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Advice, Ass, and Bad: Saving Your Grades From A Mental Health Crisis What To Do Before, During, And After by SmartStudy.tumblr.com IF YOUR GRADES ARE IN IMMEDIATE DANGER CONTACT YOUR TEACHERS This should be the first thing you do when you realise you're in crisis. Email them, and explain your situation in short, professional terms. You do not have to include details about your condition. "I have a mental health condition" should suffice as to the nature of the issue. Tell them that you are going to arrange to see a medical professional as soon as possible, and ask what process you should go through to defer/get an extension on assessment, and if they can help you in any way. Other people you may have to contact or CC in the email (depending on your school): University High School Head of House Class Coordinator Faculty/School Admin Disability Advisor Grade Coordinator Head of Department Academic Admin Counsellor School Counsellor Student Advocate BOOK A DOCTOR/THERAPIST APPOINTMENT ASAP This will be the person who can vouch for you the most. It's best if you have seen them before and they know you. If you can't get an appointment within a few days, call them and email them (if you haven't seen them before this will not work). Make sure to check out what counselling your university or school offers. During this appointment, the priority is to make a plan to get you back on your feet. This effort will not be useful if you stay a mess. Once you've figured that out, get two things from this person. One is a medical certificate/letter stating that you have, in fact, been going through this crisis. Second is a letter that describes the nature of the crisis, what treatment you're going through, and which people to contact (psychiatrists, etc.) who can vouch for this. Note: The reason I say to get two letters is because there is still a huge stigma around mental illness, and you don't want to reveal that you've got a disorder that's highly stigmatised, only to have it come back and bite you in the ass later. Don't provide details unless it's necessary or asked for. A STUDENT KNOW YOUR RIGHTS AS Most schools and institutions will have a list of a student's rights and responsibilities online. Look them up. Know what your rights are as a student. Also look to see if there are state/national laws protecting you, or if your school is a part of a network of schools that has its own code. Some people working in schools still think mental health issues are trivial, and you never know when they're going to ignore a rule to suit themselves. Make sure you can pick on this if it happens to you. Pretty much all schools will have protection in place for students with mental illnesses and disabilities, so even if you a miss a deadline for a form or make another mistake, they should take your exceptional circumstances into account. This is where a student or disability advisor from school can help you. ottom IF YOU HAVEN'T REACHED CRISIS YET TALK TO A DOCTOR/THERAPIST/COUNSELLOR/TRUSTED ADULT If you're going through a hard time, talk to someone who can help you. Any trusted adult or professional can help you get back on your feet before it's too late, or refer you to someone who can. If it's a new issue, you'll have to see someone like a GP who can refer you to a therapist or mental health service. Talk to them about what's been happening, and say that you need help. Sometimes, even talking about the problem can help you feel better. In these situations, they can also help you figure out what you can do at school to catch up/get special help. FIGURE OUT HOW TO STUDY WHILE IN A BAD STATE Even if you're getting help, it might be some time before you're fully back on track. In these instances, try to make the best of a bad situation. Can't leave the house? Access lecture recordings and eBooks. Ask your friends to send you their notes, or ask the teacher if you can submit your homework via email, or through a friend. Have trouble concentrating? Figure out how long you can study without needing a break, and make a schedule around that. Always make sure to ask your teachers if they can help you with this. Whether it be slightly changing the requirements or conditions of a piece of assessment, or simply their understanding that you may not be able to attend perfectly, it can make a big difference with your overall marks. If they don't know you're struggling, they can't help! DON'T PUSH YOURSELF OR OVERTHINK When you realise there's an issue, it's easy to fall into panic or try to power through. Don't do this. It'll just make you more stressed and aggravate the existing problems, which will make things much worse in the long run. Though it's hard to believe sometimes, your health and mental health are more important than your grades. You can't ignore your mind when it's screaming at you that something is wrong. Listen to it, and be easy on yourself. The best way to get back to your full potential to ask for help and give yourself what you need. Take a break when you need one and practise self-care. It's more important than you might things. RECOVERING FROM A BREAKDOWN ACCEPT THAT YOU'VE BEEN THROUGH SOMETHING MAJOR Once the worst has passed, some people try to brush it off and pretend it never happened. They can feel ashamed or embarrassed about what they went through. However, there is absolutely nothing to be ashamed or embarrassed about, especially if you had a pre-existing mental health condition. Every life has ups and downs and just because yours were a bit more serious than some people's, it doesn't mean that you're weak somehow. The best thing you can do for yourself is to recognise what happened, and work to prevent it from happening again by setting up crisis plans and support networks. GET TUTORING TO CATCH UP If you've fallen behind, don't worry. There are plenty of ways to catch yourself up and get back on track. The best way is to hire a tutor. They can guide you through the work, help you understand difficult concepts, and identify the places you need more help. Yes, tutors can be expensive, but there's a way to get around this. See if there is anyone who took your class the year before who might be willing to tutor you for an hour each week for a discounted prince. Similarly, see if there are any students who can help you in exchange for something like instrument lessons. And if any of your friends are academically gifted, I'm sure they'd be able to help. If all else fails, go to office hours and any free tutoring sessions your school or university offers. Do some research, ask around, see what's there. PACE YOURSELF AND DON'T RUSH IN After a breakdown or crisis, you may be tempted to throw yourself back into your work to catch up. Don't! You'll become overwhelmed and end up back at square one. Remember, you've just been through a very difficult situation and you're not going to get better overnight. Ease yourself in. I definitely recommend starting with a reduced or part-time study load if possible. Remember that you may not be back at your full capacity just yet, and difficulties concentrating and being motivated could make things hard. By starting off slowly, you're able to get used to studying again without too much pressure. DEVELOP A ROUTINE Yes, this advice is in every piece of study advice ever, but you shouldn't develop just any routine. Develop one that allows you plenty of breaks and takes into consider any issues you may have with fatigue or focusing. If your breakdown was caused by overwork, make sure this one is easier on you. Things to include you could include in a healthy routine (but don't micromanage!): "I feel crap" time* Breaks and meals Plenty of sleep and rest "You" time (treat yo self) Time to plan for the next week Exercise (have you tried yoga? Kidding) Meditation/mindfulness Friend/family social time * Remember that the thoughts and feelings caused by mental illness are not shameful, and ignoring and forcing them down will only make them worse. If you need to lie in bed feeling miserable, do it. THINGS TO REMEMBER DON'T COMPARE YOURSELF TO OTHERS It can be easy to look at other people and see your own flaws, but it's important to try not to. Every person has different experiences and struggles, so it's not fair to yourself to look at someone without yours and think you're behind in some way. Taking longer to complete your studies isn't shameful. Making mistakes isn't shameful. Needing breaks isn't shameful. You'll get where you need to be in the end. Have patience. GRADES DON'T DEFINE YOU I spent so much of my life thinking my only worth came from my academic success. And guess what? This just led to more anxiety and depression. It's important to realise that things like grades, class rankings, GPAS, and "intelligence" aren't that important. Who you are and what you do is far more important than these arbitrary labels. THERE IS A STIGMA, SO BE PREPARED It's an unfortunate reality, but there is still a stigma against mental health issues and there is a chance it might affect your experiences while dealing with administrative staff and teachers. There have been stories about people telling their people supposed to be guiding them that they have mental health issues, and being dismissed because "it's a girl issue" or "it's all in their head". Be prepared in case this happens to you. Remind people that it's a medical condition and that you can get proof from medical professionals if need be. Plus, there is probably something in your school's policies or even the law that protects you when you have a mental illness. Remember that just because people are ignorant, that doesn't mean your issue is not 100% real and important. Don't let these people make you feel worse. YOU CAN DO THIS In our darkest moments, it can be hard to believe that we're capable of immense strength, but I promise you we are. Whatever obstacle is in your path right now - even if it's your brain chemistry - you are going to get through this. You've made it through every worst day you've had so far. You've made it through the dark and scary moments, and you've come out the other end stronger and wiser. Remember that you are strong, and even when you don't feel like it, there is always support available to help you realise that strength again. tmblimteom apricot-studies: smartstudy: Hey guys. I’m glad to be finally posting my “mental breakdown survival guide”. As you know I struggle a lot with mental health, and so I have been through a lot of breakdowns. So many that I actually dropped out of university after 3 weeks in 2016 and had to take the whole year off. Because of this, I’ve made it my mission to help others with mental health issues as much as I can, so you don’t have to go through what I’ve been through. Anyway, here is my guide. I tried to keep it general, and actually useful. If you have any questions or additions please feel free to add them. And as ever, if you want to talk to me about studying with mental illness or want to see a post on a specific topic, please feel free to message me. thank you so much for this
Advice, Ass, and Bad: Saving Your Grades From
 A Mental Health Crisis
 What To Do Before, During, And After
 by SmartStudy.tumblr.com

