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Apparently, Family, and Head: wwwoslightlywarped.com sixpenceee: The Witch of Joshua Ward House This Georgian and Federal style building was constructed by Joshua Ward, a wealthy merchant sea captain, in the late 1780s on the remaining foundations of former sheriff George Corwin’s house on Washington Street in Salem, Massachusetts. Corwin was a bloody figure whose zeal added to the unfortunate events surrounding Salem in the late 1600s. Nicknamed ‘The Strangler’ after his preferred torture (which included tying his prone victims’ necks to their ankles until the blood ran from their noses), he is said to have been responsible for many of the ‘witches’’ deaths, including that of Giles Corey who was crushed to death by placing heavy stones on his chest in order to extract a confession. Legend states that just before he died, Corey cursed the sheriff and all sheriffs that follow in his wake, for Corwin’s despicable acts. It should be noted here that every sheriff since Corey uttered his curse died while in office or had been “forced out of his post as the result of a heart or blood ailment.” Corwin himself died of a heart attack in 1696, only about four years after the end of the trials.  By the time of his death, Corwin was so despised that his family had to bury him in the cellar of their house to avoid desecration of the corpse by the public. In the early 1980s Carlson Realty bought the House with the intention of turning it into their headquarters. After moving in, a realtor by the name of Dale Lewinski began the task of taking photographs of the staff members to add to a welcome display.  Lewinski used a Polaroid camera to snap the head-and-shoulders, passport-style pictures. It was the photograph of a colleague by the name of Lorraine St. Peter that caused a stir. The Polaroid was developed and, instead of showing St. Peter, it appeared to depict a frightening image: a strange, black-haired, feminine figure. St. Peter was nowhere to be seen on the snap. The photograph has, apparently, not been cropped at all. St. Peter has been entirely replaced by the apparition. 
Apparently, Family, and Head: wwwoslightlywarped.com
sixpenceee:

The Witch of Joshua Ward House
This Georgian and Federal style building was constructed by Joshua Ward, a wealthy merchant sea captain, in the late 1780s on the remaining foundations of former sheriff George Corwin’s house on Washington Street in Salem, Massachusetts.
Corwin was a bloody figure whose zeal added to the unfortunate events surrounding Salem in the late 1600s. Nicknamed ‘The Strangler’ after his preferred torture (which included tying his prone victims’ necks to their ankles until the blood ran from their noses), he is said to have been responsible for many of the ‘witches’’ deaths, including that of Giles Corey who was crushed to death by placing heavy stones on his chest in order to extract a confession.
Legend states that just before he died, Corey cursed the sheriff and all sheriffs that follow in his wake, for Corwin’s despicable acts. It should be noted here that every sheriff since Corey uttered his curse died while in office or had been “forced out of his post as the result of a heart or blood ailment.” Corwin himself died of a heart attack in 1696, only about four years after the end of the trials.
 By the time of his death, Corwin was so despised that his family had to bury him in the cellar of their house to avoid desecration of the corpse by the public. In the early 1980s Carlson Realty bought the House with the intention of turning it into their headquarters. After moving in, a realtor by the name of Dale Lewinski began the task of taking photographs of the staff members to add to a welcome display.
 Lewinski used a Polaroid camera to snap the head-and-shoulders, passport-style pictures. It was the photograph of a colleague by the name of Lorraine St. Peter that caused a stir. The Polaroid was developed and, instead of showing St. Peter, it appeared to depict a frightening image: a strange, black-haired, feminine figure. St. Peter was nowhere to be seen on the snap. The photograph has, apparently, not been cropped at all. St. Peter has been entirely replaced by the apparition. 

sixpenceee: The Witch of Joshua Ward House This Georgian and Federal style building was constructed by Joshua Ward, a wealthy merchant sea ...

