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Being Alone, Apparently, and Bad: Sp3ctre7171 points 3 hours ago You are absolutely correct 1) Miro learned to use the mobility of Winston, as well as his primal, to invent modern dive. He learned all of the tips and tricks and extracted extra value out of the hero that few realized was there. In doing so, he created a role that used main tank as an offensive centerpiece and threat to the backline, and all of a sudden flank heroes weren't alone. A poorly protected ana in the back could be beset by multiple members of the enemy team without much warning. However, this required both new gamesense from miro, and innovations in lucio play from Tobi. Specifically, tobi was able to peel for jehong better than many players thought was possible, compensating for the lack of defensive shields. The compounding innovation led to LH being an offensive threat at every position, and it made it possible for them to do the miraculous turnarounds that defined their APEX championship runs Playing against them was exhausting, as is expected from a team where any one member can wipe you out if left unchecked. 2) Gesture's contribution was twofold. Firstly, he extracted more value out of winston's kit on the defensive side, learning how to use primal both to continue an attack, and to peel for his own back line, which leads into his second main development. That being, under Gesture the final decision was made to transfer shotcalling duties from the main support (lucio and later mercy) and onto the main tank, primarily because engagements were no longer dictated by speed boost, but by the dive from the main tank. Together with the rest of GC Busan, Gesture planned, called, and executed crisp dives that were far better timed and aimed than those of old LH. Whereas Miro's dives were a terror because you would be under attack from multiple divers, the style that Gesture led the way on involved being instantly deleted by a full dive, where a healer pair could be hit with burst from multiple heroes in the same instant. This in turn changed the Winston interplay into a mind game, where there was a choice to be made between deleting the enemy's backline and attempting to save your own. Winston players were forced to learn how to make each leap and pincer engage perfect, or they would simply lose the fight Permalink Embed Save Parent Report Give Gold Reply Sp3ctre7160 points 3 hours ago (Continued) 3) what guxue is introducing is a Winston as the focus of a dive, not just the linchpin. While that sounds like the same thing previously, the Winston would be used to coordinate dives and call the timing, but with Guxue, resources are poured into the Winston to make sure that he can have offensive value. Both because Winston can do damage to the whole team at once (and thus build ult insanely fast against teams pocketing a zen, or against GOATS comps), but also because Winston can simultaneously disrupt the escape methods for healers AND bypass most of the ways in which healers are protected, such as matrix and shields Guxue's innovations are most similar to miro's in that they are mostly focused on a single player's style and that one hero's impact in a game. Changing the offensive presence of a hero is impactful and increases the visible skill gap between good and bad teams, but the effects are mostly limited to that one hero. For that reason, I think that the innovations brought forth by Gesture (and many others) are the most important to the development of modern Winston play, in that they represented a fundamental change in the whole shotcalling and tactical philosophy of dive teams, and opened the gates to the more complex and match specific strategies that we saw in the overwatch league owldesk: some really good tank playstyle analysis on reddit (as a side note, this guy is apparently gonna have analysis articles out soon and you better BELIEVE i’m gonna link them bc if they’re anything like this write up they’ll be great)
Being Alone, Apparently, and Bad: Sp3ctre7171 points 3 hours ago
 You are absolutely correct
 1) Miro learned to use the mobility of Winston, as well as his primal, to invent modern dive. He learned all of the tips and tricks
 and extracted extra value out of the hero that few realized was there. In doing so, he created a role that used main tank as an
 offensive centerpiece and threat to the backline, and all of a sudden flank heroes weren't alone. A poorly protected ana in the
 back could be beset by multiple members of the enemy team without much warning. However, this required both new gamesense
 from miro, and innovations in lucio play from Tobi. Specifically, tobi was able to peel for jehong better than many players thought
 was possible, compensating for the lack of defensive shields. The compounding innovation led to LH being an offensive threat at
 every position, and it made it possible for them to do the miraculous turnarounds that defined their APEX championship runs
 Playing against them was exhausting, as is expected from a team where any one member can wipe you out if left unchecked.
 2) Gesture's contribution was twofold. Firstly, he extracted more value out of winston's kit on the defensive side, learning how to
 use primal both to continue an attack, and to peel for his own back line, which leads into his second main development. That
 being, under Gesture the final decision was made to transfer shotcalling duties from the main support (lucio and later mercy) and
 onto the main tank, primarily because engagements were no longer dictated by speed boost, but by the dive from the main tank.
 Together with the rest of GC Busan, Gesture planned, called, and executed crisp dives that were far better timed and aimed than
 those of old LH. Whereas Miro's dives were a terror because you would be under attack from multiple divers, the style that
 Gesture led the way on involved being instantly deleted by a full dive, where a healer pair could be hit with burst from multiple
 heroes in the same instant. This in turn changed the Winston interplay into a mind game, where there was a choice to be made
 between deleting the enemy's backline and attempting to save your own. Winston players were forced to learn how to make each
 leap and pincer engage perfect, or they would simply lose the fight
 Permalink Embed Save Parent Report Give Gold Reply
 Sp3ctre7160 points 3 hours ago
 (Continued)
 3) what guxue is introducing is a Winston as the focus of a dive, not just the linchpin. While that sounds like the same thing
 previously, the Winston would be used to coordinate dives and call the timing, but with Guxue, resources are poured into the
 Winston to make sure that he can have offensive value. Both because Winston can do damage to the whole team at once (and
 thus build ult insanely fast against teams pocketing a zen, or against GOATS comps), but also because Winston can
 simultaneously disrupt the escape methods for healers AND bypass most of the ways in which healers are protected, such as
 matrix and shields
 Guxue's innovations are most similar to miro's in that they are mostly focused on a single player's style and that one hero's impact
 in a game. Changing the offensive presence of a hero is impactful and increases the visible skill gap between good and bad
 teams, but the effects are mostly limited to that one hero. For that reason, I think that the innovations brought forth by Gesture
 (and many others) are the most important to the development of modern Winston play, in that they represented a fundamental
 change in the whole shotcalling and tactical philosophy of dive teams, and opened the gates to the more complex and match
 specific strategies that we saw in the overwatch league
owldesk:

some really good tank playstyle analysis on reddit (as a side note, this guy is apparently gonna have analysis articles out soon and you better BELIEVE i’m gonna link them bc if they’re anything like this write up they’ll be great)

owldesk: some really good tank playstyle analysis on reddit (as a side note, this guy is apparently gonna have analysis articles out soon a...

80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m
 We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo
 Expand
 4, Reply
 Retweet ★ Favorite More

 Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m
 Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24
 ATARI
 75
 Expand
 Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe
lightspeedsound:
videogamesarepurehappiness:

maqdaddio:

ask-gallows-callibrator:

vergess:

coelasquid:

derples:

raisehelia:

cavebae:

estpolis:

mrdappersden:

They did it, they fucking did it.

holyfducjk

HISTORY

holy shit!

can someone explain this to me

Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true.

I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player.
It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology.

how can a video game possibly be that bad

People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today.
The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype.
However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million.
While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly.
But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price?
Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few.
So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert.


This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later. 
 It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales.

Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives.

Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link:
https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC

this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times

lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: ...

80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m
 We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo
 Expand
 4, Reply
 Retweet ★ Favorite More

 Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m
 Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24
 ATARI
 75
 Expand
 Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe
lightspeedsound:

videogamesarepurehappiness:

maqdaddio:

ask-gallows-callibrator:

vergess:

coelasquid:

derples:

raisehelia:

cavebae:

estpolis:

mrdappersden:

They did it, they fucking did it.

holyfducjk

HISTORY

holy shit!

can someone explain this to me

Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true.

I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player.
It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology.

how can a video game possibly be that bad

People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today.
The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype.
However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million.
While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly.
But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price?
Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few.
So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert.


This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later. 
 It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales.

Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives.

Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link:
https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC

this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times

lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: ...