 IF YOUR GRADES ARE IN IMMEDIATE DANGER
 CONTACT YOUR TEACHERS
 This should be the first thing you do when you realise you're in crisis. Email them, and explain your
 situation in short, professional terms. You do not have to include details about your condition. "I have
 a mental health condition" should suffice as to the nature of the issue.
 Tell them that you are going to arrange to see a medical professional as soon as possible, and ask what
 process you should go through to defer/get an extension on assessment, and if they can help you in
 any way.
 Other people you may have to contact or CC in the email (depending on your school):
 University
 High School
 Head of House
 Class Coordinator
 Faculty/School Admin
 Disability Advisor
 Grade Coordinator
 Head of Department
 Academic Admin
 Counsellor
 School Counsellor
 Student Advocate
 BOOK A DOCTOR/THERAPIST APPOINTMENT ASAP
 This will be the person who can vouch for you the most. It's best if you have seen them before and
 they know you. If you can't get an appointment within a few days, call them and email them (if you
 haven't seen them before this will not work). Make sure to check out what counselling your university
 or school offers.
 During this appointment, the priority is to make a plan to get you back on your feet. This effort will
 not be useful if you stay a mess. Once you've figured that out, get two things from this person. One is
 a medical certificate/letter stating that you have, in fact, been going through this crisis. Second is a
 letter that describes the nature of the crisis, what treatment you're going through, and which people
 to contact (psychiatrists, etc.) who can vouch for this.
 Note: The reason I say to get two letters is because there is still a huge stigma around mental illness,
 and you don't want to reveal that you've got a disorder that's highly stigmatised, only to have it come
 back and bite you in the ass later. Don't provide details unless it's necessary or asked for.
 A STUDENT
 KNOW YOUR RIGHTS AS
 Most schools and institutions will have a list of a student's rights and responsibilities online. Look them
 up. Know what your rights are as a student. Also look to see if there are state/national laws protecting
 you, or if your school is a part of a network of schools that has its own code. Some people working in
 schools still think mental health issues are trivial, and you never know when they're going to ignore a
 rule to suit themselves. Make sure you can pick on this if it happens to you.
 Pretty much all schools will have protection in place for students with mental illnesses and disabilities,
 so even if you a miss a deadline for a form or make another mistake, they should take your exceptional
 circumstances into account. This is where a student or disability advisor from school can help you.
 ottom