Birthday, Community, and Lesbians: maireddog: Mark Ashton died on this day, the 11th of February, in 1987. Mark was born on the 19th of May, 1960 in Oldham, but grew up in Portrush, Northern Ireland. He moved to London in 1978, where he worked in a bar in King’s Cross, in drag as a barmaid with a blonde beehive. In the 1980s, he volunteered for London Lesbian and Gay Switchboard, campaigned for CND and joined the Communist Party, becoming the first gay secretary of the Young Communist League. Though Mark transformed the Party’s approach to LGBT rights, he and Mike Jackson, who he’d met through Switchboard, wanted to be active as openly gay people. They formed Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners (LGSM) when they collected donations for miners on strike at 1984 Gay Pride. In the evening of 1984 Pride, a miner spoke at a rally, and they were struck by the similarities between the two struggle, of LGBT rights and the Miners’ Strike. Having collected about £150, they advertised a meeting in Capital Gay. 11 people turned up and from the meeting they made a leaflet to launch LGSM - the leaflet was accepted except with an amendment to ‘one in ten miners is gay.’ As LGSM, they supported the miners as lesbian and gay people. At the second meeting, they decided to focus on one community, of the Dulais Valley, as one of the members, Hugh Williams, was from there. They then met David (Dai) Donovan, who also had thought through the similarities of their struggles and how LGSM could help. A month later, 27 lesbians and gay men, arrived at Onllwyn village in Dulais Valley. Other than some hostility (and confusion towards vegetarianism), they experienced warmth, friendship and solidarity. LGSM raised £20,000 for families of miners on strike, and based on The Sun writing that “a group of perverts” were “supporting the pits,” they organised the Pits and Perverts concert in December, 1984, headlined by Bronski Beat. The miners marched with LGSM at Gay Pride in 1985. Mark was admitted to hospital on 30th January, 1987, and died 12 days later from pneumonia, aged 26. At his memorial, there were banners from the Communist Party, Anti-Apartheid, anti-nuclear, Caribbean and community groups, as well as from LGSM. The Mark Ashton Trust was created to support individuals diagnosed with Aids; Mark is also remembered on the UK Aids Memorial Quilt and by Terrence Higgins Trust, with the Mark Ashton Red Ribbon Fund and a plaque at their London headquarters. In 2017, on what would have been his 57th birthday, he was honoured with a blue plaque above Gay’s The Word bookshop. [Images: 1. Mark Ashton at Gay Pride 1981. 2. Mark Ashton at Gay Pride 1985, wearing a LGSM t-shirt and holding a pink “Communist Party” banner with the words “pinko commie queers.” 3. Blue plaque reading: “Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners. Mark Ashton 1960-1987. Political and Community Activist. LGSM met at Gay’s the Word bookship on this site 1984/5.”]
Birthday, Community, and Lesbians: maireddog:
Mark Ashton died on this day, the 11th of February, in 1987. 
Mark 
was born on the 19th of May, 1960 in Oldham, but grew up in Portrush, Northern Ireland. He moved to London in 1978, where he worked in
 a bar in King’s Cross, in drag as a barmaid with a blonde beehive.
In
 the 1980s, he volunteered for London Lesbian and Gay Switchboard, 
campaigned for CND and joined the Communist Party, becoming the first gay secretary of the Young Communist League. Though Mark transformed the Party’s approach to LGBT rights, he and Mike Jackson, who he’d met through Switchboard, wanted to be active as openly gay people. They formed 
Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners (LGSM) when they collected donations for miners on strike at 1984 Gay Pride.
In the evening of 1984 Pride, a miner spoke at a rally, and they were struck by the similarities between the two struggle, of LGBT rights and the Miners’ Strike. Having collected about £150, they advertised a meeting in Capital Gay. 11 people turned up and from the meeting they made a leaflet to launch LGSM - the leaflet was accepted except with an amendment to ‘one in ten miners is gay.’ 
As LGSM, they supported the miners as lesbian and gay people. At the second meeting, they decided to focus on one community, of the Dulais Valley, as one of the members, Hugh Williams, was from there. They then met David (Dai) Donovan, who also had thought through the similarities of their struggles and how LGSM could help. A month later, 27 lesbians and gay men, arrived at Onllwyn village in Dulais Valley. 
Other than some hostility (and confusion towards vegetarianism), they experienced warmth, friendship and solidarity. LGSM raised £20,000 for families of miners on strike, and based on The Sun writing that “a group of perverts” were “supporting the pits,” they organised the Pits and Perverts concert in December, 1984, headlined by Bronski Beat. The miners marched with LGSM at Gay Pride in 1985. 
Mark was admitted to hospital on 30th January, 1987, and died 12 days later from pneumonia, aged 26. At his memorial, there were banners from the Communist Party, Anti-Apartheid, anti-nuclear, Caribbean and community groups, as well as from LGSM. The Mark Ashton Trust was created to support individuals 
diagnosed with Aids; Mark is also remembered on the UK Aids Memorial 
Quilt and by Terrence Higgins Trust, with the Mark Ashton Red Ribbon 
Fund and a plaque at their London headquarters. In 2017, on what would have been his 57th birthday, he was honoured with a blue 
plaque above Gay’s The Word bookshop. 