Andrew Bogut, Chicago, and Finals: Sports Illustrated @Sinow & Follow An 8-year-old girl and her entire team were banned from a Nebraska soccer tournament because she 'looks like a boy' ONLY ON 6 GIRL CAN'T PLAY; "LOOKS LIKE A BOY Girl, 8, banned from tournament because she looks like a boy Tournament organizers banned Mili Hernandez's team despite her family's repeated pleas. si.com RETWEETS LIKES ,177 1,307 3:15 PM- 5 Jun 2017 WOWT News oWT6News Follow v รู้เ Mili led her team to the finals of a girls soccer tourney in Springfield before officials insisted she's a boy. 8 year-old girl disqualified from soccer game because she Mili Hernandez loves soccer - and her short haircut. She helped lead her girls soccer team to the finals of a girls tournament this weekend. They were suddenly wowt.com RETWEETS LIKES 223 456 8:12 AM -5 Jun 2017 Abby Wambach @AbbyWambach Follovw Mili, don't EVER let anyone tell you that you aren't perfect just as you are.i won championships with short hair 8 year-old girl disqualified from soccer game because she Mili Hernandez loves soccer and her short haircut. She helped lead her girls soccer team to the finals of a girls tournament this weekend. They were suddenly wowt.com RETWEETS LIKES 3,049 10,032 3:36 PM -5 Jun 2017 Michael McCann @McCannSportsLaw Follow Despite seeing Mili Hernandez's health insurance card that proved her gender, tournament officials disagreed. Good luck with that in court. Sports Illustrated @Slnow An 8-year-old girl and her entire team were banned from a Nebraska soccer tournament because she 'looks like a boy' on.si.com/2saLBqP RETWEETS LIKES 1,110 2,087 3:45 PM-5 Jun 2017 Chicago Red Stars @chicagoredstars Follow Hey Mili You've inspired all of us! Come join us here in Chicago for a game. Your jersey is waiting for you See you soon! TOYOTA PARK RETWEETS LIKES 636 4,349 5:52 AM - 6 Jun 2017 lagonegirl: Super fucked up! wtf is wrong with these people?  #IamWithMili! What is every little girl supposed to have long hair in a ponytail? So happy to see all of the support going her way.
Andrew Bogut, Chicago, and Finals: Sports Illustrated
 @Sinow
 & Follow
 An 8-year-old girl and her entire team were
 banned from a Nebraska soccer tournament
 because she 'looks like a boy'
 ONLY ON 6
 GIRL CAN'T PLAY; "LOOKS LIKE A BOY
 Girl, 8, banned from tournament because she looks like a boy
 Tournament organizers banned Mili Hernandez's team despite her family's
 repeated pleas.
 si.com
 RETWEETS LIKES
 ,177 1,307
 3:15 PM- 5 Jun 2017

 WOWT News
 oWT6News
 Follow v
 รู้เ
 Mili led her team to the finals of a girls soccer
 tourney in Springfield before officials insisted
 she's a boy.
 8 year-old girl disqualified from soccer game because she
 Mili Hernandez loves soccer - and her short haircut. She helped lead her girls
 soccer team to the finals of a girls tournament this weekend. They were suddenly
 wowt.com
 RETWEETS LIKES
 223 456
 8:12 AM -5 Jun 2017

 Abby Wambach
 @AbbyWambach
 Follovw
 Mili, don't EVER let anyone tell you that you
 aren't perfect just as you are.i won
 championships with short hair
 8 year-old girl disqualified from soccer game because she
 Mili Hernandez loves soccer and her short haircut. She helped lead her girls
 soccer team to the finals of a girls tournament this weekend. They were suddenly
 wowt.com
 RETWEETS LIKES
 3,049 10,032
 3:36 PM -5 Jun 2017

 Michael McCann
 @McCannSportsLaw
 Follow
 Despite seeing Mili Hernandez's health
 insurance card that proved her gender,
 tournament officials disagreed. Good luck
 with that in court.
 Sports Illustrated @Slnow
 An 8-year-old girl and her entire team were banned from a Nebraska soccer
 tournament because she 'looks like a boy' on.si.com/2saLBqP
 RETWEETS LIKES
 1,110 2,087
 3:45 PM-5 Jun 2017

 Chicago Red Stars
 @chicagoredstars
 Follow
 Hey Mili
 You've inspired all of us! Come join us here in
 Chicago for a game. Your jersey is waiting for
 you
 See you soon!
 TOYOTA PARK
 RETWEETS LIKES
 636
 4,349
 5:52 AM - 6 Jun 2017
lagonegirl:





Super fucked up! wtf is wrong with these people?  #IamWithMili!