 IF YOU HAVEN'T REACHED CRISIS YET
 TALK TO A DOCTOR/THERAPIST/COUNSELLOR/TRUSTED ADULT
 If you're going through a hard time, talk to someone who can help you. Any trusted adult or
 professional can help you get back on your feet before it's too late, or refer you to someone who can.
 If it's a new issue, you'll have to see someone like a GP who can refer you to a therapist or mental
 health service.
 Talk to them about what's been happening, and say that you need help. Sometimes, even talking
 about the problem can help you feel better. In these situations, they can also help you figure out what
 you can do at school to catch up/get special help.
 FIGURE OUT HOW TO STUDY WHILE IN A BAD STATE
 Even if you're getting help, it might be some time before you're fully back on track. In these instances,
 try to make the best of a bad situation.
 Can't leave the house? Access lecture recordings and eBooks. Ask your friends to send you their notes,
 or ask the teacher if you can submit your homework via email, or through a friend. Have trouble
 concentrating? Figure out how long you can study without needing a break, and make a schedule
 around that.
 Always make sure to ask your teachers if they can help you with this. Whether it be slightly changing
 the requirements or conditions of a piece of assessment, or simply their understanding that you may
 not be able to attend perfectly, it can make a big difference with your overall marks. If they don't know
 you're struggling, they can't help!
 DON'T PUSH YOURSELF OR OVERTHINK
 When you realise there's an issue, it's easy to fall into panic or try to power through. Don't do this. It'll
 just make you more stressed and aggravate the existing problems, which will make things much worse
 in the long run.
 Though it's hard to believe sometimes, your health and mental health are more important than your
 grades. You can't ignore your mind when it's screaming at you that something is wrong. Listen to it,
 and be easy on yourself.
 The best way to get back to your full potential to ask for help and give yourself what you need. Take a
 break when you need one and practise self-care. It's more important than you might things.