[Images: 1. Mark Ashton at Gay Pride 1981. 2. Mark Ashton at Gay 
Pride 
1985, wearing a LGSM t-shirt and holding a pink “Communist Party” banner
 with the words “pinko commie queers.” 3. Blue plaque reading: “Lesbians
 and Gays Support the Miners. Mark Ashton 1960-1987. Political and 
Community Activist. LGSM met at Gay’s the Word bookship on this site 
1984/5.”]

maireddog: Mark Ashton died on this day, the 11th of February, in 1987. Mark was born on the 19th of May, 1960 in Oldham, but grew up in P...

Books, Fucking, and Google: saurons-optometrist Follow siniristiriita Having a phone with an internet is such a fucking luxury, though? Like, in the 1980's, if l on a saturday night suddenly needed to find out whether birch trees and the Wendingo myth were native to the same areas, Iwould have to wait until the library opens on monday, go in hoping they have books on trees that happen to mention where birches have spread globally, and then ask if they have any books on the myths and folklore of native americans, receive a weird look from the librarian, find our that there's one book in another library next town over, but it's being borrowed by someone else, wait two weeks to get it, and then read the entire damn thing only to discover that this one doesnt mention wendingos at all And I just got my answer with two google searches, in less than two minutes The answer is yes vegansamstudies kcough coughk where did this question come from??? siniristiriita Well, I'm from Finland, and as a first thing, if there's one thing to know about Finland, it's full of birch trees. Also, at this time of the year, the sun sets early so it's completely black out there at 4 pm. These things do happen in the northern hemisphere. I couldn't get a proper picture, but this is roughly what a birchwood looks at night It's actually way, way creepier when the sky is black and everything is dark, and it's freezing cold because Mother Nature does not love us. Also, humans are good at pattern recognition and creeping the shit out of themselves. Now consider Source: siniristiriita 38 notes The Birchwood
Books, Fucking, and Google: saurons-optometrist Follow
 siniristiriita
 Having a phone with an internet is such a fucking luxury, though? Like, in the
 1980's, if l on a saturday night suddenly needed to find out whether birch trees
 and the Wendingo myth were native to the same areas, Iwould have to wait
 until the library opens on monday, go in hoping they have books on trees that
 happen to mention where birches have spread globally, and then ask if they
 have any books on the myths and folklore of native americans, receive a weird
 look from the librarian, find our that there's one book in another library next
 town over, but it's being borrowed by someone else, wait two weeks to get it,
 and then read the entire damn thing only to discover that this one doesnt
 mention wendingos at all
 And I just got my answer with two google searches, in less than two minutes
 The answer is yes
 vegansamstudies
 kcough coughk where did this question come from???
 siniristiriita
 Well, I'm from Finland, and as a first thing, if there's one thing to know about
 Finland, it's full of birch trees. Also, at this time of the year, the sun sets early
 so it's completely black out there at 4 pm. These things do happen in the
 northern hemisphere. I couldn't get a proper picture, but this is roughly what a
 birchwood looks at night
 It's actually way, way creepier when the sky is black and everything is dark, and
 it's freezing cold because Mother Nature does not love us. Also, humans are
 good at pattern recognition and creeping the shit out of themselves. Now
 consider
 Source: siniristiriita
 38 notes
The Birchwood

