming job cycle and the nearly endless imposter syndrome of academia, this was precisely the reminder I needed about why l love studying language/communication development. It was a good day to be an #SLP ! 8/8 2,387 2,987 94K
Dad, God, and Journey: Rachel R. Romeo
 @RachelRRomeo
 I just had such an affirming
 experience. On my 8hr intl flight
 back from a conference, I sat next
 to a father/son. In broken English,
 the father began to apologize/
 warn me that his ~10 yr-old son
 had severe nonverbal autism, and
 that this would like be a difficult
 journey. 1/
 2:59 p.m. 28 Aug. 19 Twitter Web App
 41.3K Retweets 178K Likes
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h
 Replying to @Rachel RRomeo
 I told him not to worry, I was a
 speech-language pathologist with lots of
 experience with minimally verbal kiddos.
 Challenging behaviors began even
 before take off: screaming, hitting me,
 and grabbing for my things. The father
 repeatedly apologized, but did little else
 2/
 t 813
 19.2K
 55

 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR...18h
 I asked him how his son preferred to
 communicate. He didn't seem to
 understand. Perhaps this was a
 language barrier, but I think instead the
 child had very little experience with
 communication therapy. I put away the
 talk I was working on & asked if I could
 try. He nodded. 3/
 11
 L 705
 18.1K
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h
 I tried to see if he was stimulable for a
 communication board. I started by
 pulling up some standard images for
 basic nouns on my computer but I could
 tell that screens really bothered him. So I
 summoned my god-awful drawing skills
 and tried to create a (very!) low-tech
 board. 4/
 1680
 13
 18.3K
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h
 And by god, it clicked. I made symbols
 for the things he was
 favorite stuffed penguin, and for his dad.
 He took to it very quickly. I introduced
 way more symbols that I normally would,
 but hey, how often do we get an 8-hour
 session?! 5/
 grabbing, for his
 Li 768
 20
 22.6K