 RECOVERING FROM A BREAKDOWN
 ACCEPT THAT YOU'VE BEEN THROUGH SOMETHING MAJOR
 Once the worst has passed, some people try to brush it off and pretend it never happened. They can
 feel ashamed or embarrassed about what they went through. However, there is absolutely nothing to
 be ashamed or embarrassed about, especially if you had a pre-existing mental health condition. Every
 life has ups and downs and just because yours were a bit more serious than some people's, it doesn't
 mean that you're weak somehow.
 The best thing you can do for yourself is to recognise what happened, and work to prevent it from
 happening again by setting up crisis plans and support networks.
 GET TUTORING TO CATCH UP
 If you've fallen behind, don't worry. There are plenty of ways to catch yourself up and get back on
 track. The best way is to hire a tutor. They can guide you through the work, help you understand
 difficult concepts, and identify the places you need more help.
 Yes, tutors can be expensive, but there's a way to get around this. See if there is anyone who took
 your class the year before who might be willing to tutor you for an hour each week for a discounted
 prince. Similarly, see if there are any students who can help you in exchange for something like
 instrument lessons. And if any of your friends are academically gifted, I'm sure they'd be able to help.
 If all else fails, go to office hours and any free tutoring sessions your school or university offers. Do
 some research, ask around, see what's there.
 PACE YOURSELF AND DON'T RUSH IN
 After a breakdown or crisis, you may be tempted to throw yourself back into your work to catch up.
 Don't! You'll become overwhelmed and end up back at square one. Remember, you've just been
 through a very difficult situation and you're not going to get better overnight.
 Ease yourself in. I definitely recommend starting with a reduced or part-time study load if possible.
 Remember that you may not be back at your full capacity just yet, and difficulties concentrating and
 being motivated could make things hard. By starting off slowly, you're able to get used to studying
 again without too much pressure.
 DEVELOP A ROUTINE
 Yes, this advice is in every piece of study advice ever, but you shouldn't develop just any routine.
 Develop one that allows you plenty of breaks and takes into consider any issues you may have with
 fatigue or focusing. If your breakdown was caused by overwork, make sure this one is easier on you.
 Things to include you could include in a healthy routine (but don't micromanage!):
 "I feel crap" time*
 Breaks and meals
 Plenty of sleep and rest
 "You" time (treat yo self)
 Time to plan for the next week
 Exercise (have you tried yoga? Kidding)
 Meditation/mindfulness
 Friend/family social time
 * Remember that the thoughts and feelings caused by mental illness are not shameful, and ignoring
 and forcing them down will only make them worse. If you need to lie in bed feeling miserable, do it.

 THINGS TO REMEMBER
 DON'T COMPARE YOURSELF TO OTHERS
 It can be easy to look at other people and see your own flaws, but it's important to try not to. Every
 person has different experiences and struggles, so it's not fair to yourself to look at someone without
 yours and think you're behind in some way.
 Taking longer to complete your studies isn't shameful. Making mistakes isn't shameful. Needing
 breaks isn't shameful. You'll get where you need to be in the end. Have patience.
 GRADES DON'T DEFINE YOU
 I spent so much of my life thinking my only worth came from my academic success. And guess what?
 This just led to more anxiety and depression. It's important to realise that things like grades, class
 rankings, GPAS, and "intelligence" aren't that important. Who you are and what you do is far more
 important than these arbitrary labels.
 THERE IS A STIGMA, SO BE PREPARED
 It's an unfortunate reality, but there is still a stigma against mental health issues and there is a chance
 it might affect your experiences while dealing with administrative staff and teachers. There have been
 stories about people telling their people supposed to be guiding them that they have mental health
 issues, and being dismissed because "it's a girl issue" or "it's all in their head".
 Be prepared in case this happens to you. Remind people that it's a medical condition and that you can
 get proof from medical professionals if need be. Plus, there is probably something in your school's
 policies or even the law that protects you when you have a mental illness.
 Remember that just because people are ignorant, that doesn't mean your issue is not 100% real and
 important. Don't let these people make you feel worse.
 YOU CAN DO THIS
 In our darkest moments, it can be hard to believe that we're capable of immense strength, but I
 promise you we are. Whatever obstacle is in your path right now - even if it's your brain chemistry -
 you are going to get through this.
 You've made it through every worst day you've had so far. You've made it through the dark and scary
 moments, and you've come out the other end stronger and wiser.
 Remember that you are strong, and even when you don't feel like it, there is always support available
 to help you realise that strength again.
 tmblimteom
apricot-studies:
smartstudy:

