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Children, Clothes, and Fail: gaming: Indie Game Spotlight: Untitled Goose Game  Oh, boy, do we have an extra super horrible Indie Game Spotlight exclusive for you today! We’re talking, of course, of Untitled Goose Game, a slapstick simulator, where you play a goose hassling a town full of people who would very much like you to stop hassling them, please. It feels a bit like playing the videogame version of an old cartoon, complete with reactive soundtrack. Everything that happens in the game is very low stakes (the goose doesn’t get involved in political scandals, or drive a car off a ramp etc.), but there’s a lot of room for comedic performance in doing things like stealing clothes off a washing line and dumping them in a pond. The team at House House shares roles a lot, and so the game was predominantly designed collaboratively by four people. We chatted with Stuart Gillespie-Cook, who mostly works on animation. Also within House House is Jake Strasser, largely responsible for the design of levels and environments, Nico Disseldorp who does all the programming, and Michael McMaster who mostly works on art direction and UI. The iconic sound effects were made by Em Halberstadt, and Dan Golding designed the music. There’s also art from Kalonica Quigley and additional UI programming from Cherie Davidson. Stuart Gave us the lowdown on the curious title, the game mechanics, and dream crossovers. Read on! What’s the story behind the title of the game? This more or less happened by accident; at first, we just needed something to put on a video we were submitting to a festival. It’s become one of the best things about the game, and I’m so glad we stuck with it. I will say it’s a weird thing to explain when your very not-online hairdresser asks you “oh, what game are you working on?”  How did the team come up with the animation style? The whole visual style of the game is designed to be nice and clean, very readable and approachable. The animation specifically takes a lot of inspiration from slapstick and pantomime—with big, over the top reactions that are impossible to miss. We wanted to squeeze as much emotion as possible out of these people without facial expressions, so everything has to be evoked with body language. We also lean heavily on two dimensional, hand-drawn effects that are lifted from comics—lines to represent the direction of a honk, stars when someone hits their thumb with a hammer, etc. Untitled Goose Game offers a unique take on the puzzle genre. What other mechanics can we expect? Because it’s a game that’s largely about interacting with a bunch of people, the game borrows heavily from AI systems in stealth games. Playing with a character’s awareness of where the goose is, where they left their stuff, where that sound came from etc. is a big part of the comedy of the game. So, while it’s less restrictive than most stealth games, and there’s no real fail state (ie. if a character sees a goose, they’ll think “ah, there’s a goose” rather than “I’d better shoot and kill that spy”), those explicit behaviours that are so present in the stealth genre are really important in our goose game. If you could have the goose cross over into any cinematic or game universe, what would it be and why? It would be nice to see the goose chase Postman Pat over a hedgerow. That era of British children’s television has been a huge influence on the game. Otherwise, we’re always open to having the goose in Smash. Are you ready to fulfill your wildest dreams of becoming a mischevious goose and harassing people? Of course you are! Check out the website to find out how you can get your hands wings on Untitled Goose Game!
Children, Clothes, and Fail: gaming:
Indie Game Spotlight: Untitled Goose Game 
Oh, boy, do we have an extra super horrible Indie Game Spotlight exclusive for you today! We’re talking, of course, of Untitled Goose Game, a slapstick simulator, where you play a goose hassling a town full of people who would very much like you to stop hassling them, please. It feels a bit like playing the videogame version of an old cartoon, complete with reactive soundtrack. Everything that happens in the game is very low stakes (the goose doesn’t get involved in political scandals, or drive a car off a ramp etc.), but there’s a lot of room for comedic performance in doing things like stealing clothes off a washing line and dumping them in a pond.
The team at House House shares roles a lot, and so the game was predominantly designed collaboratively by four people. We chatted with Stuart Gillespie-Cook, who mostly works on animation. Also within House House is Jake Strasser, largely responsible for the design of levels and environments, Nico Disseldorp who does all the programming, and Michael McMaster who mostly works on art direction and UI. The iconic sound effects were made by Em Halberstadt, and Dan Golding designed the music. There’s also art from Kalonica Quigley and additional UI programming from Cherie Davidson. Stuart Gave us the lowdown on the curious title, the game mechanics, and dream crossovers. Read on!
What’s the story behind the title of the game?
This more or less happened by accident; at first, we just needed something to put on a video we were submitting to a festival. It’s become one of the best things about the game, and I’m so glad we stuck with it. I will say it’s a weird thing to explain when your very not-online hairdresser asks you “oh, what game are you working on?”  
How did the team come up with the animation style?
The whole visual style of the game is designed to be nice and clean, very readable and approachable. The animation specifically takes a lot of inspiration from slapstick and pantomime—with big, over the top reactions that are impossible to miss. We wanted to squeeze as much emotion as possible out of these people without facial expressions, so everything has to be evoked with body language. We also lean heavily on two dimensional, hand-drawn effects that are lifted from comics—lines to represent the direction of a honk, stars when someone hits their thumb with a hammer, etc.