The Birchwood

Beautiful, Christmas, and Crying: "Freddie didn't announce publicly that he had AIDS until the day before he died in 1991. Although he was flamboyant onstage-an electric front man on par with Bowie and Jagger-he was an intensely private man offstage. But Freddie told me he had AIDS soon after he was diagnosed in 1987.I was devastated. I'd seen what the disease had done to so many of my other friends. I knew exactly what it was going to do to Freddie. As did he. He knew death, agonizing death, was coming. But Freddie was incredibly courageous. He kept up appearances, he kept performing with Queen, and he kept being the funny, outrageous, and profoundly generous person he had always been. As Freddie deteriorated in the late 1980s and early '90s, it was almost too much to bear. It broke my heart to see this absolute light unto the world ravaged by AIDS. By the end, his body was covered with Kaposi's sarcoma lesions. He was almost blind. He was too wealk to even stand. By all rights, Freddie should have spent those final days concerned only with his own comfort. But that wasn't who he was. He truly lived for others. Freddie had passed on November 24, 1991, and weelks after the funeral, I was still grieving. On Christmas Day, I learned that Freddie had left me one final testament to his selflessness. I was moping about when a friend showed up at my door and handed me something wrapped in a pillowcase. I opened it up, and inside was a painting by one of my favorite artists, the British painter Henry Scott Tuke. And there was a note from Freddie. Years before Freddie and I had developed pet names for each other, our drag-queen alter egos. I was Sharon, and he was Melina. Freddie's note read, "Dear Sharon, thought you'd like this. Love, Melina. Happy Christmas." I was overcome, forty-four years old at the time, crying like a child. Here was this beautiful man, dying from AIDS, and in his final days, he had somehow managed to find me a lovely Christmas present. As sad as that moment was, it's often the one I think about when I remember Freddie, because it captures the character of the man. In death, he reminded me of what made him so special in life." -Sir Elton John Love is the Cure: On Life, Loss, and the End ofAIDS soundsof71: Elton John on Freddie Mercury.  (I’m not posting this less to correct the timeline portrayed in Bohemian Rhapsody, which I mostly really enjoyed, than simply to share a beautiful story that shines light on who Freddie actually was, up to the very end.)
Beautiful, Christmas, and Crying: "Freddie didn't announce publicly that he had AIDS
 until the day before he died in 1991. Although he was
 flamboyant onstage-an electric front man on par with
 Bowie and Jagger-he was an intensely private man
 offstage. But Freddie told me he had AIDS soon after he
 was diagnosed in 1987.I was devastated. I'd seen what
 the disease had done to so many of my other friends. I
 knew exactly what it was going to do to Freddie. As did
 he. He knew death, agonizing death, was coming. But
 Freddie was incredibly courageous. He kept up
 appearances, he kept performing with Queen, and he
 kept being the funny, outrageous, and profoundly
 generous person he had always been.
 As Freddie deteriorated in the late 1980s and early
 '90s, it was almost too much to bear. It broke my heart to
 see this absolute light unto the world ravaged by AIDS.
 By the end, his body was covered with Kaposi's sarcoma
 lesions. He was almost blind. He was too wealk to even
 stand.

 By all rights, Freddie should have spent those final
 days concerned only with his own comfort. But that
 wasn't who he was. He truly lived for others. Freddie had
 passed on November 24, 1991, and weelks after the
 funeral, I was still grieving. On Christmas Day, I learned
 that Freddie had left me one final testament to his
 selflessness. I was moping about when a friend showed
 up at my door and handed me something wrapped in a
 pillowcase. I opened it up, and inside was a painting by
 one of my favorite artists, the British painter Henry Scott
 Tuke. And there was a note from Freddie. Years before
 Freddie and I had developed pet names for each other,
 our drag-queen alter egos. I was Sharon, and he was
 Melina. Freddie's note read, "Dear Sharon, thought
 you'd like this. Love, Melina. Happy Christmas."
 I was overcome, forty-four years old at the time,
 crying like a child. Here was this beautiful man, dying
 from AIDS, and in his final days, he had somehow
 managed to find me a lovely Christmas present. As sad as
 that moment was, it's often the one I think about when I
 remember Freddie, because it captures the character of
 the man. In death, he reminded me of what made him so
 special in life."
 -Sir Elton John
 Love is the Cure:
 On Life, Loss, and the End ofAIDS
soundsof71:

Elton John on Freddie Mercury. 
(I’m not posting this less to correct the timeline portrayed in Bohemian Rhapsody, which I mostly really enjoyed, than simply to share a beautiful story that shines light on who Freddie actually was, up to the very end.)

soundsof71: Elton John on Freddie Mercury.  (I’m not posting this less to correct the timeline portrayed in Bohemian Rhapsody, which I most...