Hey guys. I’m glad to be finally posting my “mental breakdown survival guide”. As you know I struggle a lot with mental health, and so I have been through a lot of breakdowns. So many that I actually dropped out of university after 3 weeks in 2016 and had to take the whole year off. Because of this, I’ve made it my mission to help others with mental health issues as much as I can, so you don’t have to go through what I’ve been through.
Anyway, here is my guide. I tried to keep it general, and actually useful. If you have any questions or additions please feel free to add them. 
And as ever, if you want to talk to me about studying with mental illness or want to see a post on a specific topic, please feel free to message me. 

thank you so much for this

apricot-studies: smartstudy: Hey guys. I’m glad to be finally posting my “mental breakdown survival guide”. As you know I struggle a lot wi...

Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d My children will get "privacy" from me when they can pay their own bills and feed themselves. Until then, you do what I say Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends. t 394 687 1,171 Mermaid Hofessional @StarStuffSister Replying to @TheTrillAC I haven't spoken to my mother in ten years. Welcome to your future. 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android marzipanandminutiae: greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. meanwhile, my parents… password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission regularly checked our internet browsing history shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them. your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights. nothing in this world teaches you to lie and sneak around like a parent who doesn’t believe you should have privacy
Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d
 My children will get "privacy" from me
 when they can pay their own bills and
 feed themselves. Until then, you do what I
 say
 Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends.
 t 394
 687
 1,171
 Mermaid Hofessional
 @StarStuffSister
 Replying to @TheTrillAC
 I haven't spoken to my mother in
 ten years.
 Welcome to your future.
 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android
marzipanandminutiae:

greysonderulo:
dragonsspire:


knight-nick:
If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. 
Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. 
I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. 
As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. 
I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation  we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. 
I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. 


meanwhile, my parents…
password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it
put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission
regularly checked our internet browsing history
shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework
did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities
in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them.
your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights.

nothing in this world teaches you to lie and sneak around like a parent who doesn’t believe you should have privacy

marzipanandminutiae: greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my paren...

Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d My children will get "privacy" from me when they can pay their own bills and feed themselves. Until then, you do what I say Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends. t 394 687 1,171 Mermaid Hofessional @StarStuffSister Replying to @TheTrillAC I haven't spoken to my mother in ten years. Welcome to your future. 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. meanwhile, my parents… password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission regularly checked our internet browsing history shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them. your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights.
Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d
 My children will get "privacy" from me
 when they can pay their own bills and
 feed themselves. Until then, you do what I
 say
 Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends.
 t 394
 687
 1,171
 Mermaid Hofessional
 @StarStuffSister
 Replying to @TheTrillAC
 I haven't spoken to my mother in
 ten years.
 Welcome to your future.
 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android
greysonderulo:
dragonsspire:


knight-nick:
If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. 
Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. 
I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. 
As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. 
I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation  we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. 
I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. 


meanwhile, my parents…
password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it
put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission
regularly checked our internet browsing history
shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework
did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities
in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them.
your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights.

greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my parents installed a lock on...