Untitled Goose Game offers a unique take on the puzzle genre. What other mechanics can we expect?
Because it’s a game that’s largely about interacting with a bunch of people, the game borrows heavily from AI systems in stealth games. Playing with a character’s awareness of where the goose is, where they left their stuff, where that sound came from etc. is a big part of the comedy of the game. So, while it’s less restrictive than most stealth games, and there’s no real fail state (ie. if a character sees a goose, they’ll think “ah, there’s a goose” rather than “I’d better shoot and kill that spy”), those explicit behaviours that are so present in the stealth genre are really important in our goose game.
If you could have the goose cross over into any cinematic or game universe, what would it be and why?
It would be nice to see the goose chase Postman Pat over a hedgerow. That era of British children’s television has been a huge influence on the game. Otherwise, we’re always open to having the goose in Smash.
Are you ready to fulfill your wildest dreams of becoming a mischevious goose and harassing people? Of course you are! Check out the website to find out how you can get your hands wings on Untitled Goose Game!

gaming: Indie Game Spotlight: Untitled Goose Game  Oh, boy, do we have an extra super horrible Indie Game Spotlight exclusive for you today!...

Advice, Ass, and Dogs: laughhard More Web Videos Shopping Search tools Images News About 451,000 results (0.93 seconds) Showing results for i accidentally stepped on my dog's foot does he understand that it was an accident???? like i said sorry but mean does he know calleo Yes, if you react in a way similar to how another dog would react to accidentally harming a play mate or a pack mate. That's why, when dogs are playing (especially noticeable in puppies, as they're still learning bite inhibition), and one dog yelps loudly and sharply, like a dog does if you step on its paw or tail, if you react by immediately jumping back, not doing the thing again, and giving friendly, appeasing gestures (nice petting, scratching, chin scratching, etc...or if you were another dog, submissive gestures, muzzle licking, things that say 'nono sorry! I'm not a threat to you!") the dog does, in fact, realize that you weren't attacking or trying to be mean and that it was accidental. ear That's also why advice to puppy owners or owners trying to retrain a dog that was never taught to not bite during play are advised to yelp like a hurt dog if their puppy/dog gets too rough and immediately stop play and turn away, because that's a clear signal to the dog that they hurt you and you're upset now. Most dogs will immediately 'apologize' in dog language for that as, especially if it was during play, their intent wasn't to hurt anyone, just to have fun. They'll also tend to react that way if you yelp if they step on you. I know I've yelped at Bear a few times because his big 105lb ass is HEAVY and does not feel nice on a foot. plasticseeds Woah the reverse tactic Wow thefingerfuckingfemalefury glad that there is a way I can communicate an apology to a doggo if I accidentally step on their paw... because the only alternative would be exiling myself to the arctic to escape my shame This is SO IMPORTANT I am so luchadorgengar Can confirm this works btw, I used this info to train (ask) my dog to stop biting (she used to bite very hard with her very sharp teeth)
Advice, Ass, and Dogs: laughhard
 More
 Web
 Videos
 Shopping
 Search tools
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 About 451,000 results (0.93 seconds)
 Showing results for i accidentally stepped on my dog's foot does
 he understand that it was an accident???? like i said sorry but
 mean does he know
 calleo
 Yes, if you react in a way similar to how another
 dog would react to accidentally harming a play
 mate or a pack mate.
 That's why, when dogs are playing (especially
 noticeable in puppies, as they're still learning
 bite inhibition), and one dog yelps loudly and
 sharply, like a dog does if you step on its paw
 or tail, if you react by immediately jumping
 back, not doing the thing again, and giving
 friendly, appeasing gestures (nice petting,
 scratching, chin scratching, etc...or if you were
 another dog, submissive gestures, muzzle
 licking, things that say 'nono sorry! I'm not a
 threat to you!") the dog does, in fact, realize
 that you weren't attacking or trying to be mean
 and that it was accidental.
 ear
 That's also why advice to puppy owners or
 owners trying to retrain a dog that was never
 taught to not bite during play are advised to
 yelp like a hurt dog if their puppy/dog gets too
 rough and immediately stop play and turn away,
 because that's a clear signal to the dog that
 they hurt you and you're upset now.
 Most dogs will immediately 'apologize' in dog
 language for that as, especially if it was during
 play, their intent wasn't to hurt anyone, just to
 have fun. They'll also tend to react that way if
 you yelp if they step on you. I know I've yelped
 at Bear a few times because his big 105lb ass is
 HEAVY and does not feel nice on a foot.
 plasticseeds
 Woah the reverse tactic Wow
 thefingerfuckingfemalefury
 glad that there
 is a way I can communicate an apology to a
 doggo if I accidentally step on their paw...
 because the only alternative would be exiling
 myself to the arctic to escape my shame
 This is SO IMPORTANT I am so
 luchadorgengar
 Can confirm this works btw, I used this info to
 train (ask) my dog to stop biting (she used to
 bite very hard with her very sharp teeth)