What is every little girl supposed to have long hair in a ponytail? So happy to see all of the support going her way.

lagonegirl: Super fucked up! wtf is wrong with these people?  #IamWithMili! What is every little girl supposed to have long hair in...

80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo Expand 4, Reply Retweet ★ Favorite More Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24 ATARI 75 Expand Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe lightspeedsound: videogamesarepurehappiness: maqdaddio: ask-gallows-callibrator: vergess: coelasquid: derples: raisehelia: cavebae: estpolis: mrdappersden: They did it, they fucking did it. holyfducjk HISTORY holy shit! can someone explain this to me Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true. I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player. It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology. how can a video game possibly be that bad People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today. The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype. However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million. While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly. But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price? Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few. So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert. This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later.   It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales. Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives. Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link: https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times
80s, Bad, and Christmas: Chris Kohler @kobunheat 18m
 We have ET. WE HAVE ET pic.twitter.com/fIPTXgsyoo
 Expand
 4, Reply
 Retweet ★ Favorite More

 Chris Kohler @kobunheat-4m
 Close up. pic.twitter.com/inSKukib24
 ATARI
 75
 Expand
 Reply Retweet FavoriteMoe
lightspeedsound:

videogamesarepurehappiness:

maqdaddio:

ask-gallows-callibrator:

vergess:

coelasquid:

derples:

raisehelia:

cavebae:

estpolis:

mrdappersden:

They did it, they fucking did it.

holyfducjk

HISTORY

holy shit!

can someone explain this to me

Thirty years ago a legendary ET game came to fruition, so awful that as the tale told, all unsold copies of it were buried in a pit in New Mexico. A documentary film crew has just unearthed the stash, proving the legend true.

I don’t think people fully grasp just how awful it was. This one game, by the sheer merit of its unmatched shittiness, destroyed the video game and console market so thoroughly that the at home video game nearly went the way of the 8-track player.
It was literally so awful that it nearly changed the entire course of technology.

how can a video game possibly be that bad

People don’t really understand why it was terrible though, and the reasons why are extremely important and relevant especially today.
The game itself is bad, yes. It was built up to be an exciting hit for kids to play at Christmas in 1982. So much in fact, that retailers bought WAY more stock then could every be sold based on the hype.
However, people at the time liked the game. It looks bad now, but the game itself was pretty on par with the times. It wound up selling 1.5 million copies. Which would be great, except Atari was expecting to sell 4-5 million.
While initial reception was positive, critics started panning the game as critics do. While it was no worse than most other games at the time, it was stil frustrating and hard to play. It could not live up to the hype that had been built and negative press built up quickly.
But what was ALSO happening was a flood of cheap imitations on the market. ET is a licensed game, and like all licenses comes at a higher markup. So if you wanted to buy a game for yourself or your kid, would you buy 1 game, or 2 for the same price?
Atari was also screwing around with how they handled their distributors. Just before the game went to public, but AFTER the game had been bought and shipped, Atari announced that they were cancelling every existing contract with distributors and signing with only a select few.
So distributors, now pissed off and with an abundance of games that were NOT selling and with prices slashed horribly to sell games that people were quickly losing interest in, retailers put their claims to return a collective 2.5-3.5 million copies back to Atari. Atari, unable to recycle the cartridges or resell them in any way, wound up burying them in the Nevada desert.


This caused the Video Game Crash of the early 80s that put a dark mark on video games until Nintendo (and in some small part other game companies) to revive later. 
 It was the perfect storm. An over-hyped overpriced game sold to an increasingly frustrated and over-saturated market with retailers scrambling to make a dime while Game Devs blame the market for poor sales.

Some say the proverbial planets are aligning again, with way too many consoles putting way too samey games on the market at way too high a cost with a strong dependence on Pre-orders and pre-order exclusives.

Wanna give the game a shot?  Internet Archives actually has a copy of it at this link:
https://archive.org/details/E.T._The_Extra-Terrestrial_1982_Atari_NTSC

this is like the dutch tulip bubble of our times

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