Books, Children, and Fuck You: The Verge @verge HBO Max locks down exclusive access to new Sesame Street episodes theverge.com/2019/10/3/2089 gSAME STREET 7:20 PM Oct 3, 2019 Vox Media #DearNonnatives @dearnonnatives This show was supposed to be free to help prepare low-income children for school. Fuck you HBO thefloatingstone: scottandhiskind: thefandomdropout: Capitalism done got ahold of  Sesame Street  Okay but this doesn’t tell the full story. The only reason Sesame Street was sold to HBO, was because it was literally on the verge of being cancelled. This was because Sesame Street never received funding from PBS and instead made all of its revenue from things like books, video tapes, and live shows. Unfortunately, with the rise of things like you tube, people no longer paid for these things, so their funding was next to nonexistent and PBS couldn’t help them because most of their funds go to supporting channels/shows that don’t bring in any revenue at all and service mostly rural areas. This is where HBO comes in. They ended up buying Sesame Street to basically save it from the brink of destruction and to let it still be a resource. Also, this is one time where a corporation wasn’t entirely greedy. Yes HBO will still own Sesame Street and new episodes will air on its service, however part of the deal gave Sesame Street a massive flow of cash that will allow them to make twice as many episodes a season. Additionally, new episodes will still air on PBS, it will just be a few months after they air on HBO (which, let’s be real, isn’t gonna matter to little kids). So kids from poorer homes will still have access to the show and will now also have twice as much content to educate them. Sure having it on HBO first isn’t ideal, but they also aren’t playing the role of the evil corporation this time Sometimes, just sometimes, it turns out things will be okOnce again, beware of half truths. You might have gotten the wrong half.
Books, Children, and Fuck You: The Verge
 @verge
 HBO Max locks down exclusive access to new Sesame
 Street episodes theverge.com/2019/10/3/2089
 gSAME STREET
 7:20 PM Oct 3, 2019 Vox Media

 #DearNonnatives
 @dearnonnatives
 This show was supposed to be free to help prepare
 low-income children for school.
 Fuck you HBO
thefloatingstone:

scottandhiskind:

thefandomdropout:

Capitalism done got ahold of  Sesame Street 

Okay but this doesn’t tell the full story.  The only reason Sesame Street was sold to HBO, was because it was literally on the verge of being cancelled.  This was because Sesame Street never received funding from PBS and instead made all of its revenue from things like books, video tapes, and live shows.  Unfortunately, with the rise of things like you tube, people no longer paid for these things, so their funding was next to nonexistent and PBS couldn’t help them because most of their funds go to supporting channels/shows that don’t bring in any revenue at all and service mostly rural areas.  This is where HBO comes in.  They ended up buying Sesame Street to basically save it from the brink of destruction and to let it still be a resource.  
Also, this is one time where a corporation wasn’t entirely greedy.  Yes HBO will still own Sesame Street and new episodes will air on its service, however part of the deal gave Sesame Street a massive flow of cash that will allow them to make twice as many episodes a season.  Additionally, new episodes will still air on PBS, it will just be a few months after they air on HBO (which, let’s be real, isn’t gonna matter to little kids).  
So kids from poorer homes will still have access to the show and will now also have twice as much content to educate them.  Sure having it on HBO first isn’t ideal, but they also aren’t playing the role of the evil corporation this time 

Sometimes, just sometimes, it turns out things will be okOnce again, beware of half truths. You might have gotten the wrong half.

thefloatingstone: scottandhiskind: thefandomdropout: Capitalism done got ahold of  Sesame Street  Okay but this doesn’t tell the full st...

Books, Children, and Fuck You: The Verge @verge HBO Max locks down exclusive access to new Sesame Street episodes theverge.com/2019/10/3/2089 gSAME STREET 7:20 PM Oct 3, 2019 Vox Media #DearNonnatives @dearnonnatives This show was supposed to be free to help prepare low-income children for school. Fuck you HBO scottandhiskind: thefandomdropout: Capitalism done got ahold of  Sesame Street  Okay but this doesn’t tell the full story. The only reason Sesame Street was sold to HBO, was because it was literally on the verge of being cancelled. This was because Sesame Street never received funding from PBS and instead made all of its revenue from things like books, video tapes, and live shows. Unfortunately, with the rise of things like you tube, people no longer paid for these things, so their funding was next to nonexistent and PBS couldn’t help them because most of their funds go to supporting channels/shows that don’t bring in any revenue at all and service mostly rural areas. This is where HBO comes in. They ended up buying Sesame Street to basically save it from the brink of destruction and to let it still be a resource. Also, this is one time where a corporation wasn’t entirely greedy. Yes HBO will still own Sesame Street and new episodes will air on its service, however part of the deal gave Sesame Street a massive flow of cash that will allow them to make twice as many episodes a season. Additionally, new episodes will still air on PBS, it will just be a few months after they air on HBO (which, let’s be real, isn’t gonna matter to little kids). So kids from poorer homes will still have access to the show and will now also have twice as much content to educate them. Sure having it on HBO first isn’t ideal, but they also aren’t playing the role of the evil corporation this time
Books, Children, and Fuck You: The Verge
 @verge
 HBO Max locks down exclusive access to new Sesame
 Street episodes theverge.com/2019/10/3/2089
 gSAME STREET
 7:20 PM Oct 3, 2019 Vox Media