 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h
 By the end of the flight, he had made
 several requests, initiated several times,
 & his behaviors had reduced quite a bit.
 The father was astounded clearly no
 one had ever tried an AAC approach with
 him. I gave him the paper & showed him
 how to use it, and he nearly cried. 6/
 1992
 105
 28.5K
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h
 This was the human desire for
 communication, pure and simple. To
 connect with another person and share a
 thought. Communication is a basic
 human right, and I was overjoyed to help
 someone find it. What a privilege and a
 gift. 7/
 t 2,713 48.5K
 172
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... 18h
 As I face the upcoming job cycle and the
 nearly endless imposter syndrome of
 academia, this was precisely the
 reminder I needed about why l love
 studying language/communication
 development. It was a good day to be an
 #SLP ! 8/8
 2,387 2,987
 94K
Dad, Definitely, and God: Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRRomeo I just had such an affirming experience. On my 8hr intl flight back from a conference, I sat next to a father/son. In broken English, the father began to apologize/ warn me that his 10 yr-old son had severe nonverbal autism, and that this would like be a difficult journey. 1/ 2:59 p.m. 28 Aug. 19 Twitter Web App 41.3K Retweets 178K Likes Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h Replying to@RachelRRomeo I told him not to worry, I was a speech-language pathologist with lots of experience with minimally verbal kiddos. Challenging behaviors began even before take off: screaming, hitting me, and grabbing for my things. The father repeatedly apologized, but did little else. 2/ 55 19.2K ti 813 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR.. 18h I asked him how his son preferred to communicate. He didn't seem to understand. Perhaps this was a language barrier, but I think instead the child had very little experience with communication therapy. I put away the talk I was working on & asked if I could try. He nodded. 3/ 11 18.1K t 705 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h I tried to see if he was stimulable for a communication board. I started by pulling up some standard images for basic nouns on my computer but I could tell that screens really bothered him. So I summoned my god-awful drawing skills and tried to create a (very!) low-tech board. 4/ 13 18.3K t 680 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h And by god, it clicked. I made symbols for the things he was grabbing, for his favorite stuffed penguin, and for his dad. He took to it very quickly. I introduced way more symbols that I normally would, but hey, how often do we get an 8-hour session?! 5/ 20 22.6K t 768 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h By the end of the flight, he had made several requests, initiated several times, & his behaviors had reduced quite a bit. The father was astounded clearly no one had ever tried an AAC approach with him. I gave him the paper & showed him how to use it, and he nearly cried. 6/ 105 28.5K t 992 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h This was the human desire for communication, pure and simple. To connect with another person and share a thought. Communication is a basic human right, and I was overjoyed to help someone find it. What a privilege and a gift. 7/ 172 t 2,713 48.5K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. As I face the upcoming job cycle and the nearly endless imposter syndrome of academia, this was precisely the reminder I needed about why I love studying language/communication development. It was a good day to be an #SLP! 8/8 18h 2,387 t 2,987 94K Not sure if it was posted here but definitely should be via /r/wholesomememes https://ift.tt/2MMRPIo
Dad, Definitely, and God: Rachel R. Romeo
 @RachelRRomeo
 I just had such an affirming
 experience. On my 8hr intl flight
 back from a conference, I sat next
 to a father/son. In broken English,
 the father began to apologize/
 warn me that his 10 yr-old son
 had severe nonverbal autism, and
 that this would like be a difficult
 journey. 1/
 2:59 p.m. 28 Aug. 19 Twitter Web App
 41.3K Retweets 178K Likes
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 Replying to@RachelRRomeo
 I told him not to worry, I was a
 speech-language pathologist with lots of
 experience with minimally verbal kiddos.
 Challenging behaviors began even
 before take off: screaming, hitting me,
 and grabbing for my things. The father
 repeatedly apologized, but did little else.
 2/
 55
 19.2K
 ti 813
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR.. 18h
 I asked him how his son preferred to
 communicate. He didn't seem to
 understand. Perhaps this was a
 language barrier, but I think instead the
 child had very little experience with
 communication therapy. I put away the
 talk I was working on & asked if I could
 try. He nodded. 3/
 11
 18.1K
 t 705
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h
 I tried to see if he was stimulable for a
 communication board. I started by
 pulling up some standard images for
 basic nouns on my computer but I could
 tell that screens really bothered him. So I
 summoned my god-awful drawing skills
 and tried to create a (very!) low-tech
 board. 4/
 13
 18.3K
 t 680
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 And by god, it clicked. I made symbols
 for the things he was grabbing, for his
 favorite stuffed penguin, and for his dad.
 He took to it very quickly. I introduced
 way more symbols that I normally would,
 but hey, how often do we get an 8-hour
 session?! 5/
 20
 22.6K
 t 768
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 By the end of the flight, he had made
 several requests, initiated several times,
 & his behaviors had reduced quite a bit.
 The father was astounded clearly no
 one had ever tried an AAC approach with
 him. I gave him the paper & showed him
 how to use it, and he nearly cried. 6/
 105
 28.5K
 t 992
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 This was the human desire for
 communication, pure and simple. To
 connect with another person and share a
 thought. Communication is a basic
 human right, and I was overjoyed to help
 someone find it. What a privilege and a
 gift. 7/
 172
 t 2,713 48.5K
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR..
 As I face the upcoming job cycle and the
 nearly endless imposter syndrome of
 academia, this was precisely the
 reminder I needed about why I love
 studying language/communication
 development. It was a good day to be an
 #SLP! 8/8
 18h
 2,387 t 2,987
 94K
Not sure if it was posted here but definitely should be via /r/wholesomememes https://ift.tt/2MMRPIo

Not sure if it was posted here but definitely should be via /r/wholesomememes https://ift.tt/2MMRPIo