Beautiful, Christmas, and Crying: "Freddie didn't announce publicly that he had AIDS until the day before he died in 1991. Although he was flamboyant onstage-an electric front man on par with Bowie and Jagger-he was an intensely private man offstage. But Freddie told me he had AIDS soon after he was diagnosed in 1987.I was devastated. I'd seen what the disease had done to so many of my other friends. I knew exactly what it was going to do to Freddie. As did he. He knew death, agonizing death, was coming. But Freddie was incredibly courageous. He kept up appearances, he kept performing with Queen, and he kept being the funny, outrageous, and profoundly generous person he had always been. As Freddie deteriorated in the late 1980s and early '90s, it was almost too much to bear. It broke my heart to see this absolute light unto the world ravaged by AIDS. By the end, his body was covered with Kaposi's sarcoma lesions. He was almost blind. He was too wealk to even stand. By all rights, Freddie should have spent those final days concerned only with his own comfort. But that wasn't who he was. He truly lived for others. Freddie had passed on November 24, 1991, and weelks after the funeral, I was still grieving. On Christmas Day, I learned that Freddie had left me one final testament to his selflessness. I was moping about when a friend showed up at my door and handed me something wrapped in a pillowcase. I opened it up, and inside was a painting by one of my favorite artists, the British painter Henry Scott Tuke. And there was a note from Freddie. Years before Freddie and I had developed pet names for each other, our drag-queen alter egos. I was Sharon, and he was Melina. Freddie's note read, "Dear Sharon, thought you'd like this. Love, Melina. Happy Christmas." I was overcome, forty-four years old at the time, crying like a child. Here was this beautiful man, dying from AIDS, and in his final days, he had somehow managed to find me a lovely Christmas present. As sad as that moment was, it's often the one I think about when I remember Freddie, because it captures the character of the man. In death, he reminded me of what made him so special in life." -Sir Elton John Love is the Cure: On Life, Loss, and the End ofAIDS soundsof71: Elton John on Freddie Mercury.  (I’m not posting this less to correct the timeline portrayed in Bohemian Rhapsody, which I mostly really enjoyed, than simply to share a beautiful story that shines light on who Freddie actually was, up to the very end.)
Beautiful, Christmas, and Crying: "Freddie didn't announce publicly that he had AIDS
 until the day before he died in 1991. Although he was
 flamboyant onstage-an electric front man on par with
 Bowie and Jagger-he was an intensely private man
 offstage. But Freddie told me he had AIDS soon after he
 was diagnosed in 1987.I was devastated. I'd seen what
 the disease had done to so many of my other friends. I
 knew exactly what it was going to do to Freddie. As did
 he. He knew death, agonizing death, was coming. But
 Freddie was incredibly courageous. He kept up
 appearances, he kept performing with Queen, and he
 kept being the funny, outrageous, and profoundly
 generous person he had always been.
 As Freddie deteriorated in the late 1980s and early
 '90s, it was almost too much to bear. It broke my heart to
 see this absolute light unto the world ravaged by AIDS.
 By the end, his body was covered with Kaposi's sarcoma
 lesions. He was almost blind. He was too wealk to even
 stand.

 By all rights, Freddie should have spent those final
 days concerned only with his own comfort. But that
 wasn't who he was. He truly lived for others. Freddie had
 passed on November 24, 1991, and weelks after the
 funeral, I was still grieving. On Christmas Day, I learned
 that Freddie had left me one final testament to his
 selflessness. I was moping about when a friend showed
 up at my door and handed me something wrapped in a
 pillowcase. I opened it up, and inside was a painting by
 one of my favorite artists, the British painter Henry Scott
 Tuke. And there was a note from Freddie. Years before
 Freddie and I had developed pet names for each other,
 our drag-queen alter egos. I was Sharon, and he was
 Melina. Freddie's note read, "Dear Sharon, thought
 you'd like this. Love, Melina. Happy Christmas."
 I was overcome, forty-four years old at the time,
 crying like a child. Here was this beautiful man, dying
 from AIDS, and in his final days, he had somehow
 managed to find me a lovely Christmas present. As sad as
 that moment was, it's often the one I think about when I
 remember Freddie, because it captures the character of
 the man. In death, he reminded me of what made him so
 special in life."
 -Sir Elton John
 Love is the Cure:
 On Life, Loss, and the End ofAIDS
soundsof71:

Elton John on Freddie Mercury. 
(I’m not posting this less to correct the timeline portrayed in Bohemian Rhapsody, which I mostly really enjoyed, than simply to share a beautiful story that shines light on who Freddie actually was, up to the very end.)

soundsof71: Elton John on Freddie Mercury.  (I’m not posting this less to correct the timeline portrayed in Bohemian Rhapsody, which I most...

80s, Fashion, and Saw: tnkisu:saw this outfit today and my mind went keith
80s, Fashion, and Saw: tnkisu:saw this outfit today and my mind went keith

tnkisu:saw this outfit today and my mind went keith