 #DearNonnatives
 @dearnonnatives
 This show was supposed to be free to help prepare
 low-income children for school.
 Fuck you HBO
scottandhiskind:

thefandomdropout:

Capitalism done got ahold of  Sesame Street 

Okay but this doesn’t tell the full story.  The only reason Sesame Street was sold to HBO, was because it was literally on the verge of being cancelled.  This was because Sesame Street never received funding from PBS and instead made all of its revenue from things like books, video tapes, and live shows.  Unfortunately, with the rise of things like you tube, people no longer paid for these things, so their funding was next to nonexistent and PBS couldn’t help them because most of their funds go to supporting channels/shows that don’t bring in any revenue at all and service mostly rural areas.  This is where HBO comes in.  They ended up buying Sesame Street to basically save it from the brink of destruction and to let it still be a resource.  
Also, this is one time where a corporation wasn’t entirely greedy.  Yes HBO will still own Sesame Street and new episodes will air on its service, however part of the deal gave Sesame Street a massive flow of cash that will allow them to make twice as many episodes a season.  Additionally, new episodes will still air on PBS, it will just be a few months after they air on HBO (which, let’s be real, isn’t gonna matter to little kids).  
So kids from poorer homes will still have access to the show and will now also have twice as much content to educate them.  Sure having it on HBO first isn’t ideal, but they also aren’t playing the role of the evil corporation this time

scottandhiskind: thefandomdropout: Capitalism done got ahold of  Sesame Street  Okay but this doesn’t tell the full story. The only reas...

Candy, New York, and Taken: JRehling @JRehling THREAD In 2016, Trump posted a photo of himself that gave away more than he intended. An open desk drawer revealed box after box of Sudafed, piled on top of one another. 11:32 AM Oct 5, 2019 - Twitter Web App 8.1K Retweets 18.9K Likes JRehling @JRehling 23h Replying to @JRehling Even stranger, although the photo was taken in New York, the boxes include a type that is only sold in the United Kingdom, with a different box and distinctive ingredients not found in the U.S. SUDAFED MUCUS RELIEF DAY& NIGHT Capsules Paracetamol, Caffeine & Phenylephrine Reduces mucus Two different capsules-one for day and one for night 16 capsules DAY NIGHT t 486 89 2.4K JRehling @JRehling 23h Sudafed is sometimes used for a high that includes increased alertness, but also has a side effect of pupil dilation t 481 65 2.8K JRehling @JRehling 23h Abuse of this drug was rare, but in order to limits its abuse, regulations were passed limiting the frequency in which an individual could purchase it, and requiring the individual show ID. t270 68 1.9K JRehling @JRehling 23h The desk drawer full of Sudafed, including boxes in New York purchased in the UK indicate that the legal limits of purchase are being circumvented, and that the then-candidate Trump was abusing Sudafed for its high rather than its decongestant effect 27 t490 2.9K JRehling @JRehling 23h From addictionhope.com "A sign of abuse of this drug might be finding a large amount of cold medicine drug packaging among someone's belongings." Addiction Hope: Resources for Those Struggling.. Addiction Hope is an online recovery & support resource site. You'll find education about addicti... addictionhope.com 4 t278 2.1K JRehling @JRehling 23h Beyond pupil dilation, more serious side effects include hallucinations and paranoid psychosis It is very concerning for the entire planet that someone with access to nuclear weapons is showing signs of abusing a drug that leads to paranoid psychosis 16 L 719 4.1K JRehling @JRehling 23h A desk drawer full of a controlled substance, however benign, shows signs that someone is systematically circumventing the law. The side effects of a cold drug are particularly concerning in this case, is a threat to the security of the United States and the world. [END] and this ti394 43 2.7K JRehling @JRehling 23h Note: These observations are not original or complete. @CaslerNoel has posted on this previously, with additional details and deserves all credit for noticing this earlier. NoelCaslerComedy @CaslerNoel Sep 9 Trump snorted Adderall all thru the day on 'Apprentice' he also ate UK. Sudafed like candy. But at night and at parties he switched to cocaine and high-end Methamphetamine that was hand-delivered by Bikers. The point is he was always high. That hasn't changed. @realDonaldTrump 1687 3.2K 45 JRehling @JRehling 16h Replying to @JRehling In response to many who have wondered if the photo is real, it is still up on Trump's Twitter timeline. twitter.com/realdonaldtrum... chaoswolf1982: liberalsarecool: catbirdseat4u: ➣ NBD people…  Just the latest thing trending on Twitter ➣ Oh, and you can access Trump’s original tweet HERE. #SudafedHead Trump is not well. #Sudafed #addict Trump was never well. It’s just that now the proof is coming out.
Candy, New York, and Taken: JRehling
 @JRehling
 THREAD
 In 2016, Trump posted a photo of himself that gave
 away more than he intended. An open desk drawer
 revealed box after box of Sudafed, piled on top of one
 another.
 11:32 AM Oct 5, 2019 - Twitter Web App
 8.1K Retweets
 18.9K Likes