Dad, God, and Journey: Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRRomeo I just had such an affirming experience. On my 8hr intl flight back from a conference, I sat next to a father/son. In broken English, the father began to apologize/ warn me that his 10 yr-old son had severe nonverbal autism, and that this would like be a difficult journey. 1/ 2:59 p.m. 28 Aug. 19 Twitter Web App 41.3K Retweets 178K Likes Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h Replying to @RachelRRomeo I told him not to worry, I was a speech-language pathologist with lots of experience with minimally verbal kiddos. Challenging behaviors began even before take off: screaming, hitting me, and grabbing for my things. The father repeatedly apologized, but did little else. 2/ 55 19.2K t 813 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h I asked him how his son preferred to communicate. He didn't seem to understand. Perhaps this was a language barrier, but I think instead the child had very little experience with communication therapy. I put away the talk I was working on & asked if I could try. He nodded. 3/ 11 18.1K t 705 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h I tried to see if he was stimulable for a communication board. I started by pulling up some standard images for basic nouns on my computer but I could tell that screens really bothered him. So I summoned my god-awful drawing skills and tried to create a (very!) low-tech board. 4/ 13 18.3K t 680 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h And by god, it clicked. I made symbols for the things he was grabbing, for his favorite stuffed penguin, and for his dad. He took to it very quickly. I introduced way more symbols that I normally would, but hey, how often do we get an 8-hour session?! 5/ 20 22.6K t 768 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h By the end of the flight, he had made several requests, initiated several times, & his behaviors had reduced quite a bit. The father was astounded clearly no one had ever tried an AAC approach with him. I gave him the paper & showed him how to use it, and he nearly cried. 6/ 105 28.5K t 992 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h This was the human desire for communication, pure and simple. To connect with another person and share a thought. Communication is a basic human right, and I was overjoyed to help someone find it. What a privilege and a gift. 7/ 172 t 2,713 48.5K Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR... As I face the upcoming job cycle and the nearly endless imposter syndrome of academia, this was precisely the reminder I needed about why I love studying language/communication development. It was a good day to be an 18h #SLP! 8/8 2,387 t 2,987 94K This👏Is👏Verry👏Wholesome
Dad, God, and Journey: Rachel R. Romeo
 @RachelRRomeo
 I just had such an affirming
 experience. On my 8hr intl flight
 back from a conference, I sat next
 to a father/son. In broken English,
 the father began to apologize/
 warn me that his 10 yr-old son
 had severe nonverbal autism, and
 that this would like be a difficult
 journey. 1/
 2:59 p.m. 28 Aug. 19 Twitter Web App
 41.3K Retweets 178K Likes
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 Replying to @RachelRRomeo
 I told him not to worry, I was a
 speech-language pathologist with lots of
 experience with minimally verbal kiddos.
 Challenging behaviors began even
 before take off: screaming, hitting me,
 and grabbing for my things. The father
 repeatedly apologized, but did little else.
 2/
 55
 19.2K
 t 813
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h
 I asked him how his son preferred to
 communicate. He didn't seem to
 understand. Perhaps this was a
 language barrier, but I think instead the
 child had very little experience with
 communication therapy. I put away the
 talk I was working on & asked if I could
 try. He nodded. 3/
 11
 18.1K
 t 705
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelR... 18h
 I tried to see if he was stimulable for a
 communication board. I started by
 pulling up some standard images for
 basic nouns on my computer but I could
 tell that screens really bothered him. So I
 summoned my god-awful drawing skills
 and tried to create a (very!) low-tech
 board. 4/
 13
 18.3K
 t 680
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 And by god, it clicked. I made symbols
 for the things he was grabbing, for his
 favorite stuffed penguin, and for his dad.
 He took to it very quickly. I introduced
 way more symbols that I normally would,
 but hey, how often do we get an 8-hour
 session?! 5/
 20
 22.6K
 t 768
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 By the end of the flight, he had made
 several requests, initiated several times,
 & his behaviors had reduced quite a bit.
 The father was astounded clearly no
 one had ever tried an AAC approach with
 him. I gave him the paper & showed him
 how to use it, and he nearly cried. 6/
 105
 28.5K
 t 992
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR.. 18h
 This was the human desire for
 communication, pure and simple. To
 connect with another person and share a
 thought. Communication is a basic
 human right, and I was overjoyed to help
 someone find it. What a privilege and a
 gift. 7/
 172
 t 2,713 48.5K
 Rachel R. Romeo @RachelRR...
 As I face the upcoming job cycle and the
 nearly endless imposter syndrome of
 academia, this was precisely the
 reminder I needed about why I love
 studying language/communication
 development. It was a good day to be an
 18h
 #SLP! 8/8
 2,387 t 2,987
 94K
This👏Is👏Verry👏Wholesome

This👏Is👏Verry👏Wholesome