 JRehling @JRehling 23h
 Replying to @JRehling
 Even stranger, although the photo was taken in New York, the boxes
 include a type that is only sold in the United Kingdom, with a different
 box and distinctive ingredients not found in the U.S.
 SUDAFED
 MUCUS RELIEF
 DAY& NIGHT Capsules
 Paracetamol, Caffeine & Phenylephrine
 Reduces mucus
 Two different capsules-one for day
 and one for night
 16 capsules
 DAY
 NIGHT
 t 486
 89
 2.4K
 JRehling @JRehling 23h
 Sudafed is sometimes used for a high that includes increased
 alertness, but also has a side effect of pupil dilation
 t 481
 65
 2.8K

 JRehling @JRehling 23h
 Abuse of this drug was rare, but in order to limits its abuse, regulations
 were passed limiting the frequency in which an individual could
 purchase it, and requiring the individual show ID.
 t270
 68
 1.9K
 JRehling @JRehling 23h
 The desk drawer full of Sudafed, including boxes in New York
 purchased in the UK indicate that the legal limits of purchase are being
 circumvented, and that the then-candidate Trump was abusing
 Sudafed for its high rather than its decongestant effect
 27
 t490
 2.9K
 JRehling @JRehling 23h
 From addictionhope.com
 "A sign of abuse of this drug might be finding a large amount of cold
 medicine drug packaging among someone's belongings."
 Addiction Hope: Resources for Those Struggling..
 Addiction Hope is an online recovery & support
 resource site. You'll find education about addicti...
 addictionhope.com
 4
 t278
 2.1K
 JRehling @JRehling 23h
 Beyond pupil dilation, more serious side effects include hallucinations
 and paranoid psychosis
 It is very concerning for the entire planet that someone with access to
 nuclear weapons is showing signs of abusing a drug that leads to
 paranoid psychosis
 16
 L 719
 4.1K
 JRehling @JRehling 23h
 A desk drawer full of a controlled substance, however benign, shows
 signs that someone is systematically circumventing the law. The side
 effects of a cold drug are particularly concerning in this case,
 is a threat to the security of the United States and the world. [END]
 and this
 ti394
 43
 2.7K

 JRehling @JRehling 23h
 Note: These observations are not original or complete.
 @CaslerNoel has posted on this previously, with additional details and
 deserves all credit for noticing this earlier.
 NoelCaslerComedy @CaslerNoel Sep 9
 Trump snorted Adderall all thru the day on 'Apprentice' he also ate
 UK. Sudafed like candy. But at night and at parties he switched to
 cocaine and high-end Methamphetamine that was hand-delivered
 by Bikers. The point is he was always high. That hasn't changed.
 @realDonaldTrump
 1687
 3.2K
 45
 JRehling @JRehling 16h
 Replying to @JRehling
 In response to many who have wondered if the photo is real, it is still up
 on Trump's Twitter timeline.
 twitter.com/realdonaldtrum...
chaoswolf1982:

liberalsarecool:

catbirdseat4u:


➣ NBD people…  Just the latest thing trending on Twitter
➣ Oh, and you can access Trump’s original tweet HERE.
#SudafedHead


Trump is not well. #Sudafed #addict

Trump was never well. It’s just that now the proof is coming out.

chaoswolf1982: liberalsarecool: catbirdseat4u: ➣ NBD people…  Just the latest thing trending on Twitter ➣ Oh, and you can access Trump’s...